... it is amusing to see them coming round, cup in hand, begging ...

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SWMODave

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The average soldier can smell pot-liquor a mile off, and he will go for it every time, unless he is tied. And "greens!" Did you ever see the negroes eat greens, at an old-time corn-shucking? It was nothing to the way the soldiers devour them. To the hungry soldier—and all of them are hungry now—to the half-famished soldier it is equal to a wedding feast. There is not a man of the S. L. A. who cannot tell, by a sort of prescience or instinct, when a pot-boiling is going on in camp. And as soon as they can locate "the game," it is amusing to see them coming round, cup in hand, begging for "just a little bit of that liquor!"

A cup of hot pot-liquor is a boon to the soldier. It has a wonderfully invigorating and reviving effect. It warms, exhilarates, cheers. It thaws the frozen heart, moves the silent tongue, sends a prayer to the lip of the recipient, and starts a tear of happiness in the eye of the giver. I will never cease to sing the praises of pot-liquor as long as I live.

Under the Stars and Bars: A History of the Surry Light Artillery
 

captaindrew

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It the juice of the soup from cooked vegetables usually greens. I like best the pot liquer from turmip roots and their greens cooked to together.
Thanks for that, I thought they were masking brewing up some O Be Joyful, wasn't familiar with that term. Learnt something new.
 

Ole Miss

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Sue fixed fried pork chops, field peas and turnip greens with corn bread. Had some Hot Chow-Chow I got from the Amish Ladies outside the Shiloh Park with my own habanero pepper sauce to go with the meal and it was very fine! I am blessed to have such a great wife who is an excellent cook and to live in the South with all of our food selections! Truly am blessed.
Regards
David
 

JPK Huson 1863

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Sue fixed fried pork chops, field peas and turnip greens with corn bread. Had some Hot Chow-Chow I got from the Amish Ladies outside the Shiloh Park with my own habanero pepper sauce to go with the meal and it was very fine! I am blessed to have such a great wife who is an excellent cook and to live in the South with all of our food selections! Truly am blessed.
Regards
David

What are field peas please? Husband and I got on to the topic of ' greens ' just yesterday so it's odd coming across this thread. There's just no equivalent up here- our Yankee taste buds can't make sense of them. Yes, I know there's a secret conviction it makes Philistines of all of us :angel:, which may be true given how healthy they are. Had a married couple from NC as minsters for 10 years before they fled back home who spoke of ' greens ' as if this was a sacred dish.

Now chow chow we have although may be regional. Great aunts canned it along with Picallili and any other vegetable you can pack in a Mason jar. Had no idea it was Southern.

Ok so there's a thread unless @donna has already done it. Traditional recipes North and South and which ones never got far from home.
 

Shannon Wolf

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What are field peas please? Husband and I got on to the topic of ' greens ' just yesterday so it's odd coming across this thread. There's just no equivalent up here- our Yankee taste buds can't make sense of them. Yes, I know there's a secret conviction it makes Philistines of all of us :angel:, which may be true given how healthy they are. Had a married couple from NC as minsters for 10 years before they fled back home who spoke of ' greens ' as if this was a sacred dish.

Now chow chow we have although may be regional. Great aunts canned it along with Picallili and any other vegetable you can pack in a Mason jar. Had no idea it was Southern.

Ok so there's a thread unless @donna has already done it. Traditional recipes North and South and which ones never got far from home.
Field peas are china red crowder peas.

https://www.camelliabrand.com/products/field-peas/

Me being the lonely bachelorette I buy mine in the can

This brand being my favorite:
https://margaretholmes.com/products/seasoned-field-peas-snaps/

FYI From the first bite you will be hooked, even on the canned ones.

Side note on greens : This G.R.I.T.S likes hers with Gulden's Mustard not hot peppers. Try eating them like you would cabbage.
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

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Shannon Wolf

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Thanks for sharing this @Shannon Wolf. The recipes on that web page sound delicious. Now, to see if we can get field peas here in Southcentral PA!
You can find them both on Amazon :wink: They are best cooked with a ham hock or fatback. Cast iron helps too. Took me a long time to figure out why everyone who tried my recipes said they never tasted the same when they made them. Turns out it's because I use the same cast iron skillet for everything. Once I got one a skillet I salvaged from the flea market, and she tried my cornbread recipe, she was like oh now I get it. LOL
 

Cavalry Charger

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Cast iron helps too. Took me a long time to figure out why everyone who tried my recipes said they never tasted the same when they made them. Turns out it's because I use the same cast iron skillet for everything.
I heard mention of a cast iron skillet only recently ... I wonder what it is about them that makes the difference?
 

Shannon Wolf

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I heard mention of a cast iron skillet only recently ... I wonder what it is about them that makes the difference?
I think it's the seasoning. There is no chemicals, the nonstick is from repeated use. The older the pan, the better the seasoning generally. My skillet is roughly 4 generations old to the best of my knowledge. My understanding is that my paternal Great Grandmother gave it to my Grandmother as a wedding gift, She gave it to my Father and bio mom on their marriage, and my father gave it to me a few years ago. If I have to scrub it, I do it with salt. Like my father taught me I never use shortening to season it. I use lard or reserved bacon fat. I use the same methods to resurrect the rusted relics I find at the flea market. I have a chainmail scrubber and wire brush I use to remove most of the rust, wash it thoroughly , then grease it, and toss it in a 500 degree oven for as long as you can stand it. I normally open up the house wide cause it smokes and smells. An hour normally does it well.
 

Lampasas Bill

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I imagine black-eyed peas would also be considered "field peas." They're a big favorite here in Texas, and, I presume, throughout the South. It wouldn't be a proper new year's day without a pot of black-eyed peas for luck in the coming year. Probably a custom spread by the slaves.
 
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