Restricted "In their own words", contemporary documents on the creation and dedication of Confederate Memorials

Andersonh1

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Address and Poem
DELIVERED AT THE UNVEILING OF THE MONUMENT ERECTED
TO THE MEMORY OF THE CONFEDERATE DEAD OF
WARREN COUNTY, N. C.,
AUGUST 27, 1903

Raleigh, NC
Edwards and Broughton Printing Co. 1906

Address of Hon. Walter A. Montgomery, in which he remembers the fallen as family to those still living, whose final resting places are largely unknown. The monument is their tombstone.

If in our power, we would gather the sacred ashes of each of these cherished ones from his shallow grave, and deposit them with loving hands around this stone. The native visitor would then, at this spot, as he looked upon this marble, typical of the form and characteristics of the dead whose virtues it is erected to commemorate, experience an increased sensation of reverence, for he would be standing among the sepulchres of soldiers who were patriots, and who gave their lives for their country, for their love of the same, and who were “ bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh.”​
The Association, whose spokesman I am, was organized to build, on some suitable ground, an appropriate monument in memory of the Confederate dead of Warren. This spot already the last resting place of departed friends, and overlooking the historic old town, was most aptly selected for its site. The foundation was laid two years ago.​
It has been completed, and this day is unveiled amidst a cloud of witnesses. Behold it in its symmetry and beauty, emblematic both of the virtues and the deeds it is intended to commemorate, and of the gratitude of those who have erected it.​
Let us hope that it will for ages withstand the ravages of time, a reminder to coming generations of honored worth and noble ancestry.​

The monument is not meant to stir up sectional animosity, he tells the listener, but to evoke the love and admiration the living have for the fallen soldiers, and to inspire like devotion to home and duty from those who see the memorial. He praises the women who raised the memorial, and speaks of the military history of the county and state, and some history of the war itself. Though he defended secession, he refers to it here as a dead issue.
 

Andersonh1

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An Address Delivered at the Unveiling of the
Henry County Confederate Monument

Paris, Tennessee
Saturday, October 13, 1900
by Ex-Governor James D. Porter

Paris, Tenn
Post-Intelligencer Job Print

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=loc.ark:/13960/t4jm2k83w&view=1up&seq=11
And I thank you, ladies, in the name of my comrades, living and dead, for providing this memorial. Without your aid and earnestness, without your patriotism and loving devotion this work, so long projected, would have remained undone. Your love and devotion to the cause and to the men who fought the battles of the South has found expression in the erection of this monument. You have followed the example of all civilized people — Assyrian, Indian, Greek or Roman — in this expression of gratitude and admiration. You speak to posterity through this marble in a language commemorative of the heroism of the soldiers of Henry County at the same time you illustrate your own admiration for devotion to duty under circumstances of the greatest trial.​

-----------------​
Ladies of the Monumental Association, I have recited to you the names of some of my comrades whose actions you perpetuate by the erection of this monument No knightlier soldiers ever went out to battle for their country, no soldier ever had a cause worthier of the supreme effort they made, no cause ever promoted greater enthusiasm, no cause ever demanded greater sacrifices, no cause was ever so loyally sustained. We cannot forget them, we cannot forget the sacrifices or the devotion of the women of the South, they accepted poverty that they might promote the cause for which their fathers, husbands and sons fought and died.​
 

Viper21

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I can't stress enough, how much I love this thread Anderson. There is just no substitution for period info, & documents, stating the motivations behind the erection of these monuments. I've heard many times over the years, "Why don't we just take their word for it", or something to that effect. I couldn't agree more ...
 

Andersonh1

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Address at the unveiling of the Confederate monument, at Raleigh,
N.C., May 20th, 1895 / by Alfred Moore Waddell.
Wilmington, N.C. : LeGwin Bros., 1895.

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nc01.ark:/13960/t1pg2g53b
Alfred Moore Waddell was a North Carolina lawyer and politician before and after the Civil War. During the war Waddell was in the Confederate cavalry until his health forced him to resign. See the link below for more information about his life. It's typical to find a former Confederate officer from the area asked to speak at the dedication of a monument.

https://northcarolinahistory.org/encyclopedia/alfred-moore-waddell-1834-1912/
Waddell praises the women who had worked so long and hard to make the monument a reality. Earlier the cornerstone had been laid, also with great ceremony, and in May of 1895 the memorial was finished and unveiled. Waddell praises the beauty of the monument, which he says will be for their children "a perpetual appeal to their pride and patriotism." His job at the dedication is to trace the history. And then he quotes "a distinguished scholar and statesman of the South" who he does not name.

The establishment of truth is never wrong. History, as written, if accepted in future years will consign the South to infamy. If she were guilty of rebellion or treason, if she adopted and clung to barbarisms, essential sins and immoralities, then her people will be clothed, as it were, with the fabled shirt of Nessus, fatal to honor, to noble development, to true life.​

Waddell says the "accepted" history has been written by Northern men, and has essentially been created out of "cherry picked" facts:

Now the accepted history of the late war, like the previous history of the United States, has been written by Northern men, and a Southerner, reading it, cannot help recalling what Froude said about history generally: namely, that it seemed to him "like a child's box of letters with which we can spell any word we please. We have only to select such letters as we want, arrange them as we like, and say nothing about those which do not suit our purpose."​
Waddell intends to set the record straight and speak of history "with candor and fearlessness - the plain unvarnished truth". He is not interested in reviving sectionalism, but he feels he and his fellow Southerners have been wrongly accused , and he wants to push back against the accusations. He goes through some of the history of North Carolina from the Revolutionary War forward to his day and gives some of the political and constitutional views that established state sovereignty that we've seen from other Southern spokesmen of the era. I won't go into all of that in detail since this thread is mainly concerned with the reasons these men and women gave for the existence of Confederate monuments, but Waddell's choice to go over the history indicates that the monument is, to him, meant to be a reminder of that history. I will say that there is some good information here for those looking for the Southern view of the war and the reasons for it, and Waddell plainly had a good working knowledge of United States history.

He goes on after reciting some of the history to sing the praises of the Confederate soldier, and then narrows his focus to the men from North Carolina. And he again praises the women who raised the monument, which he turns his attention back towards:

You have not erected this monument exclusively to the Confederate Dead of our own State, nor do we confine our loving tributes to them alone.​
We embrace in the wide sweep of our affectionate remembrance all who laid down their lives in defence of the rights and liberties of the Southern States and people.​
From the cold blue lakes upon the Canadian border to where the warm waves lap softly upon the yellow sands of the Gulf, on a thousand hill-sides and in a thousand valleys they sleep - some beneath monuments like this, some in private cemeteries, thousands, alas! in unknown graves. We love and honor the memory of all alike. They deserve such tribute if mortal men ever did, and never was it paid more sincerely than now and here.​
Stand then, bronze image of him who wore the gray! Thou canst not meet with calmer mien than did he the sunshine and the storm. Not more enduring is thy granite base than the love on which he rests. Thou art a triumph of Art; he was God's gift to his country. Thou shalt perish, but he shall live forever in the hearts of his people.​
 
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Andersonh1

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Address of Hon. T.W. Mason before the Ladies' Memorial Association
at the laying of the corner-stone of the Confederate monument
,
Raleigh, N.C., May 20, 1895.
Mason, Thomas Williams, 1839-1921.
Raleigh, N.C. : E.M. Uzzell, Printer, 1898.

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nc01.ark:/13960/t4xh0dz99
The opening of this speech shows the value of having a former Confederate speak at one of these ceremonies as he praises his fallen comrades in very moving terms. Thomas Williams Mason served with a North Carolina Confederate unit during the war, rising to the rank of Captain by the time the war ended. NCPedia describes him as "planter, judge, railroad commissioner, and orator" and his skill with words can be seen in this address.

https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/mason-thomas-williams
The day invites us. It is our Independence Day. It is our day of glorious memories. Now, and through all the years to come, it is our Confederate Monument Day. For this day our mountains have given their fairest treasure into the hands of woman, and she has brought this treasure reverently into our midst. Our brothers have taken it gratefully from her hands and laid the stone in its place. We watch and wait with swelling hearts. Voices fall upon the ear again that have been still since our camp-fires went out. We feel the touch of elbows again ; our lines are forming; our ensigns stream above us; our bugles are calling. The stone which you have laid in its place to-day, my brothers, shall be lifted up ; and, by its side and from its summit, he shall look into our faces again, our comrade, our brother; "bone of our bones and flesh of our flesh " ; brave as he who followed the Eagles of Rome, or the Lilies of France, our Confederate brother: he who was first at Bethel; he who was nearest the foe at Gettysburg; he whose rifle gave the last salute to the flag which was folded with immortal honor.​
We have waited long enough to consecrate this stone. History approves and demands it. They who were our foes, but who are now our friends, ask that it be done. The passing years have laid their hands, in blessing, upon the head of our comrade, and deepened the halo about his name.​

Mason goes on to extol the virtues of the Confederate soldier at length. He talked about the history of North Carolina and the Union, and how the men of NC understood both. He praised the women and their conduct during the war. He went over the history of many North Carolina units during the war. In the end, he returns to the cornerstone and future monument, and given that all he's talked about during this address is the Confederate soldier from North Carolina, it's clear that he believes the future monument will represent their memory.

My brothers, the memory of your comrade will not fade. In the twilight of the years to come it will be as the luminous star which led the Eastern worshippers, where a new Life had come to abide among men long enough to teach them how to live like heroes and die like martyrs. The daughters of North Carolina will point our children and our children's children to that star. They will never turn their faces from the Confederate soldier. They gave you your battle flags wet with the dew of their tears, and in that sign and with their prayers yon made the name of North Carolina noble. With each returning spring-time the grave of your comrade blooms out afresh as they lay their hands upon it- To-day they have embalmed his memory in stone. They have given you this token of their love, that shall not fail. Let us lift up this token of their love, my brothers! The light of the morning will bless it, the glory of the evening will hallow it, the patient stars will watch over it, and the calm face of our comrade will teach us courage for to-day and hope for the morrow.​
 

Andersonh1

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Address Delivered at the Opening of the Building of the
Confederate Memorial Institute

at Richmond, Virginia on May 3, 1921
by H. Snowden Marshall

Published by the Board of Managers of the Institute
Richmond, VA
Whittet & Shepperson, Printers, 1921

Hudson Snowden Marshall was the son of Charles Marshall, an aide to Robert E. Lee, which Hudson Marshall notes is the reason he was asked to speak at the opening of the Memorial Institute. Marshall briefly discusses what the country had lived through in regard to the war and Reconstruction, and states that an outsider would never believe just how much the country had healed since that time.

The Confederate Memorial Institute: https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:9k41zh174

What did Mr. Marshall have to say about this building, which was essentially a museum of Confederate history?

We are consecrating this building today as a memorial to the generation which bore these trials, and as a lesson to the descendants of the men and women of our Southern country who lived in those dark and terrible times. We are asking, all of their posterity to understand and believe the same thing that we know about them.​

-------------------​
We still are derelict in this respect, and the repetition of falsehood, unchallenged by Weary listeners, sometimes produces an accepted fact.​
It is said that We learn from history that no one ever learns anything from history.​
We surely can learn nothing from false history.​
If our people fought for the preservation of slavery, we ought to tear down this building and wreck the statues that beautify this historic city.​
If they were rebels, or traitors to any government that was entitled to their allegiance, we ought to teach the next generation to despise their memory.​

It was about preserving the history and countering what Marshall saw as false history, which characterized the South in ways that Marshall felt were wrong. The Memorial Institute was not like the typical monument to the dead that we've seen so far in this thread, it had a much more expansive purpose: to tell the Southern side of the story.
 

Andersonh1

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Oration pronounced by Col. Charles C. Jones, Jr. : on the 31st October
1878, upon the occasion of the unveiling and dedication of the Confederate
monument, erected by the Ladies Memorial Association of Augusta, Georgia.

Jones, Charles Colcock, 1831-1893.
Augusta, Ga. : [s.n., 1878?]

"A forted residence 'gainst the tooth of time And rasure of oblivion."

A re-print from the Augusta "Evening Sentinel" of October 31, 1878

https://hdl.handle.net/2027/loc.ark:/13960/t89g5xp8h
The reverberations of the thunders of contending armies had scarcely been hushed within our borders, and the blood of our precious dead ceased to incarnadine the land for whose retention they had wrestled so bravely but in vain, when it entered into the hearts of noble women in our city to erect a monument in honor of the Lost Cause, in memory of the gallant soldiers from this county who had perished during the Confederate struggle for independence.​
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With rapturous joy do we hail the dedication of this goodly monument. With kindling hearts do we respond to the inspirations and the memories which its presence bespeaks. We glory in the rectitude of the cause, and exult in the valor of the men symbolized by its towering form and martial outlines.​
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This occasion recalls the virtues, and consecrates in enduring marble the images of our slain warriors. It crystalizes in towering and symmetrical form the memories of the Confederate struggle for independence. Meet it is that such characters and recollections should be perpetuated by the costliest and the most durable expressions of art. Most seemly is it that this gift should be bestowed by the hand of pure woman....​
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Monuments are connecting links between the present and the past. They symbolize the noblenesses which have gone before, and betoken a happy recognition of them by those who come after. They denote a "just and grateful appreciation of the virtues and services they are designed to commemmorate, and stand as silent yet impressive teachers of the noblest lessons." About them gather the recollections of former achievements and brave endeavors, and in them dwells a consciousness of the dignity and manhood of the race whose history has been enriched by such exhibitions of worth and excellence. They stimulate children to a generous emulation of the meritorious deeds of their ancestors, and incite to action. They foster martial spirit and engender courageous aspirations. By portraying the images of the great, they keep ever before our eyes deathless examples. The looks and thoughts of sympathy begotten by their heroic presence give birth to heroism. Within the charmed sphere of their influence the living learn to value and to imitate the true, the beautiful and the sublime, and insensibly acquire the virtues they symbolize.​
 

Andersonh1

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Official Proceedings of Fifth Annual Reunion of Missouri Division United Confederate Veterans
and Dedication of Monument

Springfield, Mo., August 8, 9 and 10, 1901

Among the minutes, election results and attendees of this UCV reunion as a section dedicated to the unveiling of a Confederate monument at Moberly, Missouri. The dedication speech by Mayor Chilton Atkinson of Springfield can be found beginning on page 47, where he contrasts the sentimental memorial ceremony with the "vast storm of commercialism and materialism that has descended upon this country."

When the last sad strains of taps sound over the grave of some departed Confederate hero, it is the signal for the reveille which calls us to the field of labor. Masons we must be, and over the ashes of the Confederacy we must complete her temple of fame. A temple, yes, and her cornerstone is the statesmanship of the Old South, and her mighty spire shall typify the loftiness of Southern soldiery and devoted womanhood.​

It is the current generation's duty to pass along the history, once the veterans of the war have passed on.

We are the sentinels around the graves of her mighty soldiery. We are those entrusted to dispense to future civilization what she would teach of valor, culture and statesmanship. We are to fight for her until all of the thorns of Reconstruction are taken from her side. And we shall let the whole world know that we stand guard over the histories of our people, and bid defiance to the robbers who would strip us of that noble heritage.​

I love this quote:
“A land without ruins is a land without memories— A land without memories is a land without liberty."​
The mayor's speech was followed by a speech by Colonel H. N. Phillips.
In North and South America mounds and monuments are found that were built by races of which otherwise we would have scarcely a tradition. Among our own people it has long been the custom to erect monuments to perpetuate the names of our great men and women and to direct attention to the Observance of a proper respect for the memory of such persons and for great and everlasting principles.​

Like the mayor, we see Phillips emphasize the fact that the old soldiers are passing away.
So, we have come to give our meed of praise and thanks to the kind hearts and generous hands who have erected this monument to emphasize and perpetuate the memory of a Confederate soldier. We, the followers of the Southern cross, acknowledge the compliment and extend our thanks and praise to every noble soul that has cast in, even his mite, to this great and deserving enterprise that shall commemorate the acts and principles held dear by a Confederate soldier, and which is certainly acceptable to you, Old comrades. And now, a word with you. We know that many are gone to attend the great review and that but few remain of all the grand and gallant men, who with stalwart stride and clanging spur, fought for Dixie Land.​

----------------​
We are getting older now, and soon in all the ways of man, on land or sea, not one Confederate soldier may be seen. Those who follow after us cannot wear our swords, or unfurl for us our banners. With us the Confederacy must pass; they may come to see the monuments.....​

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This monument to be unveiled is to perpetuate the name, achievements and memories of a Confederate soldier. Who were the Confederate soldiers? Impartial history will answer, The men who fought with Lee, with Johnson, Taylor and Kirby Smith ; the men who marched with Hood and rode with Wheeler, Price, Marmaduke, Cockrell , Parsons and Jo. Shelby’s men. The men who had the courage of their convictions. The men who stood in the front line at Richmond and Manassas and stormed the heights Of Gettysburg, who died on Shiloh’s dark and bloody ground; the heroes of a thousand well-fought fields, and the men who followed the flag to the end.​

------------------​
We are soon to dedicate this marble shaft in memory of the heroic deeds of the chivalrous sons of Missouri and of other States of the South who fell at Oak Hills. It is a loving tribute erected in large part by the efforts of Southern women. May it stand forever to tell coming generations the story Of the knightly courage of the sons of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas, who carried the starry banner Of the young Confederacy to triumph on this historic field.​

He was followed by Captain George Jones, treasurer of the monument committee, who also had a few things to say while giving his report.
- planning and fundraising for the monument had been ongoing for nearly 30 years
- the ground was selected because it was near a cemetery for those who had been buried where they fell had been uncovered by farmers plowing. The monument told who the cemetery had been set up for, something that was mainly known only to the women who kept it up.
 

Andersonh1

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The passing of the Confederate, by R. Walter Townsend,
suggested by the account given of the decrepit appearance of the Confederate veterans, during their march through the streets of Lumberton, N.C., at the unveiling of a monument to the memory of the Confederate dead from Robeson County, May 10, 1907.

Townsend, Richard Walter, 1859-
New York, The Neale Publishing Company, 1911.

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/loc.ark:/13960/t8df77w0d
I tried looking up Richard Walter Townsend to see if I could learn anything about him, but he seems mainly known for this poem. He does have a Find a Grave entry, but there is not much additional information available there: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/41852804/richard-walter-townsend

Though the poem contained in this volume was inspired by the sight of veterans at a monument dedication, there's very little in it about the monument itself. It's all about the former Confederate soldiers at the end of their lives. But there is a bit that seems to me to note the purpose of physical monuments to remind us of the lives of these men. This seems to me to refer more to a gravestone than one of the common monuments, but since many of these monuments were intended as common gravestones for the dead who never came home and whose final resting place was not known, the effect of both is often the same. I appreciate these thoughts from a less cynical and more sentimental age.

Go then, Confederate, to thy grave,​
Let conqueror's flag o'er country wave.​
But Merit's self will mark the place,​
Which ends for thee life's manly race;​
There shrubbery green and flowers fair,​
Adorn the scene, perfume the air;​
Let lettered tomb and quiet shade,
There holy contemplation aid,
Save funeral hymn and trill of bird,​
No note above thy sleep be heard.​
Yet lovelier will the spot appear
Before the face that holds a tear,
Whose low, bereaved and broken tone,
Dwells on the faith of him that's gone;
For Her no beauty lights the eye,​
But seems transplanted from the sky,​
As glimpses of unbroken love,​
Break through the broken clouds above,​
While wistful yearnings wing each day,​
Which counts Death's short divide away.​
Above thy bones be envy hushed,​
By earth's damp sod be malice crushed,​
There grace to recreant souls be given,​
To turn with new resolves to Heaven,​
While War's seared woundings heal away,​
Like turf-grown scars on battle clay.​
Such be thy blessing, such thy rest!​

And then this stanza is clearly about the monuments to the Confederate dead.

Such be the symbol of our fate,​
Whose grim result we would abate,​
Though worse than vain 'twould be to boast,​
Since all for what we fought is lost.​
E'en in the monuments we raise,
The valor of our dead to praise,
We dumb confess that but the stone
Doth witness of the cause overthrown,
As the cold tomb but stands instead,​
Where hope has lived, but life has fled.​
 

Andersonh1

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Address at the dedication of the Confederate Memorial Hall, Lincolnton,
N.C., August 27th, 1908 / by Alfred Nixon.
Nixon, Alfred, b. 1856.
[Lincolnton, N.C.] : Southern Stars Chapter U.D.C., [1908]

https://hdl.handle.net/2027/nc01.ark:/13960/t5t737j26
Alfred Nixon was a local official and historian in Lincoln County, NC. In addition to this speech, he compiled a roster of Confederate soldiers from Lincoln County, and he published a book of "great events in North Carolina". https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/nixon-alfred

The booklet lists the order of service:

Opening Prayer - Rev. W. R. Minter
Hymn - "For All The Saints Who From Their Labors Rest."
Introduction - Judge W. A. Hoke
Address - A. Nixon
Hymn - "My Country 'Tis Of Thee."
Benediction - Rev. Robert McMullen

From Nixon's address:

It is with a feeling of peculiar pride and pleasure that I address you on this occasion. In the acquisition of this building as a Memorial Hall I congratulate you. Although Lincoln county is a little behind her sister counties in erecting a Monument to her Confederate Heroes, I believe it will have the most unique, the most extensive, the most instructive, of any; a monument that will not only serve to remind succeeding generations of our love and reverence for the followers of Lee and Jackson, but one —if you receive that encouragement and assistance you so richly deserve, and your plans are carried out—that will perpetuate to the most distant time the name and service, the valor and patriotism of each Lincoln couuty soldier.​
It has been well said, that, "A people who forget their dead deserve themselves to be forgotten." It is eminently right and proper therefore, that Lincoln county should honor and preserve the memory of her Confederate Heroes, and all who aid in this laudable undertaking honor themselves in so doing. This will not only be a fitting Memorial to their patriotic services, but ever a high and perpetual incentive to the living to lead such lives, and, if duty calls, to devote themselves to their country's service.​

Nixon went on to discuss the reunited country, the service of former Confederates, and the history of the building being dedicated as a Confederate memorial hall, a former Academy, leased to the UDC in 1908 by the trustees of that Academy for the purpose of a Memorial Hall for the veterans of that county. He then went through some of the names of those who had taught at the school, and noted that the UDC had a 99 year lease with an option to renew. It makes me wonder about the history of this building, and if it's still in existence and the lease held by the UDC. Though he could find the records of teachers, he could not begin to call the roll of all the students who attended the school over the years. He is able to name a number of notable ones, including a number who answered the call of their State and became Confederate soldiers.

Nixon notes that the UDC are conserving and making history by taking possession of the hall and the associated documentation of its history. He runs through a number of these documents and mentions the following:

9. The manuscript of the address delivered by General Robert D. Johnston to the survivors of his old command in Lincolnton, July 11th, 1908, in which he commends your undertaking in the following words: "I had the pleasure yesterday to visit the old Academy Hall, which has been dedicated as a receptacle of memorials of Confederate veterans. It is a wiser and happier way of preserving the records and history of the war. I cordially commend the example of the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Lincoln county to their sister Associations. Such a receptacle of the relics of the war will be a perpetual object lesson to our children of their father's memories. It will afford me great pleasure if I can find something of mine worthy of a place in this Memorial Hall."​

Nixon concludes with the following statement:

In St. Paul's Cathedral, London, the body of the architect lies beneath a plain stone slab. Upon a tablet are the words: "If you would seek a monument look around." The great dome swells above, the vast walls stretch about. In the creation of his genius Christopher Wren has a fitting and everlasting Memorial. Our minds this evening have dwelt upon the past. We have remembered some of the dead and the living. I hope you will so adorn these walls with the faces of Lincoln county's soldiers, and with the story of their services, that should a stranger come within our gates and inquire: "Where is your Confederate Monument?" you can bring him here and answer: "Look around."​
 

Andersonh1

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Viper21

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Not sure if this applies to this thread or not. I'll let @Andersonh1 confirm or deny it's relevance.

I posted some pictures I took today, of the Robert E. Lee monument (Charlottesville, VA) in the thread about the new changes to the Monument law in Virginia. I started to post the following in it but, thought it might be more relevant in this thread.

I've pulled the folllowing excerpts from Charlottesville City's own website:

On May 28, 1917,
Paul McIntire purchased a city block that encompassed 45,435 square feet bound by Jefferson and Market Streets and by First and Second Streets, NE. On the lot stood the 1829 Southall-Venable home which was owned by the Charles S. Venable family. The house was a two story brick dwelling surrounded by several smaller outbuildings and beautiful gardens containing fir, oak, and weeping willow trees. During the following year, McIntire had the dwelling demolished and created a formal landscaped square, now known as Market Street Park (formerly known as Lee Park). McIntire gave the site to the City of Charlottesville in order "to erect thereon a statue of General Robert E. Lee and to present said property to the City as a memorial to his parents..."


......Paul McIntire instructed that the local chapters of the Confederate Veterans, Sons of Confederate Veterans and the United Daughters of the Confederacy should have entire charge of planning the exercise for the unveiling of the sculpture in Charlottesville. It was thus presented to the city on May 21, 1924, during a Confederate reunion. As a part of the ceremony, one hundred cadets from the Virginia Military Institute,paraded through the center of Charlottesville decorated with Confederate colors.


The sculpture was presented to the City on behalf of Paul McIntire by Dr. Henry Louis Smith, President of Washington and Lee University. Three-year-old Mary Walker Lee, a great-grand-daughter of General Lee, then pulled the Confederate flag draped over the sculpture away, and the crowd cheered loudly before President Edwin A. Alderman of the University of Virginia made a speech of acceptance for the City of Charlottesville. The afternoon's festivities concluded with a benediction, after which the crowd dispersed to celebrate at a number of parties and balls.


The full article can be read at the City's website here---> https://www.charlottesville.org/dep...park/history-and-gardens-of-emancipation-park

There's much information about the construction of the monument.
 

Andersonh1

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Unveiling of Fort Fisher Monument, June 2, 1932.
[North Carolina : North Carolina Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy?, 1932]

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nc01.ark:/13960/t6qz3k81v
This monument was erected at a later date than most I've looked at so far in this thread. 1932 is 67 years after the war ended, so there would not be very many veterans left alive at that point. This is a short program listing those responsible for the building of the monument and the order of service. You can follow the link to read the entire order of service, but it's notable that the Governor of North Carolina, Max Gardner, spoke at the unveiling, so it was a big enough event to warrant the Governor's attendance. Songs sung include "America", "Bonnie Blue Flag" and of course, "Dixie".

This booklet does not contain the text of the speech. NCPedia gives a few details: https://www.ncpedia.org/monument/1932-fort-fisher

Unveiling & Dedication: On the day of the dedication, the day before the anniversary of Jefferson Davis's birth, North Carolina Governor O. Max Gardner made the dedication speech. He spoke honoring the soldiers of the Confederacy and also praised the historic value of Fort Fisher as a strategic stronghold throughout the war. He commented that the difficult effort to hold the fort represented American strength. Mrs. Glenn Long, the president of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, also made a passionate speech on the importance of preserving Confederate heritage in the permanence of stone (SanCartier, p. 36). Many attended the dedication, including four veterans of the war, as well as many prominent members of the military and the United Daughters of the Confederacy. An invocation was delivered by the Reverend Thomas C. Darst.​
There is also a little bit of information here: https://books.google.com/books?id=5c5sc9s4wdAC&pg=PA212&lpg=PA212&dq=Fort+Fisher+confederate+monument++Mrs.+Glenn+Long&source=bl&ots=sOLb4N6yJy&sig=ACfU3U11cyGUJAkF0XaJgtotH728_7G5NA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjl96vxyf7oAhUCVN8KHehjBVkQ6AEwAnoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=Fort Fisher confederate monument Mrs. Glenn Long&f=false

The Governor's speech can be found on page 442 of this book: https://digital.ncdcr.gov/digital/collection/p249901coll22/id/425177

Just as in the order of service we see both songs to America and to the South, Gardner notes that "... Americans, actuated by the highest sense of duty, fought on each side." at Fort Fisher. "A noble sentiment brings us here today to commemorate the courage and the patriotism of those who died at the Battle of Fort Fisher... the quality of patriotism exhibited by those who fought at Fort Fisher more than justifies commemoration in the monument which we dedicate here today."
 
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Andersonh1

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The ideal Confederate soldier, address : unveiling Confederate monument,
Cornelius, N.C., August 4th, 1910
/ by Armistead Burwell.
Burwell, Armistead, 1839-1913.
[Cornelius, N.C.? : s.n., 1910]

https://hdl.handle.net/2027/nc01.ark:/13960/t47q0b197
Armistead Burwell (October 22, 1839 – May 13, 1913) was a teacher, Confederate soldier, lawyer, state senator, and associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. He was in Company A, 3rd Arkansas cavalry. One of his law partners after the war was Zebulon Vance, former wartime governor of North Carolina.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armistead_Burwell_(judge)
As a former Confederate soldier, and nearing the end of his life, Burwell spoke at this monument unveiling and was able to draw on personal experience to give his remarks. And he notes in the third paragraph of his speech that the generation passing away is formally committing the keeping of the history to the younger generation, who must pass it on in turn. This is the first speech I've read that directly addresses slavery as it relates to the Confederate soldier.

... we have assembled here that, by fitting ceremony, we may dedicate to its pious purpose this monument, which stands today because of the loving labors of a few devoted members of our little band....​
--------------------​
For it is well that here, upon this spot hallowed to so many within the range of my sight by precious memories, a shaft to the honor of the Confederate soldier shall stand, surmounted by his effigy, in perpetual remembrance of his virtues, displayed as they were, both in war and in peace, and recorded, and told, and sung, as they are, in the history, the literature, the poetry and the music, of this great, this glorious, this now united, nation.​
--------------------​
For this shaft is surmounted by the effigy of no particular officer or soldier, but is intended to stand for that composite ideality, and to remind Passing generations of his aims his true Purposes, and his wonderful accomplishments.​
But before I begin the enumeration of those virtues which this ideal has represented, and does now represent, I ask your indulgence while, in this presence and at the foot of this monument, I declare that this "idea Confederate soldier" was neither an advocate of human slavery, nor a favorer of the disruption of the Union of the States.​
I do not speak of, or for, the Confederate politician or statement, but for the ideal of those boys and men who, leaving father, mother, sister, wife or children to the care of that God in whom they had been taught to trust, went forth from happy homes beneath this Southern sky to the weariness of bivouac and battlefield, to find rest only in a soldier's grave, or in a home to which desolation had come, but into which despair was not allowed to enter.​
By force of circumstances the ideal Confederate soldier was a defender of slavery. He was not its willing advocate.​
What does Judge Burwell say that the Confederate monument represents?
Therefore let this silent messenger speak for you, my comrades, to the men and women of this time, and to those coming after them, of courage - not only of that spirit which disdains danger, but of that better spirit which stands calm and unmoved as well in defeat as in victory, in darkness as in light, in poverty as in wealth, and impels its possessor under all circumstances, however humble, or however exalted his place may be, to do the full duty of a man.​
Unfortunately, amid the otherwise high ideals is a mention of racial purity, indicating that Judge Burwell does see this as a monument for white men, or that's how I read the "Saxon blood" comment anyway.
Be reminded by this silent soldier - who, great as he was in war, was greater in peace - to be brave when danger appears, to bear with fortitude the ills of life, if ills, under God's providence, shall come - to love home and its purity - to protect from taint the Saxon blood that courses in your veins - to be, in fine, men and women worthy of the heritage of fame which this "Ideal Confederate Soldier" won for his Sunny South, and gave to her people, and to the people of all this great nation.​
 
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Andersonh1

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Souvenir Unveiling Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Richmond, Virginia May 30, 1894

https://chpn.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/souvenirunveilin00conf.pdf
This is exactly what it says on the cover, a souvenir booklet filled with art, ads, and a history of the monument. The booklet contains also poetry, photographs of those involved, and photos of other monuments.

The Confederate Soldiers' and Sailors Monument Association was organized in December 1887 by five men, and the stated purpose was as follows:

"'Resolved, That we do hereby organize ourselves into an association to be known as ' The Confederate Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Association.' The object of the Association is to raise money for the erection on Libby' s Hill, in this city, of a Monument to perpetuate the memory and deeds of the Private Soldiers and Sailors of the Confederate States.​

That's pretty straightforward. They went about raising funds and securing the location, and coordinating with the Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans. The design adopted as a model Pompey's Pillar near Alexandria Egypt, and the intention was for each of the 13 States of the CSA to each contribute a block of stone. The entire cost of the monument was nearly $30,000, which was a tremendous amount of money in that era. The work was carried on by the members of the Association, but the funding was a community project. The monument was a tribute to the dead, but also the still-living Confederate veterans.

There are hundreds of persons whose names we cannot record here who will look upon this completed shaft and derive quiet satisfaction from the knowledge they have of their own sacrifices made in order to contribute their share to the upraising of a dignified and enduring monument to the Confederate soldiers who have laid down their lives, and to those also who now await their call to the Great Assembly. The inscriptions on the Monument are purposely brief and simple, but yet comprehensive. Let him who looks upon this shaft seek the history of the men it memoriahzes in the many books which have come from the hearts of those who survived the downfall of their country.​

Robert E. Lee's farewell address to his army is included about halfway through the booklet, along with a photo of the Lee monument in Richmond (and I had no idea how large it was, but there is a man standing at the base which gives an idea of the scale of the Lee memorial.) This is followed by poetry, photos of Jackson and other CS leaders, and some pages of random facts. The drawing of the Great Seal of the Confederate States does not feature George Washington, interestingly, but some other soldier that I don't recognize. I've never seen this version before.

But their memories e'er shall remain for us.​
And their names, bright names, without stain for us;​
The glory they won shall not wane for us,​
In legend and lay​
Our heroes in Gray​
Shall forever live over again for us.​
 

Paul Yancey

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Kentucky
Souvenir Unveiling Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Richmond, Virginia May 30, 1894

https://chpn.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/souvenirunveilin00conf.pdf
This is exactly what it says on the cover, a souvenir booklet filled with art, ads, and a history of the monument. The booklet contains also poetry, photographs of those involved, and photos of other monuments.

The Confederate Soldiers' and Sailors Monument Association was organized in December 1887 by five men, and the stated purpose was as follows:

"'Resolved, That we do hereby organize ourselves into an association to be known as ' The Confederate Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument Association.' The object of the Association is to raise money for the erection on Libby' s Hill, in this city, of a Monument to perpetuate the memory and deeds of the Private Soldiers and Sailors of the Confederate States.​

That's pretty straightforward. They went about raising funds and securing the location, and coordinating with the Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans. The design adopted as a model Pompey's Pillar near Alexandria Egypt, and the intention was for each of the 13 States of the CSA to each contribute a block of stone. The entire cost of the monument was nearly $30,000, which was a tremendous amount of money in that era. The work was carried on by the members of the Association, but the funding was a community project. The monument was a tribute to the dead, but also the still-living Confederate veterans.

There are hundreds of persons whose names we cannot record here who will look upon this completed shaft and derive quiet satisfaction from the knowledge they have of their own sacrifices made in order to contribute their share to the upraising of a dignified and enduring monument to the Confederate soldiers who have laid down their lives, and to those also who now await their call to the Great Assembly. The inscriptions on the Monument are purposely brief and simple, but yet comprehensive. Let him who looks upon this shaft seek the history of the men it memoriahzes in the many books which have come from the hearts of those who survived the downfall of their country.​

Robert E. Lee's farewell address to his army is included about halfway through the booklet, along with a photo of the Lee monument in Richmond (and I had no idea how large it was, but there is a man standing at the base which gives an idea of the scale of the Lee memorial.) This is followed by poetry, photos of Jackson and other CS leaders, and some pages of random facts. The drawing of the Great Seal of the Confederate States does not feature George Washington, interestingly, but some other soldier that I don't recognize. I've never seen this version before.

But their memories e'er shall remain for us.​
And their names, bright names, without stain for us;​
The glory they won shall not wane for us,​
In legend and lay​
Our heroes in Gray​
Shall forever live over again for us.​
The attached souvenir booklet is very interesting and well worth the time to read. A lot of hard work and effort by a good many people went into the raising of this monument. I am grateful for their efforts.
 

Viper21

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