Ideological factors partially account for the end of slavery in the North


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trice

Lt. Colonel
Joined
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11,472
#62
Interestingly Vermont was the only colony/state that didn't have a coastline.
Interestingly, Vermont was neither a state nor a colony at the time.

In 1763, at the close of the French and Indian War, the area we now call Vermont was essentially a no-man's land. IIRR, there may have been less than 100 white (non-Native American) people living there at that point. The area was claimed by New York, New Hampshire and even some in Connecticut (Massachusetts claim having been denied by a British court in the 1741 when the NH-MA border was settled).

CT's claim vanished after the American Revolution (or at least I can't even find a whisper of talk about it). NY and VT negotiated a settlement of NY's claim (NY was blocking VT's admission as a state) in October of 1790, allowing VT to become a state in 1791. The NY-VT border was finalized in 1812.

The NH-VT border was finally settled by a US Supreme Court ruling in the 1930s.
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Messages
19,482
Location
Laurinburg NC
#63
Interestingly, Vermont was neither a state nor a colony at the time.

In 1763, at the close of the French and Indian War, the area we now call Vermont was essentially a no-man's land. IIRR, there may have been less than 100 white (non-Native American) people living there at that point. The area was claimed by New York, New Hampshire and even some in Connecticut (Massachusetts claim having been denied by a British court in the 1741 when the NH-MA border was settled).

CT's claim vanished after the American Revolution (or at least I can't even find a whisper of talk about it). NY and VT negotiated a settlement of NY's claim (NY was blocking VT's admission as a state) in October of 1790, allowing VT to become a state in 1791. The NY-VT border was finalized in 1812.

The NH-VT border was finally settled by a US Supreme Court ruling in the 1930s.
Thanks for the information.
 

OpnCoronet

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
10,333
#64
He may have, however his Racial attitudes were little different from Jefferson’s.
I’ve studied the Revolutionary War and Race. Negros nor Native Americans were to be Included. Even those who were Anti Slavery thought they should be Removed. So, that as a Revolutionary Principle would mirror Lincoln.




The view that Lincoln may have had racist feelings, does not, in any way, proved that he did not 'hate' slavery for ideological reasons was sincere, nor, that because one was a racist means approval of slavery. The DoI could not be convincingly held up as an exemplar of the precepts and ideals of what a country dedicated to the right of all men to be free, looked like.

I suggest, your historical study seems deficient on this particular matter. You might read Justice Mac Lean's and Curtis's rebuttal of Taney's reasoning on the Dred Scott Decision., i.e., the found evidence that blacks were considered citizens of some states and had the franchise, arguing that if that were so, , then it can be presumed that they exercised it.
 
Joined
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#65
Interestingly, Vermont was neither a state nor a colony at the time.

In 1763, at the close of the French and Indian War, the area we now call Vermont was essentially a no-man's land. IIRR, there may have been less than 100 white (non-Native American) people living there at that point. The area was claimed by New York, New Hampshire and even some in Connecticut (Massachusetts claim having been denied by a British court in the 1741 when the NH-MA border was settled).

CT's claim vanished after the American Revolution (or at least I can't even find a whisper of talk about it). NY and VT negotiated a settlement of NY's claim (NY was blocking VT's admission as a state) in October of 1790, allowing VT to become a state in 1791. The NY-VT border was finalized in 1812.

The NH-VT border was finally settled by a US Supreme Court ruling in the 1930s.
Connecticut's colonial charter was a sea-to-sea charter and so the colony claimed land all over the place. In Pennsylvania alone, they claimed the Wyoming Valley and the Ohio River Valley and sent settlers there in Connecticut's name. There were more than a few killings between Connecticut and Pennsylvania settlers that were attributed to "Indian raids".

Ryan
 



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