How an Irish Family Stayed Connected Though Separated by an Ocean

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Pat Young

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Damian Shiels has another interesting post over at Irish in the American Civil War. Damian used the death of one Irish regular to explore the communications patterns among Irish immigrants both with family back in Ireland and among themselves in America. A point he likes to make with his research is that many immigrants maintained family and friendship connections even though separated by hundreds and even thousands of miles:
https://irishamericancivilwar.com/2017/05/19/the-death-of-a-regular-revealing-an-irelandnew-jerseymissouri-emigrant-network/
 

JPK Huson 1863

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I still do not understand how they did it. Keeping in touch, much less ensuring these vital matters were attended to- and it remained vital to them. I know of 2nd cousins unaware they're related and are only slightly interested on being told so- these family ( and friend ) connections were held so sacred, no effort was too great keeping the connection. It's quite lovely.

The only way to explain what you read in Shield's article is they cared, and so deeply it was part of the culture. You wonder how in blazes that aspect of the Irish was missed in all the yelling over them and Nash's repulsive pen neglected it? There were sure plenty of examples otherwise, but will shush- suffice to say not Irish.
 

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Damian Shiels has another interesting post over at Irish in the American Civil War. Damian used the death of one Irish regular to explore the communications patterns among Irish immigrants both with family back in Ireland and among themselves in America. A point he likes to make with his research is that many immigrants maintained family and friendship connections even though separated by hundreds and even thousands of miles:
https://irishamericancivilwar.com/2017/05/19/the-death-of-a-regular-revealing-an-irelandnew-jerseymissouri-emigrant-network/
It seems we don't have an outcome to this story re: whether Ellens' aunt ever received her letters, or got word of her son's death. Am I reading this right Pat?? If so, I can only imagine something must have happened to her as well...
 
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Pat Young

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I still do not understand how they did it. Keeping in touch, much less ensuring these vital matters were attended to- and it remained vital to them. I know of 2nd cousins unaware they're related and are only slightly interested on being told so- these family ( and friend ) connections were held so sacred, no effort was too great keeping the connection. It's quite lovely.

The only way to explain what you read in Shield's article is they cared, and so deeply it was part of the culture. You wonder how in blazes that aspect of the Irish was missed in all the yelling over them and Nash's repulsive pen neglected it? There were sure plenty of examples otherwise, but will shush- suffice to say not Irish.
Strangely, these apes seemed to have had emotional lives.
 

Pat Young

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It seems we don't have an outcome to this story re: whether Ellens' aunt ever received her letters, or got word of her son's death. Am I reading this right Pat?? If so, I can only imagine something must have happened to her as well...
Damian can only take us as far as the surviving records go. Interestingly, he conducts nearly all of his research from Cork in Ireland.
 
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