Identifying a Soldier--General States Rights Gist?

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Kathymarie3392

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I have replied on a couple of previous posts discussing General States Rights Gist but I also wanted to create a post to see if everyone could give me their opinion. I recently started researching a very old album that has been in the family for a long time. I am looking for information in identifying a soldier. I didn't realize that the writing on the back was a name. Or two names.. The back reads Gen. States Gist OR W..??? Campbell? There are some pictures of General States Rights Gist across the internet and I think there is definitely a resemblance? What do you all think?
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Mike Serpa

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lelliott19

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The second name on the CDV looks like it could be Nuewringer or Nuemringer? That wide-spaced script is very hard to decipher. Regarding the handwriting, Im not a handwriting comparison expert, but if you'd like my opinion anyway, I think comparison of the unknown salutation "With kindest regards" to the known SR Gist example would be considered inconclusive. There are some similarities: formation of the lower case "r"; the extended crossbar on the "t"; the formation of the quick hump of the "h", etc. It'd be great if we could compare the actual words "With kindest regards" from a known example. But with what we have, I vote for inconclusive - not enough to work with. But it's just my non-professional opinion. :D
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I have replied on a couple of previous posts discussing General States Rights Gist but I also wanted to create a post to see if everyone could give me their opinion. I recently started researching a very old album that has been in the family for a long time. I am looking for information in identifying a soldier. I didn't realize that the writing on the back was a name. Or two names.. The back reads Gen. States Gist OR W..??? Campbell? There are some pictures of General States Rights Gist across the internet and I think there is definitely a resemblance? What do you all think? View attachment 314475View attachment 314476

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/11425372/william-m_-gist

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Very cool! Thanks for the information!
Here's more, his death is mentioned in the OR:

Fifteenth South Carolina Infantry



Report of Capt. Stephen H. Sheldon, Fifteenth South Carolina
Infantry.

HDQRS. FIFTEENTH SOUTH CAROLINA REGIMENT,
Russellville, Tenn., January 9, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations
of this command from the time of its leaving Chattanooga until the
arrival at this camp:

On the evening of November 4, 1863, pursuant to orders from brigade
headquarters, the regiment took up the line of march with the brigade
for Tyner's Station, on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad.

We arrived within the vicinity of the station on November 5, and on the
7th took the cars for Sweet Water, at which place we arrived on the 8th,
and went into camp in the vicinity of the village.

On the 12th instant, moved with the brigade to Philadelphia, and on the
13th to the vicinity of Morganton, and on the night of the same day
marched to Loudon.

On the 15th, crossed the Tennessee on the pontoon bridge and pursued
after the enemy, who had retreated that morning some 7 miles, when we
halted and remained until morning.

Next day came up with the enemy at Campbell's Station, when the
brigade formed in line of battle. The regiment occupied its proper
position in the line, and with one company thrown forward as
skirmishers advanced with it. The enemy meantime fell back, and the
command after advancing 800 or 900 yards was ordered to halt. We
were then marched by flank some half mile or farther in the direction
the enemy had taken, when we were again formed in line of battle and
ordered to advance on the position the enemy occupied when last seen
before night came on, and which was distinguishable by the camp-fires
they lighted and left burning. Upon reaching this point it was found the
enemy had retreated. The troops were ordered to halt for the night, and
Maj. Gist was also ordered to send six companies forward to picket the
Knoxville road. Companies A, C, B, K, E, and H, under Capt. J. B.
Davis, were ordered to perform this duty.

Resumed the pursuit early next morning, coming up with the enemy's
rear guard some 5 miles from Knoxville. Gen. Kershaw ordered
Maj. Gist to move with his regiment, along with Col. Henagan,
who was ordered to make a detour to the right, and if possible get in the
enemy's rear and attack him, while the rest of the brigade pressed him
in front. Owing to the distance we had to go to get in the rear of the
enemy, they were driven off by the troops that assailed them in front
before we had arrived in the position desired to be occupied, and which
would have cut off the enemy's retreat had we succeeded. The regiment
then marched to rejoin the brigade, which it succeeded in doing shortly
before the column was halted in sight of Fort Loudon.

On the 19th instant, when the brigade advanced on the enemy's position
at Armstrong's house, the regiment occupied the extreme right next the
Holston River. Owing to the nature of the ground in our front, when
near our picket lines the regiment was marched by a flank along the
river bank until the right reached the position occupied by Col.
Henagan on the picket line. Maj. Gist halted the regiment here and
ordered the men to close up, and moving down the line to see that the
order was promptly obeyed, he was shot by one of the enemy's
sharpshooters concealed behind their breastworks in front, and instantly
expired.
The command then devolved upon Capt. J. B. Davis, the
senior officer present. Just at this moment Lieut. Doby, of Gen.
Kershaw's staff, gave Capt. Davis orders to charge the hill in his
front. The order was given and the hill carried with a rush and with but
little resistance from the enemy, who were posted behind the trees and
in the houses about Armstrong's premises. The regiment continued to
press on rapidly until ordered to halt and fall back to Armstrong's
house, where we threw up a sort of breastwork of rails, to be used in
case the enemy should attempt to regain the position.

The regiment lost in that affair its brave and intrepid commander, Maj.
William M. Gist. Company K, of the regiment, which was on picket
duty during the day, had 2 men killed and 4 wounded.


During the siege there were no other casualties in the command, and
nothing occurred in which the regiment was engaged worthy of mention
until the afternoon of December 4. The regiment was on picket that day.

Late in the afternoon the enemy advanced three companies against our
right, where the line was weakest and least protected, evidently with a
view to discover our number and strength. The companies on the right
gave them good information by several well-directed volleys, which
seemed to check their curiosity rather suddenly, and sent them back to
their intrenchments with more haste than is prescribed by tactics for
movements of the kind.

That night, at 11 o'clock, the regiment was withdrawn, under the
direction of Lieut.-Col. Rutherford, of the Third South Carolina
Regiment, in a most successful manner, and without arousing the
suspicions of the enemy as to the nature of our movement. We then
followed on after the brigade, which had preceded us several hours, and
caught up with it next morning about 9 miles northeast of Knoxville.
The regiment continued the marches along with the brigade until we
arrived within 8 miles of Rogersville, where we halted and rested for
several days.

On December 14, accompanied by the rest of the brigade, the command
marched in the direction of Bean's Station. Finding the enemy at this
place, measures were taken to attack, and, if possible, capture him. We
occupied the extreme right, and after the brigade had been put in
position along the slope of the Clinch Mountains we advanced upon the
enemy at a charge and drove him back from his position. We were then
moved farther to the right and again advanced, capturing a few prisoners
and killing and wounding some few. Night coming on soon after, we
were ordered by the general commanding brigade to halt, stack arms,
and rest for the night.

The regiment had only 7 men wounded and none killed.

Remained in the vicinity of Bean's Station until the 20th, when we
received orders to march with the brigade to Long's Ferry.

On the 21st, crossed the Holston, and on the 22d marched to this
camp.

During six weeks of severe campaigning, with many hardships and
deprivations, this command has been particularly fortunate.

Our whole losses since we left Chattanooga are as follows:


Killed. Wounded. Total.
Officers..................... 1 .. 1
Men.......................... 2 11 13
Aggregate............... 3 11 14


The command suffered during the marches for want of shoes and proper
clothing, and oftentimes scarcity of rations. However, these sufferings
were all borne with becoming fortitude by the brave and gallant men,
of which this command is a part, composing this army.

S. H. SHELDON,
Capt., Cmdg. Fifteenth South Carolina Regt.

Capt. C. R. HOLMES, Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 515-54 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLIII.
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part I, Reports and Union Correspondence. Serial No. 54.]
 
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lelliott19

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The companies on the right gave them good information by several well-directed volleys, which seemed to check their curiosity rather suddenly, and sent them back to their intrenchments with more haste than is prescribed by tactics for movements of the kind.
I like the way Capt Sheldon described this encounter. You know how much I like dry humor. :D
 
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