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How Does Your Garden Grow?

Discussion in 'Foods of the Civil War' started by donna, Apr 28, 2016.

  1. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Just thought I would start thread on forum member's gardens. It be nice to hear who has started one and what you will be growing and then later update on how the garden is doing.

    As of yet I have no garden. Usually start in May. My husband has rule we start Mother's Day. So since Mother's Day is May 8th, not far to go.
     

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  3. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    It refuses to let me correct title. Should Be How Does Your Garden Grow?

    I don't know why it won't let me edit.
     
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  4. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    It now let me fix title. Been having trouble with site today. It been very slow and as said in staff forum, the search bar is gone.
     
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  5. John Winn

    John Winn Captain

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    Good idea donna.

    So far all we've got is lettuce and spinach; cool weather crops. They're still doing fine and we eat some every day. Once it starts warming up, though, it goes to seed and we pull it up and replace it with some herbs and basil.

    Mother's day is a pretty good guide around here, too, and this week-end is the Master Gardener's show at the fairgrounds where all the nurseries bring starts and gardening stuff. We usually buy from the Grange and one other place we like though; don't have to negotiate the crowd. This being a warmer-than-usual spring I'll probably plant everything except the cucumbers (they like it hot) next week. We mostly do several types of tomatoes (cherries, slicers, and sauce) and maybe five kinds of peppers in addition to the cucumbers.

    We have raised beds with drip irrigation and use compost I make for fertilization. My wife has a friend who raises goats so I get manure every fall and mix it with the leaves and it makes really good stuff loaded with worms. I keep one bin active all year using household waste and that one gets tilled into the raised beds every fall. The soil in those raised beds is like potting soil out of a bag; easy to dig, black, full of worms, and loaded with organic matter and nitrogen. We always have tomatoes before anybody else.

    OK, you punched one of my buttons and I've been babbling. I love to hear about other people's gardening (ornamental and vegetables).
     
  6. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    My daffodils are starting to bloom, tulips are up but just barely. Garlic is 6" high, hope to plant onions this weekend.
    Hellebores are blooming, and primroses are just starting. Too early to plant to much, but tomato seedlings are coming along. I have to get some other things started too. It is still cold here, 5 degrees Celsius today. We cannot count on planting tender things out until after the last full moon in late May or early June. Victoria Day Weekend, the closest Monday before May 24th, is the usual time for planting, opening up the cottage, and pretending it is summer, but it depends on the year. That is usually the week before your Memorial Day weekend.
     
  7. CSA Today

    CSA Today Colonel

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    Every thing planted except okra. Plant that next week.
     
  8. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    The only okra I have ever tasted was some gross slimy stuff that came in a can of soup. Occasionally I see it in the market here, but it generally looks pretty bad by the time it arrives there from whence it comes. We can now get it frozen, but I don't know if it would be any good. We have too short a season to grow it here in the Frozen North. When does it come into season? Maybe I can taste some when I come to Gettysburg in September.
     
  9. CSA Today

    CSA Today Colonel

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    We plant it here about May 1, it should be ready by early July.
     
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  10. ami

    ami Major General Super Moderator

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    Havent started yet, we are still getting frost. My strawberries came back well though, and it looks like I will have grapes this year too!
     
  11. truthckr

    truthckr Sergeant Major

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    Not safe to plant "Summer" crops until at least Mother's Day here in the Shenandoah Valley. First working of the ground is completed and will see tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, green beans, and corn planted soon. I used to plant potatoes and spring onions in mid-April, but quit a few years ago.
     
  12. truthckr

    truthckr Sergeant Major

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    You need/have to try okra deep fried. In my opinion that's the only way to eat okra.
     
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  13. 16thVA

    16thVA First Sergeant

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    The only place I find okra around here is in the Asian supermarket. One grocery store stocks frozen chopped okra as well as hominy. I was buying a can of hominy in a store here in Philly some years ago and the cashier picked it up and said "You're not from around here, are you?" I'm white and she was black, she was originally from Virginia.

    I only have a container garden in a small concrete patch behind my house and I only try to grow flowers, since I have a demon squirrel who destroys most of my plants. I have a small ornamental tree and last year, just as it was sprouting its spring leaves the squirrel stripped every one off the tree, to make a nest I suppose. A friend gave me a Hav-a-Heart trap and I asked him how do I attach the grinder? I am out there every day now trying to keep the aphids from destroying the roses. I have a great mixture of rubbing alcohol, Murphy's oil soap and some water in a sprayer and this kills pests like aphids and it's very safe.
     
  14. LoriAnn

    LoriAnn 1st Lieutenant

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    We're hoping to have green beans, tomatoes, and corn again this year. We're also trying to plant more bee-friendly flowers. Last year, we had a wonderful population of bumble and honey bees, and we want to keep that going. Those little dudes are so cute.
     
  15. Anna Elizabeth Henry

    Anna Elizabeth Henry Sergeant Major Silver Patron

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    My garden isn't vegetable friendly as my area has a feral cat situation we're having difficulty with for the past few years. However, I do have lovely lilacs blooming, along with a weak showing from azaleas (not sure why they aren't doing well this year!). I planted some hardy marigolds last week and de-weeded the garden, too.

    Anyone have any tips on ridding your flower beds of weeds? My neighbor doesn't maintain his yard so it's literally a field of dandelions or when they seed I call it the field of wishes! :tongue:
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2016
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  16. MRB1863

    MRB1863 Captain Forum Host

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    Ya' know, sometimes the term "weeds" is in the eye of the beholder. Dandelion on a salad plate are hardly considered weeds, but an orchid in a vegetable patch can be considered a weed to be pulled and discarded. I suppose weeds are kinda like people, some fit in somewhere and but not another place...
     
  17. Anna Elizabeth Henry

    Anna Elizabeth Henry Sergeant Major Silver Patron

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    I agree, after all you can even make wine with dandelions! And I always did like them as a little girl, but when they mar up your flower beds and grow up in between your rose bushes they are a problem, sadly.
     
  18. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    Here's a cute little site that offers some suggestions. I generally use boiling vinegar or boiling water.
    http://www.plantea.com/dandelions.htm

    Edit: If you boil the vinegar in your kettle, it also cleans the scale out of the kettle at the same time. Bonus!
     
  19. Anna Elizabeth Henry

    Anna Elizabeth Henry Sergeant Major Silver Patron

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    Thanks so much! :thumbsup: I can kill two birds with one stone it seems! I was looking for something more natural as I had a weed killer disaster a few years back wherein I sprayed it and a huge gust of wind came through the yard (it had been a calm day up till that point) and blew all over my mini-rosebush. My weeds didn't die, but half of my rosebush did :frown:
     
  20. Northern Light

    Northern Light Captain

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    I have always tried to garden organically, but have resorted to chemicals occasionally. I had a really bad infestation of red lily beetles that decimated my lovely collection of lilies. I asked at the nurseries what to use and they said Neem oil would kill the slimy larvae, but to really get rid of them, I needed to apply Sevin around the roots in the fall to kill the overwintering beetles. The Neem oil worked wonders with the larvae, and I bought the Sevin, but never used it as I didn't want to kill all the beneficials as well. Now I just pick, pick, pick the beetles everyday and there are fewer each year.
     
  21. DaveBrt

    DaveBrt First Sergeant

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    Our Farmer's Market opened last Monday. We loaded upon tomatoes, squash, asparagus, strawberries and Amish-made ice cream. Everything is locally grown, though I no longer have a garden myself.

    Looked like we would have a great peach crop, but the rain spigot got turned off -- less than one inch in the last six weeks, total.
     

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