Howell County MO Family Removal to Rolla MO December 1862

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asdxrwhosu

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The following is from a description of Fort Wyman in Rolla, MO during the civil war in December 1862. Some of my ancestors were among those who escaped Howell County, MO. and died in Rolla. Does anyone have information and/or army records about these refugees and a description of their journey from Howell County to Rolla?

"Fort Wyman and the Union garrison at the railhead represented a safe haven for thousands of uprooted people who had fallen victim to a regional calamity that engulfed a large portion of Missouri.

Refugees from southern Missouri and northern Arkansas converged on Rolla during the war. They had been forced from their homes by order of Gen. James McBride due to unpopular opinions about the war or because of hostile neighbors. Many of these homeless families left farmsteads reduced to ruin after armies of either side had passed through. Many had been preyed upon by armed bands of guerrillas and bandits of every character.

With their men away in the armies, increasing numbers of destitute and starving women, children and aged civilians made their way to Rolla. Rations issued to them by army quartermasters at the railhead were a matter of life and death for hundreds of refugees who would have otherwise starved."
 

Zella

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The following is from a description of Fort Wyman in Rolla, MO during the civil war in December 1862. Some of my ancestors were among those who escaped Howell County, MO. and died in Rolla. Does anyone have information and/or army records about these refugees and a description of their journey from Howell County to Rolla?

"Fort Wyman and the Union garrison at the railhead represented a safe haven for thousands of uprooted people who had fallen victim to a regional calamity that engulfed a large portion of Missouri.

Refugees from southern Missouri and northern Arkansas converged on Rolla during the war. They had been forced from their homes by order of Gen. James McBride due to unpopular opinions about the war or because of hostile neighbors. Many of these homeless families left farmsteads reduced to ruin after armies of either side had passed through. Many had been preyed upon by armed bands of guerrillas and bandits of every character.

With their men away in the armies, increasing numbers of destitute and starving women, children and aged civilians made their way to Rolla. Rations issued to them by army quartermasters at the railhead were a matter of life and death for hundreds of refugees who would have otherwise starved."
I don't know the answer to your question but am responding to bump your post. Hoping someone in the know sees and can answer.

I live in NW Arkansas and hadn't realized about the migration to Rolla, but that makes sense. Certainly a lot of chaos in this area during the war. :frown:
 

archieclement

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Missouri State Historical Society would be best bet for journals ,letters, diaries
 
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