HONORING WILLIAM "TEN CENT BILL" YOPP -Black Confederate Veteran/Drummer 14th Georgia Infantry

Belle Montgomery

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#1
I am posting what I found please do not attack me:

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There was something special, even magical, which took place under the golden dome of the Georgia Capitol on the 5th day of March. The occasion was the signing of a proclamation honoring Confederate Memorial Day in Georgia. With a few strokes of his pen, Georgia governor Sonny Perdue signed a proclamation which honored a black man, who was a soldier of the Confederate army. After serving with master Thomas Yopp, Bill lost touch with his life long friend for more than forty years. The winds of fate brought these men together in Atlanta after the end of World War I. Those winds still whirl around the capital city and on this day brought together a new circle of friends, bound together for the common love and admiration of a single man, some loving him for just being their great great granddaddy and others just in tribute for his undying love for his friends, despite the obstacles society put in his way.

Rosa Chappell, of Laurens County, began inquiring about any available information on her ancestor Bill Yopp. On another front and completely unknown to anyone else who came to the governor's office that day, local realtor Rusty Henderson, a member of Georgia's Civil War Commission, proposed to the governor's office that this year the state honor Yopp, one of the most well known black Confederate soldiers in the South. Mrs. Chappell and Mr. Henderson met and the word spread among Bill's descendants. Up in Charlotte, North Carolina, Charlie Pittman was putting the finishing touches on his historical novel, Ten Cent Bill. Pittman, who has been studying the life of Bill Yopp for more than four years, had lost touch with his contact at the Laurens County Historical Society. He knew nothing of the ceremony until Betty Page's call to Joy Warren at the library's heritage center. Warren informed two researchers in the library
REST OF ARTICLE WITH PICS: http://laurenscountyafricanamerican...2014/02/honoring-ten-cent-bill-there-was.html

See ALSO: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10076434/william-h_-yopp
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Joined
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#3
I am posting what I found please do not attack me:

View attachment 290593 View attachment 290594
There was something special, even magical, which took place under the golden dome of the Georgia Capitol on the 5th day of March. The occasion was the signing of a proclamation honoring Confederate Memorial Day in Georgia. With a few strokes of his pen, Georgia governor Sonny Perdue signed a proclamation which honored a black man, who was a soldier of the Confederate army. After serving with master Thomas Yopp, Bill lost touch with his life long friend for more than forty years. The winds of fate brought these men together in Atlanta after the end of World War I. Those winds still whirl around the capital city and on this day brought together a new circle of friends, bound together for the common love and admiration of a single man, some loving him for just being their great great granddaddy and others just in tribute for his undying love for his friends, despite the obstacles society put in his way.

Rosa Chappell, of Laurens County, began inquiring about any available information on her ancestor Bill Yopp. On another front and completely unknown to anyone else who came to the governor's office that day, local realtor Rusty Henderson, a member of Georgia's Civil War Commission, proposed to the governor's office that this year the state honor Yopp, one of the most well known black Confederate soldiers in the South. Mrs. Chappell and Mr. Henderson met and the word spread among Bill's descendants. Up in Charlotte, North Carolina, Charlie Pittman was putting the finishing touches on his historical novel, Ten Cent Bill. Pittman, who has been studying the life of Bill Yopp for more than four years, had lost touch with his contact at the Laurens County Historical Society. He knew nothing of the ceremony until Betty Page's call to Joy Warren at the library's heritage center. Warren informed two researchers in the library
REST OF ARTICLE WITH PICS: http://laurenscountyafricanamerican...2014/02/honoring-ten-cent-bill-there-was.html

See ALSO: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10076434/william-h_-yopp
View attachment 290595
Great post, thanks for sharing !
 
Joined
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Messages
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#4
Was he actually approved by the Confederate Government to be a soldier in the Confederate Army? WHO is designating him as a soldier?

Kevin Dally
 
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#6
You'll have to ask those who researched him edited; modern politics
Are they the Confederate Government, I think not. I just don't see proof that he had the status of a "soldier" in the Confederacy's eyes, they set the enlistment rules, not someone in modern times. We can recognize him for what he did, but I don't see him being a "soldier" like the article states.

Kevin Dally
 
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Belle Montgomery

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
1,691
Location
44022
#9
Are they the Confederate Government, I think not. I just don't see proof that he had the status of a "soldier" in the Confederacy's eyes, they set the enlistment rules, not someone in modern times. We can recognize him for what he did, but I don't see him being a "soldier" like the article states.

Kevin Dally
I see that his owner is but then again what was the protocol back then considering he was "property?"
Yopp, Thomas M.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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#10
I see that his owner is but then again what was the protocol back then considering he was "property?"
Yopp, Thomas M.
And...you hit a good point, he was property, a truthful status that is correct.
The problem with the article is too much is made of him being a "soldier" giving one the impression that was his status, and not just someone's property.
Folk seem to forget that the status of soldier back then, didn't apply to blacks/slaves like folk think it does today.
"Colored Soldier" is historically misleading when it comes to the Confederacy in 1861-65.

Kevin Dally
 
Joined
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Messages
448
Location
NC Piedmont
#11
In one of the regiments of my ancestors, there were two free blacks who are recognized as serving in that regiment as musicians. Austin Dix was a free black who was listed as the drummer and Dick Slate was listed as a musician. Both men freely enlisted in May 1861. Dick Slate was discharged in 1862 and Austin Dix served until the summer of 1863. While they may not carried arms in combat they are listed on the regimental roster as having served in uniform for the Confederacy. The regiment they served in was the 18th Virginia Infantry.
 

Belle Montgomery

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 25, 2017
Messages
1,691
Location
44022
#12
And...you hit a good point, he was property, a truthful status that is correct.
The problem with the article is too much is made of him being a "soldier" giving one the impression that was his status, and not just someone's property.
Folk seem to forget that the status of soldier back then, didn't apply to blacks/slaves like folk think it does today.
"Colored Soldier" is historically misleading when it comes to the Confederacy in 1861-65.

Kevin Dally
Nonetheless being that he was a musician wouldn't that make his status Confederate? Weren't musicians considered more than just "cooks" etc.?
 



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