How Dixie Went from Being a Pop Song to an Anthem

Polloco

First Sergeant
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#21
How did the British Royals and Megan Merkel even enter this conversation? Sounds like someone is "Obsessed", or is it Enamored?, to even bring up the subject.
 

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Belle Montgomery

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#22
How did the British Royals and Megan Merkel even enter this conversation? Sounds like someone is "Obsessed", or is it Enamored?, to even bring up the subject.
NOT at all...I hate that ridiculous frivolous ****! It was the comparison to "cherry picking" certain cultures over others guilty of the same actions. Obviously you didn't get the odd juxtaposition I made.
 

Belle Montgomery

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#23
NOT at all...I hate that ridiculous frivolous ****! It was the comparison to "cherry picking" certain cultures over others guilty of the same actions. Obviously you didn't get the odd juxtaposition I made.
The British are the ones who made the ships and money bringing slaves to America to boot but no one ever likes to bring that up, that's all. To be clear, most of my husband's ancestors are from England so I'm not "bashing" just making a point about the hypocrisy.
 
Joined
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#24
Dixie had long since become a part of Americana, an old standard that most everyone enjoyed and which had a special meaning for those of us from the South. That it's no longer seen as such is a sign that we're coming apart as a culture, in my view.

We enjoy listening to it often in my house, particularly the 2nd SC String Band's version. Good to see that video of them performing it live earlier in the thread. I was able to hear them play it at Gettysburg this year. It's a rousing song when they play it and the crowd really gets into it.
 

Belle Montgomery

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#25
Dixie had long since become a part of Americana, an old standard that most everyone enjoyed and which had a special meaning for those of us from the South. That it's no longer seen as such is a sign that we're coming apart as a culture, in my view.
This famous George Gershwin song may be next on the chopping block because it's "plantation" sounding undertones :
Summertime, and the livin' is easy
Fish are jumpin' and the cotton is high
Oh, your daddy's rich and your ma is good-lookin'
So hush, little baby, don't you cry
 

BlueandGrayl

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#27
There was also a war variant of the iconic "Dixie" it was called "To Arms in Dixie" written by Albert Pike (ironically a Massachusetts-born Northerner) it replaced the rather lighthearted "King Cotton" lyrics of the original with a Confederate Army tune.

I've listened to both versions of the song the original and the To Arms variant.
 
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#29
There was also a war variant of the iconic "Dixie" it was called "To Arms in Dixie" written by Albert Pike (ironically a Massachusetts-born Northerner) it replaced the rather lighthearted "King Cotton" lyrics of the original with a Confederate Army tune.

I've listened to both versions of the song the original and the To Arms variant.
Bobby Horton sings a great rendition of the "To Arms" version of Dixie.

 
Joined
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#31
There was also a war variant of the iconic "Dixie" it was called "To Arms in Dixie" written by Albert Pike (ironically a Massachusetts-born Northerner) it replaced the rather lighthearted "King Cotton" lyrics of the original with a Confederate Army tune.

I've listened to both versions of the song the original and the To Arms variant.
There was also a Union variant of the song that was something of a 19th Century diss track.

 

Booner

2nd Lieutenant
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#35
Perhaps a year ago I read an article about the 1910 football game between the country's second oldest college rivals, the University of Missouri, (MU), and Kansas University, (KU). And yes, "Bleeding Kansas" was probably the start of the rivalry.
The game was held in Kansas City, and to maintain order between the the fans, had a heavy police presence.
When KU ran into the field, their band played "Bulla Bulla." The Kansas crowd screamed and cheered.
Then MU took the field and their band played "Dixie" to a overwhelming applause that shoot the very foundations of the stadium.

MU beat KU 12-6.

go MIZZOU!
 

Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
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Messages
10,115
#36
Perhaps a year ago I read an article about the 1910 football game between the country's second oldest college rivals, the University of Missouri, (MU), and Kansas University, (KU). And yes, "Bleeding Kansas" was probably the start of the rivalry.
The game was held in Kansas City, and to maintain order between the the fans, had a heavy police presence.
When KU ran into the field, their band played "Bulla Bulla." The Kansas crowd screamed and cheered.
Then MU took the field and their band played "Dixie" to a overwhelming applause that shoot the very foundations of the stadium.

MU beat KU 12-6.

go MIZZOU!
Yes, indeed, @Booner. In those days both teams and their fans rode the trains to K.C. on Thanksgiving Day to the biggest of the big games. There was almost nothing like the MU / KU football rivalry. At about the same time you referenced, the Kemper Military School Corps of Cadets marched to Dixie. Their superintendent had been a teenaged recruit during Price's 1864 invasion of Missouri.
 


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