I'm a Good Ole Rebel

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#21
Considering this ditty was written during the war, I kind of cut the author a little slack! The former state anthem of Maryland was not exactly patriotic for the Union, either... Jefferson Davis wouldn't have sung I'm A Good Ole Rebel - he believed the Confederacy was following the spirit of the US Constitution and the intent of the original Founders. Wrote a real tome about that, too! (Rather dreary, I must say, though.)
Not so sure that this ditty was written during the War. It references the Freedman's Bureau, which wasn't implemented until after March, 1865.
 

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unionblue

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#22
The man who wrote the poem, was entitled to his opinions because of the spirit of the Declaration of Independence and because of the rights protected under Constitution of the United States.

That's what makes the publication of this poem all the more remarkable, even if it was published years after the war.

Unionblue
 

Old_Glory

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#24
I do not agree with the lyrics, but what happened to him didn't happen to me. Had I lived through what he saw people do in the name of the Constitution, who knows what. This writer is linking America and it's symbols to the Yankees, but America and it's symbols represent all states Confederate and Union. I hope he understood this before he died and didn't take those feelings to his grave.
 

diane

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#25
Yes, after looking further, you're right! The source I had when I posted said it was written during the war and edited by his son afterward. But further research finds this is what he wrote after the war! Thanks.
 
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#26
There were quite a few upset about there future under Yankee rule.

Edmund Ruffin's suicide note:

"And now with my latest writing and utterance, and with what will [be] near to my latest breath, I here repeat, & would willingly proclaim, my unmitigated hatred to Yankee rule—to all political, social and business connections with Yankees, & to the perfidious, malignant, & vile Yankee race"
 

judi

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#27
I always liked the song and just figured it was written by someone who really never got over the war.

Husband on the other hand thought including the Constitution and Declaration of Independence was alittle over the top.
 

Lazy Bayou

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#29
I like the song and I can understand holding on to bitter feelings. Hell, most country music songs tend to follow along.
I agree. Just pull up Waylon Jennings on UTube. He's got several "rebel" songs on there. Also try Hank Jr's "If the south would have won we'd have it made"
 
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#30
Does anyone else have a problem with this song? Even when I was pro-Confederate, I had a problem with the parts where he "hates the Constitution" and "hates the Declaration of Independence, too," specifically. I would expect a certain amount of animosity, but not towards the Constitution and the DOI. The lyrics were found here: http://www.dixiescv.org/ole-rebel.html.

I'm a Good Ole Rebel
by Major James Innes Randolph, CSA
First published in 1914, this song expresses the feelings of the old CSA Veterans.
Oh, I'm a good old Rebel,
Now that's just what I am;
For this "fair land of Freedom"
I do not care a d*mn.
I'm glad I fit against it-
I only wish we'd won.
And I don't want no pardon
For anything I've done.

I hates the Constitution,
This great Republic too;
I hates the Freedmen's Buro,
In uniforms of blue.
I hates the nasty eagle,
With all his brag and fuss;
But the lyin', thievin' Yankees
I hates' em wuss and wuss.

I hates the Yankee nation
and everything they do,
I hates the Declaration
of Independence, too;
I hates the glorious Union
tis drippin' with our blood
I hates their striped banner,
I fit it all I could.

I followed Ol' Marsh Roberts
for four years, nearabout,
got wounded in three places
and starved at P'int Lookout:
I cotched the rheumatism
a'campin' in the snow;
but I killed a chance o' Yankees,
I'd like to kill some mo'.

We got three hundred thousand
Befo' they conquered us.
They died of Southern fever
And Southern steel and shot;
And I wish it was three million
Instead of what we got.

I can't take up my musket
And fight' em now no mo',
But I ain't a-goin'to love' em,
Now that is sartin sho';
And I don't want no pardon
For what I was and am;
And I won't be reconstructed,
And I do not give a d*mn.
Personally I enjoyed hearing the song, I still do. The exception is when it attacks the Constitution and the Declaration of Independance, those are two of the greatest documents ever written and no good Southerner should be able to express condemnation of them.
 

ole

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#31
All kinds of freaks out there Reb. Be thankful that there are very few, and that no one associates you with them.
 
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#32
The constitution is a lot like the bible. Lots of people revere it and love the thought of it but not so many actually pay much attention to whats in it.
 

cash

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#33
Does anyone else have a problem with this song? Even when I was pro-Confederate, I had a problem with the parts where he "hates the Constitution" and "hates the Declaration of Independence, too," specifically. I would expect a certain amount of animosity, but not towards the Constitution and the DOI. The lyrics were found here: http://www.dixiescv.org/ole-rebel.html.

I'm a Good Ole Rebel
by Major James Innes Randolph, CSA
First published in 1914, this song expresses the feelings of the old CSA Veterans.
Oh, I'm a good old Rebel,
Now that's just what I am;
For this "fair land of Freedom"
I do not care a d*mn.
I'm glad I fit against it-
I only wish we'd won.
And I don't want no pardon
For anything I've done.

I hates the Constitution,
This great Republic too;
I hates the Freedmen's Buro,
In uniforms of blue.
I hates the nasty eagle,
With all his brag and fuss;
But the lyin', thievin' Yankees
I hates' em wuss and wuss.

I hates the Yankee nation
and everything they do,
I hates the Declaration
of Independence, too;
I hates the glorious Union
tis drippin' with our blood
I hates their striped banner,
I fit it all I could.

I followed Ol' Marsh Roberts
for four years, nearabout,
got wounded in three places
and starved at P'int Lookout:
I cotched the rheumatism
a'campin' in the snow;
but I killed a chance o' Yankees,
I'd like to kill some mo'.

We got three hundred thousand
Befo' they conquered us.
They died of Southern fever
And Southern steel and shot;
And I wish it was three million
Instead of what we got.

I can't take up my musket
And fight' em now no mo',
But I ain't a-goin'to love' em,
Now that is sartin sho';
And I don't want no pardon
For what I was and am;
And I won't be reconstructed,
And I do not give a d*mn.
What else would you expect from a traitor to the United States? I'm sure what he hated most about the DoI was the part that said "All Men are Created Equal."
 
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#34
I just noticed that this is a different version of the song than the one I grew up with. That one goes like this.

Oh, I'm a good old rebel, Now thats just what I am,
And for this yankee nation, I do not give a ****.
I'm glad I fought against her, I only wish we won.
I aint asked any pardon for anything I've done.

I hates the yankee nation and eveything they do.
I hates the declaration of independence, too.
I hates the glorious union, just dripping with our blood.
I hates the striped banner, and fought her all I could

I road with Robert E. Lee, For three years, thereabout.
Got wounded in four places, And I starved at point lookout.
I caught the Romatism Campin' in the snow.
But I killed a chance of Yankees And I'd like to kill some more.

3 hundred thousand Yankees Is stiff in southern dust.
We got 3 hundred thousand Before they conquered us
They died of Southern Fever And southern steel and shot
I wish there were 3 million Instead of what we got.


I can't pick up my musket And fight 'um down no more
But I ain't gonna love 'um Now that is certain sure
And I don't want no pardon For what I was and am
I won't be reconstruted And I do not give a ****
Oh, I'm a good old rebel, Now thats just what I am,
And for this yankee nation, I do no give a ****. I
'm glad I fought a against her, I only wish we won.
I aint asked any pardon for anything I've done.
I aint asked any pardon for anything I've done.

Looking at it again, I forgot about all the killing in it. That is the other part that doesn't sit too well with me.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
michigan
#35
I don't have a problem with it. Assuming he had bad feelings about the north invading the South, and if he and/or his family suffered at the hands of the yankee troops during the war, then there would be grounds for animosity. Add to it whatever he and his family might have endured during reconstruction. And I don't care what his war record was.

I put a request for leave written by my great-grandfather in another thread expressing a similar attitude. He was well educated and didn't own any slaves, but he really had strong words about the enemy.

Robert
The reason I wanted to know his war record, I would look it up myself but dont have the resource, was to better understand the man. Did he serve with Lee for 4 years, be wounded 3 times,? What does it mean to kill a (chance o Yankees)? Did he surrender, sign a oath of allegiance, be pardoned? Just would like to know some of his history. Knowing the history of the author of any poem/song can add meaning to the piece. Example: If you didnt know Scott Francis Key was aboard a British ship during the bombing of US Fort McHenry during the war of 1812 would you have a clue what the Star Spangled Banner meant.

Randolph was born in 1837 making him 24 when the war broke out. He went to two schools, Hobart College in Geneva and then law school in New York so he must of lived in the North just prior to the war. Did he acquire some of his hatred there? I would think being able to afford college and law school out of state he came from a family of some means. He worked for the Richmond Examiner after the war until he moved to Baltimore being a attorney and working at a newspaper until his death in 1887.
So knowing his war record, life before and after the war, would make me better understand his position.
 

K Hale

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#37
I agree. Just pull up Waylon Jennings on UTube. He's got several "rebel" songs on there. Also try Hank Jr's "If the south would have won we'd have it made"
It all comes across as a lot of whining, especially at this late date. I wonder who Hank thinks "we" are.
 

unionblue

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#39
I view in the vein a man (or woman) has a right to their feelings.

Feelings are not about the law or a specific document, they are as personal to human beings as a person's heartbeat.

The man participated in a lost cause, one which I will not feel sorry for having been beaten and defeated, but I can understand, from a distance, the hate and rage one might feel at being on a losing side, especially after all the pain and sacrifice would suffer supporting that cause and then seeing it end in ashes. That kind of bitterness could consume one's soul and could only be expressed with bitter feelings.

Anyone remember the other saying from a Confederate soldier after the end of the war? The one where he said he went to war because he loved his country, but that he would be ****ed if he would love another one? I can identify with that man, again for pretty much the same reasons. A young man embraces a cause with all that bright-eyed hope and enthusiasm of youth, and then is forced to embrace the bitter reality of loss and defeat. Could be quite a long fall from the heady days of April, 1861 to April, 1865.

Imagine the personal loss of friends, family, home and a way of life that would never come again, and then the stark realization you lived through all of that loss and now face the uncertain future as part of a defeated people.

Frankly, the poem says much about the spirit of the composer in the face of all of that bitter defeat and the life lost forever because of it.

I think I can understand the feelings there, but would pray they would give way to another one.

"...The duty of its citizens, then, appears to me too plain to admit of doubt. All should unite in honest efforts to obilterate the effects of the war and to restore the blessing of peace. They should remain, if possible, in the country; promote harmony and good feeling, qualify themselves to vote and elect to the State and general legislatures wise and patriotic men, who will devote their abilities to the interests of the country and the healing of all dissensions. I have invariably recommended this course since the cessation of hostilities, and have endeavoured to practise it myself..." Robert E. Lee, letter to Gov. Letcher.

"The surrender of the Confederate armies in 1865 involved:
1. The surrender of the claim to the right of secession.
2. The surrender of the former political relations of the negro.
3. The surrender of the Southern Confederacy.
These issues expired on the fields last occupied by the Confederate armies. There they should have been buried. The soldier prefers to have the sod that receives him when he falls cover his remains. The political questions of the war should have been buried upon the fields that marked their end." Longstreet, Letter to the New Orleans Times, 19 March, 1867.

"The highest of human laws is the law that is established by appeal to arms.
The sword has decided in favor of the North, and what they claimed as principles cease to be principles, and are become law. The views that we hold cease to be principles because they are opposed to law. It is our duty to abandon ideas that are obsolete and conform to the requirements of law." Longstreet, Letter to the New Orleans Times, 8 June, 1867.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 
Joined
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Messages
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#40
I view in the vein a man (or woman) has a right to their feelings.

Feelings are not about the law or a specific document, they are as personal to human beings as a person's heartbeat.

The man participated in a lost cause, one which I will not feel sorry for having been beaten and defeated, but I can understand, from a distance, the hate and rage one might feel at being on a losing side, especially after all the pain and sacrifice would suffer supporting that cause and then seeing it end in ashes. That kind of bitterness could consume one's soul and could only be expressed with bitter feelings.

Anyone remember the other saying from a Confederate soldier after the end of the war? The one where he said he went to war because he loved his country, but that he would be ****ed if he would love another one? I can identify with that man, again for pretty much the same reasons. A young man embraces a cause with all that bright-eyed hope and enthusiasm of youth, and then is forced to embrace the bitter reality of loss and defeat. Could be quite a long fall from the heady days of April, 1861 to April, 1865.

Imagine the personal loss of friends, family, home and a way of life that would never come again, and then the stark realization you lived through all of that loss and now face the uncertain future as part of a defeated people.

Frankly, the poem says much about the spirit of the composer in the face of all of that bitter defeat and the life lost forever because of it.

I think I can understand the feelings there, but would pray they would give way to another one.

"...The duty of its citizens, then, appears to me too plain to admit of doubt. All should unite in honest efforts to obilterate the effects of the war and to restore the blessing of peace. They should remain, if possible, in the country; promote harmony and good feeling, qualify themselves to vote and elect to the State and general legislatures wise and patriotic men, who will devote their abilities to the interests of the country and the healing of all dissensions. I have invariably recommended this course since the cessation of hostilities, and have endeavoured to practise it myself..." Robert E. Lee, letter to Gov. Letcher.

"The surrender of the Confederate armies in 1865 involved:
1. The surrender of the claim to the right of secession.
2. The surrender of the former political relations of the negro.
3. The surrender of the Southern Confederacy.
These issues expired on the fields last occupied by the Confederate armies. There they should have been buried. The soldier prefers to have the sod that receives him when he falls cover his remains. The political questions of the war should have been buried upon the fields that marked their end." Longstreet, Letter to the New Orleans Times, 19 March, 1867.

"The highest of human laws is the law that is established by appeal to arms.
The sword has decided in favor of the North, and what they claimed as principles cease to be principles, and are become law. The views that we hold cease to be principles because they are opposed to law. It is our duty to abandon ideas that are obsolete and conform to the requirements of law." Longstreet, Letter to the New Orleans Times, 8 June, 1867.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
Neil,I don't believe Larry could have expressed those sentiments any better than you did... thank you

Ed
 


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