Is the 14th Amendment central to understanding the legacy of the Civil War and Reconstruction?

Texoma Kidd

Cadet
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
The Naturalization Act of 1802 did not require an oath to a state, but rather to the Federal government through a pledge to uphold the United States Constitution. Naturalization was a Federal power, not a state one. Only white people could be Naturalized prior to Reconstruction. Here is the 1802 Naturalization Act in re the oath requirement. View attachment 344541
Thank you. It’s difficult to find any discussions on this issue, other than modern day court issues concerning the 14th. I do believe we’ve entered into a new classification, though. I found various discussions about our all caps name. And several articles on adhesion contracts. While I was researching the topic. But to be honest I was sidetracked and I spent more time reading then researching. Seems like I do that a lot. I’ll keep trying. the
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Location
Long Island, NY
Thank you. It’s difficult to find any discussions on this issue, other than modern day court issues concerning the 14th. I do believe we’ve entered into a new classification, though. I found various discussions about our all caps name. And several articles on adhesion contracts. While I was researching the topic. But to be honest I was sidetracked and I spent more time reading then researching. Seems like I do that a lot. I’ll keep trying. the
There is a recent book on pre-war citizenship that I purchased but have not yet read. When I get a chance, I will post a little on it.
 

wbull1

First Sergeant
Official Vendor
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
The 14th amendment's legacy continues today, I would argue. In 1868 the government decided that native Americans were not covered by the 14th amendment. All women got the right to vote in 1920; all native Americans were granted citizenship in 1924. In 1962 the state of Utah gave Native Americans the right to vote. In 2013 the state of Mississippi approved the 14th amendment. Today, February 13, 2020, the House of Representatives approved extending the deadline to ratify the ERA for women. (I hope this qualifies as modern politics since it refers to the 14th amendment.)
 

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Is Section 1 of the 14th Amendment central to understanding the legacy of the Civil War and Reconstruction? Historian David Blight writes that:

Among all the enactments of Reconstruction, none embody the lasting significance, or the heart of the conflict in this revolution and counter-revolution better than section one of the Fourteenth Amendment. It ought to be embraced as a holy writ that binds our national community, that fortifies even the very idea of America born of this second founding. Based, in part, on language proposed by John Bingham of Ohio, an evangelical Christian and former abolitionist, it reads:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the states wherein they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
What do you think?
Concerning when this amendment was written deals with the interpretation of it .The only protection for the backs was still the Proclamation and that could have been removed or void by the next President.It also covered a small region of the nation.Even with the defeat of the Confederate military there was still fear that eventually the South would return to the old system.To void this ,a amendment to the Constitution was necessary.This amendment gives to the former slaves or blacks in general the protection and rights of a citizen of this country and removes the dread of forceful return to slavery,This not only protected the present black but all those ''born " in this nation.As to naturalized that would cover those who followed the procedure to becoming citizens,This removed the authority from the states to the federal government. BOOK to read "The Second Founding,how the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution " by Eric Foner.This covers the Thirteen,Fourteenth,and Fifteenth Amendments along with the Civil Rights bill.After about eighty years the Constitution gave a answer to the question to who governed the nation.The book does deal with the women's suffrage movement in regards to these amendments and their impart on other Constitutional issues.
 

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