Discussion How did the incredible distance from the Soldiers’ homes shape The Texas Brigade ?

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Rio Bravo

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 6, 2013
Messages
1,430
Location
Suffolk, U.K.
That distance especially for the Volunteers, who served in the three Texas Regiments and the 3rd Arkansas, ensured that only highly motivated Men served in this Brigade.
Hood’s Texans and their families believed that they could best shape a Confederate Victory in Virginia.
 

BigTex

Corporal
Joined
May 19, 2019
Messages
259
That distance especially for the Volunteers, who served in the three Texas Regiments and the 3rd Arkansas, ensured that only highly motivated Men served in this Brigade.
Hood’s Texans and their families believed that they could best shape a Confederate Victory in Virginia.
Initially, it was the 18th Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment that was part of the Texas Brigade. My g.g.grandfather was in Co. K of the 18th during that period prior to Gettysburg.
 

speedylee

Private
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
136
That distance especially for the Volunteers, who served in the three Texas Regiments and the 3rd Arkansas, ensured that only highly motivated Men served in this Brigade.
Hood’s Texans and their families believed that they could best shape a Confederate Victory in Virginia.
Read Susanna J. Ural's book on the subject, Hood's Texas Brigade: The Soldiers and Families of the Confederacy's Most Celebrated Unit. Ural answers your question, a tremendous book.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
6,998
Location
Texas
The three Texas regiments were recruited with the intention of serving in the East, so it's true that it consisted of some of Texas's first and most determined recruits, who wanted to fight where it was believed the major, decisive battles would be fought. They were mostly younger men who had been born out of state (though most people living in Texas were at the time), coming from middle class families. In comparison to many of the Texans who enlisted later and in units that would serve in Texas or in the Trans-Mississippi, they tended to be more loyal the South and the Confederacy, and more enthusiastic about secession. While they did consider Texas home, some who had been born east of the Mississippi also wished to fight for their former hometowns and states of birth as well.

I definitely second Ural's book mentioned above. It covers the social and demographic aspects of the brigade it great detail.
 

Polloco

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Messages
1,681
Location
South Texas
I haven't read the book but I like that part of the title that says ..."The Confederacy's Most Celebrated Unit" . Maybe I'm a little prejudice? I can see how being that far from home would have an impact initially but not for four years. Then unit pride probably kicked in. They had a reputation to carry on.
 

AUG

Major
Retired Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
6,998
Location
Texas
I haven't read the book but I like that part of the title that says ..."The Confederacy's Most Celebrated Unit" . Maybe I'm a little prejudice? I can see how being that far from home would have an impact initially but not for four years. Then unit pride probably kicked in. They had a reputation to carry on.
They did also feel like they had a reputation to maintain - not just for their combat record, but also because they were well known for being the only Texans in Lee's army and felt as if they represented their state therein.

Due to all these reasons the brigade did maintain a high morale throughout the war and suffered very few desertions, though the latter was probably also due to the fact they were so far from home. Although it did have trouble replacing losses from battle and disease. Some recruiting officers were sent home during the first half of the war, but that was no longer an option after the fall of Vicksburg; and as the war progressed, there were fewer and fewer Texans back home who were willing to fight in the East. The brigade continued to consist almost entirely of the originals who enlisted in 1861.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

CPT JB

Private
Joined
Jul 13, 2019
Messages
84
The book, “They Will Do to Tie Too” is an Excellent book on the 3rd Arkansas and the Texas Brigade from the Arkansas Perspective. I recommend it as well in researching Hood’s Brigade. I love the inscription on the monument to Hood’s Brigade. Just like the global war on terrorism service, in simple obedience to duty. To American Service members means you give it all you have got. Above and beyond the call of duty was their duty!
 
Top