Illustrations of Grant's First Swearing In March 4, 1869


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Cavalry Charger

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#3
Great images, Pat, and imagine walking into the White House for the first time knowing the responsibility that went with that.

I wonder if he felt overwhelmed in the circumstances? I'm sure he did. The expectations would be huge.

Not that he hadn't had huge expectations placed on his shoulders before.

But he was now in a different theatre ... a political rather than a military one. I wonder how well prepared he really felt, regardless of believing that it was the only way to keep the country on the steady course it had in some ways achieved at the end of the war?

I must see what else I can find around this.
 

Pat Young

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#7
Great images, Pat, and imagine walking into the White House for the first time knowing the responsibility that went with that.

I wonder if he felt overwhelmed in the circumstances? I'm sure he did. The expectations would be huge.

Not that he hadn't had huge expectations placed on his shoulders before.

But he was now in a different theatre ... a political rather than a military one. I wonder how well prepared he really felt, regardless of believing that it was the only way to keep the country on the steady course it had in some ways achieved at the end of the war?

I must see what else I can find around this.
That would be good.
 

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I must see what else I can find around this.
Well, I've found a little more from Julia's point of view.

"General Sherman said to me once, soon after the nomination, 'Mrs Grant, you must now be prepared to have your husband's character thoroughly sifted.' 'Why, General,' I exclaimed, 'General Grant is my Admiral Crichton. He does all things well. He is brave; he is kind; he is just; he is true.' The General, smiling at my enthusiasm said: 'Oh, my dear lady, it is not what he has done, but what they will say he has done, and they will prove too that Grant is a very bad man indeed. The fact is, you will be astonished to find what a bad man you have for a husband.' And I was astonished, but like the General, I grew not to mind it."

Sherman appears to be talking about character assassination. He is trying to prepare Julia, who struggles with any kind of criticism of her husband, for what is to come.

"The General was triumphantly elected and on March 4, 1869, was inaugurated President of the United States. General Grant left his residence on I street in his own carriage accompanied by some friends. I know he did not ride up to the Capitol with the ex-President. He absolutely refused to do so. I went with a large party to the Capitol, where I heard the oath of office and listened with pride and emotion to the first inaugural address of my husband, the President. He stood for a moment, then bowed his acknowledgement to the wild huzzas of the great throng gathered around the Capitol. He received the greetings of a few friends standing near, then he turned and, hastening towards me, he stooped and kissed me on the cheek and, with a pleasant smile, handed me his first inaugural address. He passed on and drove in his own carriage to the White House. I returned with my party to our residence in I street."

It's lovely to hear from Julia's perspective how they experienced the day. And how proud she was of him.

The Personal Memoirs of Julia Dent Grant
 

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