Discussion How many swords would Lee or Grant have?

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James N.

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These presentation swords had to be jolly expensive back then, especially since it seems like a lot were being ordered from Tiffany's. Do you have any idea how much they were costing a group of officers or townspeople back then @ucvrelics ?
Thank you James N. - I get it now - Big Bling for officers and the bigger you are - the bigger the Bling! Not much changes, just the items!
One of the oddest and most impressive though totally impractical Presentation swords I can think of is this one belonging to Missouri Confederate General Sterling Price in the collections of the (former) Museum of the Confederacy, now at Appomattox and copied from their website (emphasis added):

Thomas, Griswold and Company, New Orleans, Louisiana, CSA

Confederate Presentation Sword: straight, double-edged blade etched with floral sprays and the motto "Ense et Virtute per aspera ad alta"; gilded brass hilt formed of intertwined representations of hemp stalk, tobacco, grapes and cotton, shield device engraved with the Missouri coat of arms; pommel cast to represent the Louisiana coat of arms of a pelican feeding her young; ivory grip carved to represent an ear of corn. With scabbard (.1b) and presentation case (.1c).

This presentation sword was given to Maj. Gen. Sterling Price by the women of New Orleans in 1862 shortly after the Battle of Lexington, Missouri. It features symbols of Missouri and Louisiana. At the time of its manufacture, it was reputed to be finest Confederate sword in existence and cost approximately $1,000. The sum was raised by public subscription not exceeding $1 each.

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Cavalry Charger

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One of the oddest and most impressive though totally impractical Presentation swords I can think of is this one belonging to Missouri Confederate General Sterling Price in the collections of the (former) Museum of the Confederacy, now at Appomattox and copied from their website (emphasis added):

Thomas, Griswold and Company, New Orleans, Louisiana, CSA

Confederate Presentation Sword: straight, double-edged blade etched with floral sprays and the motto "Ense et Virtute per aspera ad alta"; gilded brass hilt formed of intertwined representations of hemp stalk, tobacco, grapes and cotton, shield device engraved with the Missouri coat of arms; pommel cast to represent the Louisiana coat of arms of a pelican feeding her young; ivory grip carved to represent an ear of corn. With scabbard (.1b) and presentation case (.1c).

This presentation sword was given to Maj. Gen. Sterling Price by the women of New Orleans in 1862 shortly after the Battle of Lexington, Missouri. It features symbols of Missouri and Louisiana. At the time of its manufacture, it was reputed to be finest Confederate sword in existence and cost approximately $1,000. The sum was raised by public subscription not exceeding $1 each.

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I can't get over the pelican feeding her young on this one! That truly is a beautiful and remarkable sword.

Thanks for sharing James N.
 

Saphroneth

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A well-liked general with a reputation for success could pick up a lot of honours. The Duke of Wellington is a particularly silly example because he ended up with ten Field Marshal batons (two of them British and a third English), though the Russian one has since been stolen.
 
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Cavalier

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@NH Civil War Gal This has been facinating! It is my impression that in the French army of Napoleon there was a required number of swords an officer officer had to take into the field on campaign with him based on his rank. I never seen anything like that as far as American civil war officers are concerned. Thanks for posting this!
 
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