Is the Centennial of World War I Getting More U.S. Attention than the Sesqui of the Civil War Did?

Pat Young

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#1
A coupe of years ago there were several threads asking if the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War had gotten the attention that it deserved.

Many compared the lower public interest in the CW150 compared to the 1976 Bicentennial and (arguably) to the 1961-65 CW100. My opinion was that comparing the CW150 to those two anniversaries ignored the many other important anniversaries over the last 50 years that have received less attention.

This week we begin the the Centennial of the U.S. entry into World War I. In parts of Europe this has been a major commemorative opportunity, although the NY Times noted that Russia has noticibly ignored the 1917 Russian Revolution.

I wanted to start a discussion about whether the WWI 100th is getting more attention in your part of the woods than the CW150 did. How do they compare?
 

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Pat Young

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#3
I don't see the WWI centennial getting much attention. What articles I have seen are mainly remarking on how little awareness the public has of it.
I have seen a number of public programs on it here in New York. The NY Public Library had an excellent display of propaganda posters in its collection, several of which were artisitcally innovative. I have seen lectures as well at our historical societies as well.

My grandfather (a German-American) served in the US army during the war as did his brother, but neither saw combat.
 

Jamieva

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#4
I had not seen anything until this week which marks the 100th anniversary of the US entry into the war. So I would say the CW 150th got more, but it's all relative. Both got very little notice.

And it could be very localized. Of course living in the Richmond area, teh 150th gets more attention than it would in ....Colorado or Montana or somewhere the war didn't happen.
 
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#6
I'm guessing it will not get the attention it deserves. May will be the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea, June will be the 75 anniversary of the Battle of Midway, and August will be the 75th anniversary of the invasion of Guadalcanal and I'm guessing they will get more attention than the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I.
 

kevikens

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#8
Considering that we just went through the bicentennial of the War of 1812 with about as much hoopla and fanfare as go with a dental appointment I don't think there will be much of a commemoration. The Argonne, Belleau Wood, Chateau Thierry are a lot harder to spell than Bull Run, Gettysburg and the Wilderness and with due respect to Pershing he's neither a Lee or a Grant. And, good heavens, Hiddenburg, Ludendorf, Foch and Attaturk just do not roll of one's lips as Jackson, and Hancock, Pickett and Sheridan. And what sounds as natural as the Monitor and the Merrimac? The Blucher and the Insufferable? And as inspiring as "Mademoiselle from Armatiers" once was, does it rival Dixie or Battle Cry of Freedom? No, I do not see a mini series coming out on the Great War. Now, had it actually been the war that ended all wars it might be a different matter, but as it stands, while it's a big event Over There, it's small potatoes over here.
 
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#10
For what it's worth, today's local above-the-fold article was about the local response to the outbreak of WWI and mentioned some ties to local residents. I don't remember ever seeing anything about the Civil War. That might be because Oregon just didn't really have much connection (other than Joe Lane running for VP against Lincoln before the war). We've got the obligatory WWI artillery piece downtown outside the old library though.
 
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WJC

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#11
A coupe of years ago there were several threads asking if the Sesquicentennial of the Civil War had gotten the attention that it deserved.

Many compared the lower public interest in the CW150 compared to the 1976 Bicentennial and (arguably) to the 1961-65 CW100. My opinion was that comparing the CW150 to those two anniversaries ignored the many other important anniversaries over the last 50 years that have received less attention.

This week we begin the the Centennial of the U.S. entry into World War I. In parts of Europe this has been a major commemorative opportunity, although the NY Times noted that Russia has noticibly ignored the 1917 Russian Revolution.

I wanted to start a discussion about whether the WWI 100th is getting more attention in your part of the woods than the CW150 did. How do they compare?
I have seen nothing marking the centennial of WWI other than a few postings on British news internet sites.
It appears to be- at least for those living today in America- a forgotten war.
Some of you may recall that there was a great deal attention to the Civil War Centennial throughout American media. I saw next to nothing about the Civil War Sesquicentennial.
Of course, it was a different time....
 
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kevikens

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#12
I have seen nothing marking the centennial of WWI other than a few postings on British news internet sites.
It appears to be- at least for those living today in America- a forgotten war.
Some of you may recall that there was a great deal attention to the Civil War Centennial throughout American media. I saw next to nothing about the Civil War Sesquicentennial.
Of course, it was a different time....
As for the Brits, any walk through any village in Britain will have its ubiquitous war memorial with a distressingly lengthy list of the best and brightest of a lost generation now existing solely and sadly as a inscriptions on stone. If there are commemorations of that war going on in Britain they must be most somber and reflective as they say good by to all that.
 

Yankeedave

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#13
almost half the casualties of all of america's wars are from the civil war. That and all it's casualties were home grown. The familia connections were tangible for generations.
 

16thVA

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#15
My alma mater is ending a show of WW1 art this weekend, but I'm heading over there tomorrow to see it. They brought the enormous John Singer Sargent over from the Imperial War Museum. I wish they had included some of the Canadian artists like FH Varley who worked as a war artist.

https://www.pafa.org/exhibitions/world-war-i-and-american-art

FH Varley

This is a google search of Varley images, the first dozen or so are mostly his.

https://www.google.com/search?q=FH+...4GMKHXC7B2cQ_AUIBigB&biw=1147&bih=549&dpr=1.4
 

donna

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#16
I don't think anniversary of US going into World War I will get hardly any attention. Most people I know don't know anything about it. It is sad. My great uncle was in the Air Services. He serviced those planes they flew. He was in both France and Italy. I have all his papers. I am investigating other relatives who served. They served with honor and distinction and deserve to be remembered.
 

Bruce Vail

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#17
In Britain, a new book called The Fall of the Ottomans: The Great War in the Middle East was recently published to commemorate the U.K.'s entry into the war in 1915. The author is Eugene Rogan, a history professor at Oxford.

My knowledge of the subject was largely to confined to several viewings of the movie Lawrence of Arabia. So I learned a lot. The section on the genocide of the Armenians was bone chilling.

There is virtually nothing about the US in the book. It's a good read anyway.
 
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#18
Out here in the far west, I've seen nothing at all on either World War I or the recent 200th anniversary of the War of 1812. Yes, today is the 100th anniversary of the US' getting into WWI, and it's a little more than two years since the 200th of the Battle of New Orleans, but as far as people out here are concerned, nobody ever heard of either. The Civil War, or at least local history connected with it, is a little more visible, and of course on December 7 a lot of people remind/are reminded about World War II. I did see today in what used to be the local (Portland, OR) newspaper and is now just a web site, that PBS will be showing "The Great War" starting tonight. I'm wondering if this is the same special shown about 15 years ago which ended with the haunting Siegfried Sassoon poem,"Have You Forgotten Yet?" ("Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you'll never forget.")
 

Yankeedave

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#19
WW1 is bigger over seas i suspect. Rememberence of the civil war in my erea has been centered on moving monuments.
Since this is Virginia (civil war central) there has been a change in the add campaigns in the cw was being more emphasized.
 

Bee

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#20



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