How realistic are Confederate red-trimmed artillery uniforms?


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Legion Para

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http://www.oldsouthantiques.com/os5040p1.htm

Five days after Virginia passed the Ordinance of Secession, William Rice, a twenty-seven year old merchant in New Market Town, Shenandoah, Virginia, called a town meeting, raised his own battery and organized what became on April 22nd the 'Eighth Star Artillery'. The name was derived from Virginia, having become the eighth state to secede and the eighth star in the Confederate 1st National Flag.

Captain William Rice's uniform.

os5040p1.jpg
 
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Right, even Troiani can make mistakes and I have spotted them in his work, but I thought I'd post those here as that's all I had on hand at the moment. I was actually wondering if anyone could point out anything in particular on the Lumsden Battery print, especially the jacket on the No. 3 man with his thumb on the vent. Is there a surviving example of this jacket?

My first thought was a North Carolina, or Atlanta Depot jacket due to the 6 button front. The most obvious difference between the two styles is the plumb edge collar on the Atlanta Depot jackets. The North Carolina jacket would be improbable, but not impossible, considering that Lumsden's battery was an Alabama unit. After closer examination however, the coat depicted has a red collar which is not a feature associated with either style coat. I would wager that Mr. Troiani depicted the #3 man in a simple private purchase jacket.

Cheers,
Garrett
 

Legion Para

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Dave Wilma

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Soldiers like to be distinctive. If there was any opportunity to add red to a uniform to designate artillery, I think the soldier would try it. Naturally, staying warm and dry took priority, but given the chance you will see the gunners with red. In the confusion of battle there is some security in being near men you can recognize.
 

tryagain

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For various pictures of CSA Artillery Dress
See Francis MIller's "Photograhic History of the Civil War" Vol 5 . "Forts and Artillery"
p. 65 picture of Rutledges Tenn Battery members
p.70 picture of Captain John Donnel Smith
p.73 for pictures of Frank Huger and William T. Pogue;

Also go the April 1865 Roche Pictures of CSA dead in Petersburg trenches-at least one I think is wearing red trimmed Gray Uniform
 

AUG

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It looks almost like some sort of late-war Richmond Depot style jacket or maybe a Peter Tait import?
My first thought was a North Carolina, or Atlanta Depot jacket due to the 6 button front. The most obvious difference between the two styles is the plumb edge collar on the Atlanta Depot jackets. The North Carolina jacket would be improbable, but not impossible, considering that Lumsden's battery was an Alabama unit. After closer examination however, the coat depicted has a red collar which is not a feature associated with either style coat. I would wager that Mr. Troiani depicted the #3 man in a simple private purchase jacket.

Cheers,
Garrett
I happened to run across this image of Pvt. James Thomas Searcy in Lumsden's Battery here. The jacket he's wearing just may well be the one Troiani based the one in his painting on.
 
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SquirrelHudson

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I happened to run across this image of Pvt. James Thomas Searcy in Lumsden's Battery here. The jacket he's wearing just may well be the one Troiani based the one in his painting on.
That's so odd because you saw that picture I had of Pvt. Wilborn of Lumsden's Battery wearing an infantry style blue-trimmed Columbus Depot jacket. Perhaps some got different jackets depending on the time?
 
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That's so odd because you saw that picture I had of Pvt. Wilborn of Lumsden's Battery wearing an infantry style blue-trimmed Columbus Depot jacket. Perhaps some got different jackets depending on the time?
He undoubtedly received different uniforms during his service. However, the jacket that Pvt. Searcy is wearing in the photo is not a "Columbus" Depot jacket. It has a clearly visible seam in the sleeves, indicating a 2 piece sleeve, and also lacks cuff trim, although there is some shadowing near the cuffs that will make you look twice. It also appears to me that there could be piping down the front of the jacket on the button hole side, but I did not enlarge the photo enough to confirm.

Cheers,
Garrett
 
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I happened to run across this image of Pvt. James Thomas Searcy in Lumsden's Battery here. The jacket he's wearing just may well be the one Troiani based the one in his painting on.
AUG351
and tdstephen
Thanks for posting !!
Awesome !!!!
James T. Searcy was my Great Grandfather
I had not seen this photo
Reference says it is in a collection at Univ of Alabama
Much obliged,
BGB
 
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SquirrelHudson

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He undoubtedly received different uniforms during his service. However, the jacket that Pvt. Searcy is wearing in the photo is not a "Columbus" Depot jacket. It has a clearly visible seam in the sleeves, indicating a 2 piece sleeve, and also lacks cuff trim, although there is some shadowing near the cuffs that will make you look twice. It also appears to me that there could be piping down the front of the jacket on the button hole side, but I did not enlarge the photo enough to confirm.

Cheers,
Garrett
Perhaps what they went off to war with and what they were issued later on are two different things?
 

tdstepen

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That is where I saw the picture the other day in a google book! That roster of the men in Ward's Artillery was published in the I believe in 1905 in the Limestone County,Alabama Democrat Newspaper. BGB, I am glad your got to see the picture of your Great Grandfather James T. Searcy! I will read the material you sent.
 


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