Is Colonel Garrott's Body Still Under A Vicksburg Street?

ucvrelics

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June 17, 1863, Confederate Colonel Isham W Garrott while using a borrowed musket was trying to takeout a yankee sharpshooter when he was killed instantly by the sharpshooter.
Isham_Warren_Garrott.jpg


Col Garrott was the commander of the 20th Alabama and took over the brigade after Gen Tracy was killed at Port Gibson. Fort Garrott is named after him. Col. Garrott was promoted to brigadier general, but he died on the firing line before he received word of his promotion, and the promotion was not awarded posthumously.
Fort-Garrott.jpeg


He was buried on the Finney plantation, called Lonewood, which was located on the southwest corner of Speed and Drummond Streets. His grave was located under what is now Finney Street, between Drummond and Cherry Streets. The grave was under a window at Lonewood, and his remains were never moved, according to a letter from Garrott’s wife. Many believe that his body was eventually moved to Soldiers Rest where his memorial marker stands. I can't find and info on his body being remove to the Soldiers Rest so are his remains still under a street in Vicksburg?
Finney-Plantation-Lonewood garrott buried.jpg
 

Tompre

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Vicksburg Miss.
Seems pretty unusual an well like Confederate officer killed and honored with a fort name would remain buried under a street to me. Especially in Vicksburg.

Seems someone would've dug him up at some point. Any pictures of the probable spot? Before @Tom Hughes ran off with the bones of course.
There are quite a few soldiers buried around Vicksburg. One officer is in the yard of an antebellum home, and a couple are buried in a church cemetery close to their camp. They were killed when a tornado hit the camp. The Finney garden would have been an ideal and safe location for a grave, that is till a road was built over it many years later.
 

ucvrelics

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This is the undertakers record of Garrott’s burial. There is no record of his body being exhumed.

View attachment 392715
Thanks for the info, so he is still under the street and not where the marker is in the cemetery. According to Warner's book Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders, Garrott was buried under the window of a friend's {Finney} house in Vicksburg and remains never moved {letter from Garrott's wife}. What happened to Garrott was the following: A Confederate undertaker's list/map of CS burials in Vicksburg was lost-although partially found years later. This list reported a "Colonel Garnet" of the 20th Alabama-although gravesite plot unknown. Apparently, Garrott was reburied in Vicksburg's Cedar Hill/Confederate Cemetery; however due to the misspelling of his surname and incorrect rank-his Generals commission was received after his death-apparently lead to reporting that his remains were not moved from his first burial place. Thus the NPS listing for Garrott now has his correct rank/surname but no grave number.[3] A stone marker for him stands in Soldiers Rest Confederate Cemetery, ironically located in the Cedar Hill (Old Vicksburg City) Cemetery.
 

Rusk County Avengers

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It has occurred to me a ground penetrating radar would be a good way to find him, and or confirm this.

Heck some enterprising folks could see about exhuming him and giving the grave he deserves by his wife or by his troops. Who wouldn't want to be a part of getting a Confederate officer out from under a street and into a proper grave where he ain't runover all the time?
 

Tompre

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Vicksburg Miss.
It has occurred to me a ground penetrating radar would be a good way to find him, and or confirm this.

Heck some enterprising folks could see about exhuming him and giving the grave he deserves by his wife or by his troops. Who wouldn't want to be a part of getting a Confederate officer out from under a street and into a proper grave where he ain't runover all the time?
I wouldn’t be surprised if some relic hunter hadn’t already dug him up. One of the more successful hunters lived next to the old Finney plantation. He had a beautiful tongue to a Leech and Rigdon officers sword belt plate that he supposedly found in his yard.
 

Rusk County Avengers

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Coffeeville, TX
I wouldn’t be surprised if some relic hunter hadn’t already dug him up. One of the more successful hunters lived next to the old Finney plantation. He had a beautiful tongue to a Leech and Rigdon officers sword belt plate that he supposedly found in his yard.

I'd imagine his bones would've turned to a black spot by now, but I honestly don't know if that loess soli in Vicksburg has the same effect, (eating away bones) as most other areas.

It'd be good to lay him to rest proper, which I don't think anyone would call under street proper, and on the plus side Confederate funerals if done proper are always good for getting people interested in history.

His spirit flew long ago, which is why I'm not personally as scrupulous of graves as others, or would I'd ever dream of suggesting gravedigging, but under a street kind of warrants a proper move.
 
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Tompre

Corporal
Joined
Dec 16, 2014
Location
Vicksburg Miss.
It has occurred to me a ground penetrating radar would be a good way to find him, and or confirm this.

Heck some enterprising folks could see about exhuming him and giving the grave he deserves by his wife or by his troops. Who wouldn't want to be a part of getting a Confederate officer out from under a street and into a proper grave where he ain't runover all the time?
I'd imagine his bones would've turned to a black spot by now, but I honestly don't know if that loess soli in Vicksburg has the same effect, (eating away bones) as most other areas.

I'd be good to lay him to rest proper, which I don't think anyone would call under street proper, and on the plus side Confederate funerals if done proper are always good for getting people interested in history.

His spirit flew long ago, which is why I'm not personally as scrupulous of graves as others, or would I'd ever dream of suggesting gravedigging, but under a street kind of warrants a proper move.
I had a fellow relic hunter tell me about an officers grave close behind the CS lines. The grave had been plundered, but a friend and I found a couple pieces of skull, and had him reinterred. There was very little left, bone-wise.
 
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