How Many Southern States Paid Pensions To Faithful Servants?

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ucvrelics

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Here is a great article about Southern States provided pensions to the faithful servants that were with CS Troops during the CW. When is was written and published in the CS Vets magazine, Mississippi and Tennessee were the only 2. How many other States followed suit

pensions for slaves.jpg
 
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http://www.mshistorynow.mdah.ms.gov/articles/289/black-confederate-pensioners-after-the-civil-war
Black Confederate Pensioners After the Civil War by James G. Hollandsworth Jr.
Black Confederate pensioners
Veterans of the Union army who were disabled as a result of their service during the Civil War were eligible for a federal pension as early 1868. However, disabled Confederate veterans had to wait until their Confederate allies regained political control of the Southern states after Reconstruction to apply for pensions sponsored by the individual states. Although Confederate pensions were limited initially to disabled veterans, it was not long before eligibility was expanded to include veterans who were poor and in need. North Carolina and Florida led the way in 1885, and by 1898 all of the states that had seceded from the Union offered pensions to indigent Confederate veterans. Missouri and Kentucky followed suit in 1911 and 1912, respectively. These states, with the exception of Missouri, also extended coverage to indigent widows of veterans, as long as they did not remarry.

African Americans who had served with the Confederate army were not included – except in Mississippi, which had included African Americans in the state’s pension program from its beginning in 1888. It was not until 1921 that another state extended the eligibility for pensions to African Americans who had served as servants with the Confederate army. Unfortunately, black southerners who applied for Confederate pensions in the 1920s were, for the most part, very old men. Consequently, the number of black pensioners was small compared to the large number of Confederate veterans in the states that had allowed for pensions decades earlier. For example, Mississippi, which was the only state to include African Americans from its program’s beginning in 1888, had 1,739 black pensioners; North Carolina, which first offered pensions in 1927 had 121; South Carolina, which first offered pensions in 1923, had 328; Tennessee, which first offered pensions in 1921, had 195; and Virginia, which first offered pensions in 1924, had 424 black pensioners.

Initially, Mississippi’s pensions for Confederate veterans were limited to soldiers or sailors and their former servants with a disability sustained during the war, such as the loss of a limb, that prevented them from engaging in manual labor, and to women who had been widowed during the war and had not remarried. In 1892, Mississippi expanded the eligibility for pensions to include veterans, their former servants, and unmarried widows “who are now resident in this State, and who are indigent and not able to earn support by their own labor.”
 

Drew

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Here is a great article about Southern States provided pensions to the faithful servants that were with CS Troops during the CW. When is was written and published in the CS Vets magazine, Mississippi and Tennessee were the only 2. How many other Staes followed suit
(sic) About all of them. There isn't a former Confederate state that didn't pay pensions to African Americans who served.

At least that I'm aware of.

Keep in mind, the U.S. Government paid pensions to veterans of the Union Army. It was a very controversial drain on the Treasury. The former Confederate States did this on there own, without help from Washington DC.
 

jgoodguy

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(sic) About all of them. There isn't a former Confederate state that didn't pay pensions to African Americans who served.

At least that I'm aware of.

Keep in mind, the U.S. Government paid pensions to veterans of the Union Army. It was a very controversial drain on the Treasury. The former Confederate States did this on there own, without help from Washington DC.
The States that seceded unilaterally, unilaterally paid CSA soldier pensions.
 
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I don't believe Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Louisiana paid servants pensions. There were men from these States that filed while living in other States that did. Arkansas had a number of Confederate homes. If servant pensioners had to enter one of the homes, he relinquished his pension back to the State. Border states, Kentucky, and Missouri paid Confederate pensions, but not to servants.
 

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I read that Missouri paid it's Confederate soldiers a pension. They established an old soldiers home for them at Higginsville, just east of Kansas City.
The Confederate soldiers' home in Higginsville was for veterans from any state or branch of the service. It is truly amazing to walk the cemetery there and see the states and the military units that are represented.
 
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Lusty Murfax

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The Confederate soldiers' home in Higginsville was for veterans from any state or branch of the service. It is truly amazing to walk the cemetery there and see the states and the military units that are represented.
One of my Mother's Great Uncles resided there his last few years and is buried in the cemetery. He was a veteran of a Virginia infantry regiment. By that point much of his immediate family had migrated to northwest Missouri.
 

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I don't believe Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Louisiana paid servants pensions. There were men from these States that filed while living in other States that did. Arkansas had a number of Confederate homes. If servant pensioners had to enter one of the homes, he relinquished his pension back to the State. Border states, Kentucky, and Missouri paid Confederate pensions, but not to servants.
Did the US government pay pensions to Yankee servants, & laborers, or just officially listed soldiers..?
 
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Did the US government pay pensions to Yankee servants, & laborers, or just officially listed soldiers..?
They should have footed the bill for them, since they were in Federal service. In the case of Missouri, Federal military authorities mustered troops for Federal service without State consent. Those military authorities then used these troops to capture the State militia training facility, threaten and intimidate State officials, mount an invasion of the State, occupy it's capital and in conjunction with out of State troops make war on the people of Missouri. Upon occupation of key points, the Federal military authority vacated State government offices, including duly elected officials and replaced them with their own appointees. Given that the State of Missouri had no hand in these actions, it should have had no liability to pay pensions to veterans of Federal/Union service.
 

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That's interesting, because South Carolina had provided pensions to some black men prior to 1906. I think it was on a case by case basis though, as with the white veterans. There was no special category for "faithful servants".

The Manning times. (Manning, Clarendon County, S.C.) 1884-current, July 17, 1889
29fn05.jpg
It would be interesting to see the paperwork for the individuals.
 

jgoodguy

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They should have footed the bill for them, since they were in Federal service. In the case of Missouri, Federal military authorities mustered troops for Federal service without State consent. Those military authorities then used these troops to capture the State militia training facility, threaten and intimidate State officials, mount an invasion of the State, occupy it's capital and in conjunction with out of State troops make war on the people of Missouri. Upon occupation of key points, the Federal military authority vacated State government offices, including duly elected officials and replaced them with their own appointees. Given that the State of Missouri had no hand in these actions, it should have had no liability to pay pensions to veterans of Federal/Union service.
Nice rhetoric, but it was not the State of Missouri, just disloyal rebels that were inconvenienced. Oathbreakers, disloyal citizens, violators of federal law, rebel conspirators and criminals do not make a State.
 
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Patrick H

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Nice rhetoric, but it was not the State of Missouri, just disloyal rebels that were inconvenienced. Oathbreakers, disloyal citizens, violators of federal law, rebel conspirators and criminals do not make a State.
In my home town of Boonville, EVERYONE was inconvenienced by the events described in post #13. You should not conclude from this statement that the whole town was disloyal. It was divided, but I believe a majority was loyal and another significant percentage just wanted to be left alone. Eventually, a number of those were pushed to the disloyal side of the fence by the behavior of the troops that occupied the town.

But this is about pensions. I have no idea whether laborers working for the Home Guard and the out of state troops were pensioned after the war. It is known that Col. Eppstein sheltered and armed runaway slaves in his fort here in 1861, and letters from eyewitnesses of the era say that Eppstein uniformed these men, too. Of course, that doesn't officially make them enlisted soldiers, but it was probably as close as a black man came to achieving that position in 1861. Those guys deserved pensions, whether or not they received them.
 
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Patrick H

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In post #17, I should have reminded readers that Missouri was a border state with a secessionist governor. I don't believe the majority of the legislature would have been for secession, but the rural areas of the state were still very southern in culture. Col. Eppstein was a German immigrant. His home guard was a militia of citizens which I believe later got assimilated into a larger state militia that was federally funded. My point in this is that it becomes difficult to know who would be responsible for pensioning the early laborers.
 

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rhetoric...? Sounded more like history to me....
I thought I was stating the case conservatively. Didn't even get into the confiscation of private property, including systematic robbing local banks of both private deposits and bank capital funds, as well as the requisitioning the inventories of farms and small businesses. Then there is the matter of wholesale arrest and imprisonment of anyone suspected of disloyalty to the Union. IMO, 'they bought it, they should pay for it' should have been the guide in pensioning their soldiers.
 
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