Miniatures I need some advice on how to paint miniatures

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Mr. Cole,
I don't know If I've ever seen you post in this forum before. If you have, then my apologies for not recognizing that. If you just recently found us, then welcome aboard. It sounds like you have some experience and I would love to see some of the things you've done. If it's Civil War related put them in this section, but if they are not CW related, please put them in the non-CW section. That's about the only rule we have here.
Yes. I was worried that I violated the Rule about non-CW figures but I was only trying to show a close-up of the results I obtain from using set of rust application paints. Of course, you don't have a lot of rusty steel in Civil War equipment as you would in steel tanks and cannons of WW2.

No- - I'm not new here. I just not posting a lot because I am not actively modeling and painting. I have posted some photos of the 1/6 Scale Williams Gun cannon that I scratch-built out of plastic. I used a kit that can be found at many battlefield shops for my wheels. I was looking to see if I posted any photos of my weathering techniques on CWTalk but I can't seem to find any.
This link shows a "page" from a forum where I show the wheel and the cannon with basecoat. I weathered both with dry media and some mixed shades.
Link: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/williams-10-ounce-artillery-gun.13171/page-5

I also posted photos of several figures that I own ---some that I painted---in the first 3 pages of the forum on Non-Civil War Figures.
Link: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/share-your-non-civil-war-miniatures-here.167925/

After applying the basecoat to my Carriage, I bought some Vallejo pigments. This photo(below) show results using this. Note I also have Pigment Fixer. That is what I can't seem to get to work.
I dust one a coat of grim and dust but when I apply the wet Fixer, it washes most of it away. Most people tell me either to keep repeating the steps over and over or just dust it on and don't move the model at all. I think the results you see in this photo was attained just by wetting the dry pigments and "painting" it on. Dont' worry---the final product doesn't look so splotchy as it does in this image.

I would like some instructions but it is hard to understand and I need to sit with someone for 5 minutes and watch it done.


Vallejo Paints.JPG
 

Leigh Cole

Private
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
Monroe, MI
Yes. I was worried that I violated the Rule about non-CW figures but I was only trying to show a close-up of the results I obtain from using set of rust application paints. Of course, you don't have a lot of rusty steel in Civil War equipment as you would in steel tanks and cannons of WW2.

No- - I'm not new here. I just not posting a lot because I am not actively modeling and painting. I have posted some photos of the 1/6 Scale Williams Gun cannon that I scratch-built out of plastic. I used a kit that can be found at many battlefield shops for my wheels. I was looking to see if I posted any photos of my weathering techniques on CWTalk but I can't seem to find any.
This link shows a "page" from a forum where I show the wheel and the cannon with basecoat. I weathered both with dry media and some mixed shades.
Link: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/williams-10-ounce-artillery-gun.13171/page-5

I also posted photos of several figures that I own ---some that I painted---in the first 3 pages of the forum on Non-Civil War Figures.
Link: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/share-your-non-civil-war-miniatures-here.167925/

After applying the basecoat to my Carriage, I bought some Vallejo pigments. This photo(below) show results using this. Note I also have Pigment Fixer. That is what I can't seem to get to work.
I dust one a coat of grim and dust but when I apply the wet Fixer, it washes most of it away. Most people tell me either to keep repeating the steps over and over or just dust it on and don't move the model at all. I think the results you see in this photo was attained just by wetting the dry pigments and "painting" it on. Dont' worry---the final product doesn't look so splotchy as it does in this image.

I would like some instructions but it is hard to understand and I need to sit with someone for 5 minutes and watch it done.


View attachment 397283
Right. What I found through experience is I apply the carrier...pigment fixer, white spirits, what have you first then I apply the pigments. Let dry then dust with a large dry soft brush. Now if I want thicker mud, I apply more fixer and do it again. But I own those very pigments! Good stuff!
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Right. What I found through experience is I apply the carrier...pigment fixer, white spirits, what have you first then I apply the pigments. Let dry then dust with a large dry soft brush. Now if I want thicker mud, I apply more fixer and do it again. But I own those very pigments! Good stuff!
So, I'm doing things backwards? Hmm.
Brush the Fixer on first. Then I guess use a different "dry" brush to apply pigments.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
I think you will have better results. But remember what I wrote about the "freak out phase" when it dries.
I don't have a freak out phase. What I was doing was dusting it on and then wet brushing with Fixer and removing 90% off.
I was freaking out about wasting time and money and get nothing. These dry paint pigments may have a long shelf life but it still cost$ for this supplies. It seems that I only bought 3 bottles but someone gave me a good size sample of another shade.

You also stated: "Now if I want thicker mud, I apply more fixer and do it again".
That sure sounds like painting to me. :smile coffee:

I'm not working on anything now so this is not a high priority. I am stuck on my WW2 diorama because I can't picture how I want the groundwork to look in the end. @rebel brit has been trying to help me with this in our Instant Messages. I wish I could glean some of his talent.
 

Leigh Cole

Private
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
Monroe, MI
I don't have a freak out phase. What I was doing was dusting it on and then wet brushing with Fixer and removing 90% off.
I was freaking out about wasting time and money and get nothing. These dry paint pigments may have a long shelf life but it still cost$ for this supplies. It seems that I only bought 3 bottles but someone gave me a good size sample of another shade.

You also stated: "Now if I want thicker mud, I apply more fixer and do it again".
That sure sounds like painting to me. :smile coffee:

I'm not working on anything now so this is not a high priority. I am stuck on my WW2 diorama because I can't picture how I want the groundwork to look in the end. @rebel brit has been trying to help me with this in our Instant Messages. I wish I could glean some of his talent.
When I wrote freak out phase, that was intended for new guys to pigments. The deeper muck made with multiple pigments is really an armor technique. They do have pre-made mud and dirt for this as well.
 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
May 4, 2015
Location
Boonville, MO.
Yes. I was worried that I violated the Rule about non-CW figures but I was only trying to show a close-up of the results I obtain from using set of rust application paints. Of course, you don't have a lot of rusty steel in Civil War equipment as you would in steel tanks and cannons of WW2.

No- - I'm not new here. I just not posting a lot because I am not actively modeling and painting. I have posted some photos of the 1/6 Scale Williams Gun cannon that I scratch-built out of plastic. I used a kit that can be found at many battlefield shops for my wheels. I was looking to see if I posted any photos of my weathering techniques on CWTalk but I can't seem to find any.
This link shows a "page" from a forum where I show the wheel and the cannon with basecoat. I weathered both with dry media and some mixed shades.
Link: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/williams-10-ounce-artillery-gun.13171/page-5

I also posted photos of several figures that I own ---some that I painted---in the first 3 pages of the forum on Non-Civil War Figures.
Link: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/share-your-non-civil-war-miniatures-here.167925/

After applying the basecoat to my Carriage, I bought some Vallejo pigments. This photo(below) show results using this. Note I also have Pigment Fixer. That is what I can't seem to get to work.
I dust one a coat of grim and dust but when I apply the wet Fixer, it washes most of it away. Most people tell me either to keep repeating the steps over and over or just dust it on and don't move the model at all. I think the results you see in this photo was attained just by wetting the dry pigments and "painting" it on. Dont' worry---the final product doesn't look so splotchy as it does in this image.

I would like some instructions but it is hard to understand and I need to sit with someone for 5 minutes and watch it done.


View attachment 397283
DixieRifles---
We have a little confusion here. I was directing my post towards Mr. Leigh Cole and not you. Mr. Leigh Cole seems to be a new poster to our miniatures forum and I wanted to welcome him. He said he has some military vehicles models he wanted to post here so I reminded him to do it in the portion of the forum for non Civil War items.
I suspect the confusion is due to his name being Cole and your family connection to the Cole family; I wonder if there's a connection there? You and I have previously conversed regarding your possible connection to Hannah Cole, the founder of Boonville, Mo., and my gg grandfather's involvement in the battles of Collierville as a member of the 7th Ill. Vol. Cavalry. It's all good, as your response allowed me to see your excellent model of the Williams cannon again; (it's worth a second or third look), and Leigh Cole's response in how he uses pigments on his models, which is something I have no experience in.

So everything worked out from the confusion!
 

Leigh Cole

Private
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
Monroe, MI
DixieRifles---
We have a little confusion here. I was directing my post towards Mr. Leigh Cole and not you. Mr. Leigh Cole seems to be a new poster to our miniatures forum and I wanted to welcome him. He said he has some military vehicles models he wanted to post here so I reminded him to do it in the portion of the forum for non Civil War items.
I suspect the confusion is due to his name being Cole and your family connection to the Cole family; I wonder if there's a connection there? You and I have previously conversed regarding your possible connection to Hannah Cole, the founder of Boonville, Mo., and my gg grandfather's involvement in the battles of Collierville as a member of the 7th Ill. Vol. Cavalry. It's all good, as your response allowed me to see your excellent model of the Williams cannon again; (it's worth a second or third look), and Leigh Cole's response in how he uses pigments on his models, which is something I have no experience in.

So everything worked out from the confusion!
I apologize for creating chaos and confusion here. Yes, I just started posting as I have time now. I do not think there is a Southern Connection. Most of my family, both sides, are "Straight out of Canada." Rather recent, too. I am no more than third generation
American, with the exception of my Grandma, mom's side.
My maternal Grandmother did grow up in Southern Illinois and I had someone who served in a Union unit from there, but I know no more than that. My paternal Grandfather's family was recruited by William Penn from the Palatine German's and came to America in 1744, perhaps on the same boat as the Koster family, later known as the Custer family. They were also Palatine Germans and came here in the same year.
In 1776 they were living in Philadelphia and when the war started they enlisted in a Hessian command. They being the 4 brothers. Henry Hagle, Jr was a Hauptman. Another brother died in a Rebel POW camp. After the war, being United Empire Loyalists, they all up and moved to Canada. Later kin fought with a Canadian unit in 1812.
My Grandfather, Leigh Hagle, was first Generation American and served in the US Army from 1917-1929. He was commission late in his career as a Lieutenant in the Field Artillery. I still have his uniform and paperwork. Almost all these men became Ministers after serving. No coincidence that is my chosen path as well.
I hope this bit of history is taken as just a way of deeper introduction and does help to clear up any confusion. Leigh W Cole
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
I suspect the confusion is due to his name being Cole and your family connection to the Cole family; I wonder if there's a connection there? You and I have previously conversed regarding your possible connection to Hannah Cole, the founder of Boonville, Mo., and my gg grandfather's involvement in the battles of Collierville as a member of the 7th Ill. Vol. Cavalry.
True. I've got 3 conversations going on at once. When I do that, I tend to create a lot of confusion.
Yes, I haven't talked to Leigh about any family connections.
 

DixieRifles

Captain
Member of the Year
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Location
Collierville, TN
Another brother died in a Rebel POW camp. After the war, being United Empire Loyalists, they all up and moved to Canada. Later kin fought with a Canadian unit in 1812.
My Grandfather, Leigh Hagle, was first Generation American and served in the US Army from 1917-1929. He was commission late in his career as a Lieutenant in the Field Artillery. I still have his uniform and paperwork. Almost all these men became Ministers after serving. No coincidence that is my chosen path as well.
I would like to hear more. A Canadian who died in a Rebel POW Camp?
Was your Grandfather in the 85th Division in WW1?
 

Leigh Cole

Private
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
Monroe, MI
I would like to hear more. A Canadian who died in a Rebel POW Camp?
Was your Grandfather in the 85th Division in WW1?
I am sorry. I was referring to the Colonial's as the Rebels here. 1776 version of the Rebels. He was a Hessian trooper. According to the bio, the family was convinced the Colonials poisoned him. He was a Hessian, after all....
 

Hannover

Private
Joined
Jan 30, 2020
The specific paints I use are "Vallejo"
All of the figures you see on my Antietam Miller Cornfield posts have been painted with Vallejo paints. They come in 17ml bottles which I store upside down otherwise over time you may get some separation of pigment depending upon how often you use them. Always give them a good shake and then dispense the amount you think you will need onto a flat ceramic plate (much cheaper than any artist tray).
I learnt more by watching a professional painter tackle a few figures and was amazed at how much they thinned the paint down before using it. So the creamy texture is too thick and needs to be watered down with water on your brush. Then apply the paint, washing your brush very often as acrylic paint dries quickly and will clog up your brush if you allow it to dry too much. Always better to wash more often than not enough. Wash using clean water. If you have too much paint on your brush dry it off by dabbing it on some kitchen roll.
Generally I undercoat with black then for a uniform, paint the uniform with a darker colour than you want the end product to be. This can often be achieved by just adding a little bit of black to your colour. Then paint over with a bigger brush than you would imagine with the colour you want it to be as the idea is you do not allow the paint to get into the folds of the clothing - hence you get shading! Finally with an older scruffy brush you use a colour that is slightly lighter than the second coat. With this colour dry off your brush with kitchen roll until you think there is no paint on your brush. You then carefully brush is it over the uniform and it will highlight the very tops of any folds in the cloth.
This sounds like a lot of work but is very easy to do once you get it right and you will find you can get a production line of figures and easily paint 10 to 12 figures in a short time. You don't want to paint masses at once as you will only discourage yourself if you do not finish them - if the uniforms are more elaborate paint fewer figures. The idea is that you finish them in a reasonable amount of time.
You do not want to handle the figures when you paint them. With 28mm figures you need to stick them onto either bottle tops or I use flat wooden sticks (courtesy of Costa or Starbucks!) . Do this with a tiny dab of superglue (make sure it dries properly before you start to paint as a tiny bit of superglue will ruin your brush). When you have finished painting and varnishing the figure will neatly break off and then you can add it to a base (for 28mm I use laser cut mdf).
You will need to varnish the figure when you finish painting it. I prefer to gloss varnish as this is more resilient and then recoat with matt varnish to dull the figure. Some people just apply two coats of matt varnish. Whatever you do use an artist varnish (I use UV matt Windsor & Newton as this does not yellow in sunlight) as these are much finer (and more expensive) than anything found in a model shop. It is more expensive but well worth it considering the time you may spend on painting your figures and in a few years time you don't want white uniforms turning yellow due to sunlight!
If you are worried about painting faces you can use a shading wash of pale brown (I use Coat D'Arms but there are other makes that do more or less the same thing e.g. Army Painter) that you apply all over the face and the wash will collect in the facial markings and will give you a toned effect.
These 28mm figures I painted using exactly these techniques. Hope this helps.
50A..jpg
 
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