How was Pickett's Division rebuilt after Gettysburg

Luke Freet

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Most popular narratives of the Battle of Gettysburg (read, Gettysburg the Movie) say that Pickett's division was wiped out at Gettysburg. Of course, as many users know, this is not true, that it was rebuilt, served in the Carolinas and in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, then rejoined Lee for the later stages of the Overland Campaign and the Siege of Petersburg.
However, I am interested to know how the division was rebuilt. How many returned wounded and new recruits joined the division. How long did it take for the division's units to become "combat ready" again? Who commanded the brigades while certain commanders were still recovering from wounds and whatnot?
 

rpkennedy

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Carlisle, PA
Most popular narratives of the Battle of Gettysburg (read, Gettysburg the Movie) say that Pickett's division was wiped out at Gettysburg. Of course, as many users know, this is not true, that it was rebuilt, served in the Carolinas and in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, then rejoined Lee for the later stages of the Overland Campaign and the Siege of Petersburg.
However, I am interested to know how the division was rebuilt. How many returned wounded and new recruits joined the division. How long did it take for the division's units to become "combat ready" again? Who commanded the brigades while certain commanders were still recovering from wounds and whatnot?

It also helped that the two detached brigades of Brigadier General Montgomery D. Corse and Brigadier General Micah Jenkins were reunited with the division after the army returned to Virginia. I'll have to look and see if I can find anything about the division's organization post-Gettysburg.

Ryan
 

Luke Freet

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It also helped that the two detached brigades of Brigadier General Montgomery D. Corse and Brigadier General Micah Jenkins were reunited with the division after the army returned to Virginia. I'll have to look and see if I can find anything about the division's organization post-Gettysburg.

Ryan
Of course there is Corse. Jenkins was transferred to Hood's (later Field's) Division.
More refering to the 3 brigades that were present at Gettysburg.
 

Luke Freet

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I know that Hunton was promoted to command Garnett's old brigade, Colonel William R. Terry took command of Kemper's brigade temporarily, and Seth Barton was assigned to command Armistead's brigade. However, I know Hunton and Terry recieved wounds at Pickett's Charge, while Barton was just being paroled from Vicksburg. Who were the interim commanders? How long did it take for them to recover?
 

Luke Freet

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Well I don't know the numbers but I can tell you that my GG grandfather when he was drafted in September 1863 was put in one of the brigades of Pickett's division. I would assume most VA conscripts for the rest of 63 ended up there as the tried to rebuild it.
Considering that the other Virginia brigades in the AoNV had suffered fewer casualties compared to Pickett's men, I see how that would be the case
 

Bryce

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It also helped that the two detached brigades of Brigadier General Montgomery D. Corse and Brigadier General Micah Jenkins were reunited with the division after the army returned to Virginia. I'll have to look and see if I can find anything about the division's organization post-Gettysburg.

Ryan

Alfred Young has done a study of the strengths and casualties of Lee’s army from May 5, 1864 to April 9, 1865. I urge you to get in touch with him. We have been working on the losses and strengths of pickets division in 1865

Bryce
 

Tom Elmore

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One thing attempted was the recall of able-bodied detailed men from far-flung assignments in factories, hospitals, etc., but my sense is that the effort was less than successful because they were performing work deemed essential to the overall war effort. A few examples exist under the Confederate Letters section at Fold3.
 

Luke Freet

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Alfred Young has done a study of the strengths and casualties of Lee’s army from May 5, 1864 to April 9, 1865. I urge you to get in touch with him. We have been working on the losses and strengths of pickets division in 1865

Bryce
I've seen some of his tables from another thread regarding the AoNV during the Overland Campaign. Courtesy of @67th Tigers
Only have numbers from when they joined the AoNV around North Anna.
 

nc native

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Pickett's Division after Gettysburg was brought back to strength using a variety of methods. After the battle some of the officers who were left were furloughed to go to their respective homes and recruit men. Conscription helped fill the depleted ranks with men. The wounded who survived the battle and the journey back from Pennsylvania rejoined the division if they were able to.

The number of men in Pickett's Division may have approached its former totals after rest and reorganization but in many cases the quality of the men who were serving declined. For example the forty-three year half-brother of my direct ancestor Lt. James P. Glenn of the
18th Virginia who was wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Joseph Glenn, enlisted in the regiment in the fall of 1863. He may have been motivated by the fact that one of his half-brothers was killed during the battle and three more were wounded, two of those being captured, but he spent most of his service sick in the hospitals around Richmond and died shortly after the war. That being said during one of the final inspections of the Army of Northern Virginia in March 1865, Pickett's Division was the largest division in the army.
 
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John Wolf Smith

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Canada
I know that Hunton was promoted to command Garnett's old brigade, Colonel William R. Terry took command of Kemper's brigade temporarily, and Seth Barton was assigned to command Armistead's brigade. However, I know Hunton and Terry recieved wounds at Pickett's Charge, while Barton was just being paroled from Vicksburg. Who were the interim commanders? How long did it take for them to recover?
The interim commanders were Ltc William Watts (July), then Col Eppa Hunton for Garnett's brigade (From July to August when Hunton was promoted to General), Kemper's Brigade was commanded by Col Joseph Mayo (July to September) and then Col William R. Terry.
Armistead's brigade was commanded by Maj. Joseph R. Cabell (July 3rd) and Col William R. Aylett (from July 3rd to September). Colonels Edward C. Edmonds (Armistead's Brigade; 38th Virginia) and Col William D. Stuart (Garnett's Brigade; 56th Virginia), who were both killed at Gettysburg were both going to get generalships, Stuart for Garnett's Brigade (Stuart was killed on July 3rd) and Edmonds for Armistead after Gettysburg (He was believed to have been captured on July 3rd and was petitioned for generalship by the brigade; Edmonds was killed on July 3rd).
 

Hannover

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This is what I have of Pickett's Division for around early May 1864:

Pickett’s Division
Estimated brigade strengths prior to 10th May 1864 (Young)
Regt. Commanders (Sibley)​

Terry’s Brigade [1,450]
Brig. Gen. William R. Terry
staff: 5
1st Virginia: Lt-Col. Francis H. Langley [160]
Maj. George F. Norton (from about 5-10 May)
3rd Virginia: unknown [265]
7th Virginia: Col. Charles C. Flowerree [310]
11th Virginia: Capt. Robert M. Mitchell Jr.[370]
24th Virginia: unknown [340]

Hunton’s Brigade [1,700]
Brig. Gen. Eppa Hunton
staff: 5
8th Virginia: Col. Norborne Berkeley [245]
18th Virginia: Maj. George C. Cabell [320]
19th Virginia: Col. Henry Gantt [355]
28th Virginia: Col. William Watts [450]
56th Virginia: Capt. John Richardson [325]

Barton’s Brigade [1,835]
Brig. Gen. Birkett D. Fry
staff: 5
9th Virginia: Col. James J. Phillips [245]
14th Virginia: Col. William White [385]
38th Virginia: Col. George K. Griggs [405]
53rd Virginia: Col. William Aylet [380]
57th Virginia: Col. Clement R. Fontaine [415]
Regimental commanders from 11 May (O.R. XXXVI, pt2, 219).

Corse’s Brigade [1,755]
Brig. Gen. Montgomery Corse
staff: 5
15th Virginia: Lt-Col. Emmett M. Morrison [280]
17th Virginia: Lt-Col. Arthur Herbert [275]
29th Virginia: Col. James Giles [545]
30th Virginia: Col. Archibald T. Harrison [410]
32nd Virginia: Col. Edgar B. Montague [240]
was in Hunton’s Brigade until 23 May when it was transferred to Corse’s Brigade.
Regimental commanders on or about 5-10 May.
 

Luke Freet

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This is what I have of Pickett's Division for around early May 1864:

Pickett’s Division
Estimated brigade strengths prior to 10th May 1864 (Young)
Regt. Commanders (Sibley)​

Terry’s Brigade [1,450]
Brig. Gen. William R. Terry
staff: 5
1st Virginia: Lt-Col. Francis H. Langley [160]
Maj. George F. Norton (from about 5-10 May)
3rd Virginia: unknown [265]
7th Virginia: Col. Charles C. Flowerree [310]
11th Virginia: Capt. Robert M. Mitchell Jr.[370]
24th Virginia: unknown [340]

Hunton’s Brigade [1,700]
Brig. Gen. Eppa Hunton
staff: 5
8th Virginia: Col. Norborne Berkeley [245]
18th Virginia: Maj. George C. Cabell [320]
19th Virginia: Col. Henry Gantt [355]
28th Virginia: Col. William Watts [450]
56th Virginia: Capt. John Richardson [325]

Barton’s Brigade [1,835]
Brig. Gen. Birkett D. Fry
staff: 5
9th Virginia: Col. James J. Phillips [245]
14th Virginia: Col. William White [385]
38th Virginia: Col. George K. Griggs [405]
53rd Virginia: Col. William Aylet [380]
57th Virginia: Col. Clement R. Fontaine [415]
Regimental commanders from 11 May (O.R. XXXVI, pt2, 219).

Corse’s Brigade [1,755]
Brig. Gen. Montgomery Corse
staff: 5
15th Virginia: Lt-Col. Emmett M. Morrison [280]
17th Virginia: Lt-Col. Arthur Herbert [275]
29th Virginia: Col. James Giles [545]
30th Virginia: Col. Archibald T. Harrison [410]
32nd Virginia: Col. Edgar B. Montague [240]
was in Hunton’s Brigade until 23 May when it was transferred to Corse’s Brigade.
Regimental commanders on or about 5-10 May.
Fantastic. Thanks for sharing.
 

Joshism

2nd Lieutenant
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Apr 30, 2012
Location
Jupiter, FL
That being said during one of the final inspections of the Army of Northern Virginia in March 1865, Pickett's Division was the largest division in the army.

And by the time they got to Appomattox it had been destroyed arguably worse than at Gettysburg. Lee's Last Retreat describes the division as essentially shattered at Five Forks. Pickett was hemorrhaging deserters on the way to Appomattox and got caught up in the disaster at Sailor's Creek. Pickett was relieved of command in the last days because he effectively had nothing left to command.
 

Luke Freet

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And by the time they got to Appomattox it had been destroyed arguably worse than at Gettysburg. Lee's Last Retreat describes the division as essentially shattered at Five Forks. Pickett was hemorrhaging deserters on the way to Appomattox and got caught up in the disaster at Sailor's Creek. Pickett was relieved of command in the last days because he effectively had nothing left to command.
I believe there was only a thousand men left in the division. One hell of a beating.
 

John Wolf Smith

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Nov 6, 2019
Location
Canada
I believe there was only a thousand men left in the division. One hell of a beating.
The division had 1,120 (this has been rounded) men left.

Pickett's Division: MG George E. Pickett
Steuart's Brigade: BG George H. Steuart (380)
Corse's Brigade: Col Arthur Herbert (370)
Hunton's Brigade: Maj. Michael P. Sessard (200)
Terry's Brigade: Maj. Maj. William W. Bentley (170)
 
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