Honor Confederate and Union Navy Men!

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gentlemanrob

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Apr 11, 2016
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NE Georgia
We often hear everyday of people visiting and honoring the graves of Confederate and Union Army Generals but we rarely hear anything about remembering the Confederate and Union Navy officers. There a lot of Navy officers I have learned recently who rarely have anyone visit their graves at all. There are books on Confederate and Union Army General graves but I know of none on Confederate and Union Navy Officer graves. When I work on my book on Confederate Generals, Statesmen, Colonels and Doctors I always make sure that if their is a Navy Officer buried in the same cemetery that this officer gets the recognition he deserves. To me the Navy is just as important as the Army officers. So for us who visit cemeteries to honor these men always make sure if their is a navy officer buried in the same cemetery that he gets his well deserved honor and respect as well.
 

Ragged Old First

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Mar 15, 2019
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A VIRTUAL CEMETERY CREATED BY SHELLEY
Hunley Crew Members

H. L. Hunley was a submarine of the Confederate States of America that played a small part in the American Civil War. The Confederacy lost 21 crewmen in three sinkings of the Hunley during her short career. The submarine was named for her inventor, Horace Lawson Hunley, shortly after it was taken into service under the control of the Confederate Army at Charleston, South Carolina.First Crew: Frank Doyle, Absolum Williams, John Kelly, Nicholas Davis, Michael CaneThe first crew was lost on August 29, 1863, while preparing to make a test dive to learn the operation of the submarine when Lieutenant Payne accidentally stepped on the lever controlling the sub's diving planes while the boat was running. This caused Hunley to dive with her hatches still open, flooding the submarine. Payne and two others escaped, while the remaining five crewmen drowned.They were originally interred at a mariner's graveyard off the bank of the Ashley River. The graveyard had been Charleston's mariners' cemetery during the war. The site was mistakenly covered over when Johnson Hagood football stadium was built on it in 1948, the graves of the five Hunley crewman and 22 other Confederate sailors and marines and one child. Historians discovered the remains of the Hunley's first crew in June of 1999, during an archaeological dig beneath The Citadel's football stadium. On March 25, 2000, more than 2,500 people came to Magnolia Cemetery to bury the five crewmembers with full military honors. They were buried alongside the H. L. Hunley's second crew in Magnolia Cemetery.Second Crew: Horace L. Hunley, Robert Brockbank, Joseph Patterson, Thomas W. Park, Charles McHugh, Henry Beard, John Marshall, Charles L. SpragueThe second crew was lost on October 15, 1863 when the Hunley failed to surface during a mock attack, killing all 8 crewmen, including her designer/builder Horace Hunley, was not part of her crew. It is not known why he was at the helm when the submarine sank for the second time. A few days after the sinking, the submarine was raised. On November 8, 1863 the Captain and namesake of the history-making submarine, Horace L. Hunley was buried at Magnolia Cemetery. The very next day, November 9, the other seven crewmembers were also buried at Magnolia, all with full military honors. In the first two cases, the Confederate Navy salvaged the vessel and returned her to service.Third Crew: Lieutenant George E. Dixon (Commander), Frank Collins, Joseph F. Ridgaway, James A. Wicks, Arnold Becker, Corporal C. F. Carlsen, C. Lumpkin, and Augustus MillerThe third crew was lost on the night of February 17, 1864, when the Hunley made her first and only attack against a live target. The vessel was the USS Housatonic as it was stationed at the entrance to Charleston, South Carolina harbor, about 5 miles (8 kilometers) out to sea. In an effort to break the naval blockade of the city, Lieutenant George E. Dixon and a crew of seven volunteers attacked Housatonic, successfully embedding the barbed spar torpedo into her hull. The torpedo was detonated as the submarine backed away, sending Housatonic and five of her crew to the bottom in five minutes. For reasons that are still unproven, after the attack, the H.L. Hunley failed to return to her base. It was over 130 years before the wreckage was found.The wreck was found in April 1995 about 100 yards away from the Housatonic in 27 feet (8 m) of water. It was buried under several feet of silt, which had concealed and protected the vessel for more than a hundred years. The in situ underwater archaeological investigation and excavation culminated with the raising of Hunley on August 8, 2000. On August 8, 2000, at 8:37 a.m., the sub broke the surface for the first time in more than 136 years, greeted by a cheering crowd on shore and in surrounding watercraft.On April 17, 2004 the remains of the final crew were laid to rest at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina alongside the remains of the first two crews.

21 memorials

https://www.findagrave.com/virtual-cemetery/387059?page=1#sr-5793754
 
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Ragged Old First

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Mar 15, 2019
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A VIRTUAL CEMETERY CREATED BY RUBBINGS
USS Monitor
USS Monitor, a 987-ton armored turret gunboat, was built at New York to the design of John Ericsson. She was the first of what became a large number of "monitors" in the United States and other navies. Commissioned on 25 February 1862, she soon was underway for Hampton Roads, Virginia. Monitor arrived there on 9 March, and was immediately sent into action against the Confederate ironclad Virginia , which had sunk two U.S. Navy ships the previous day. The resulting battle, the first between iron-armored warships, was a tactical draw. However, Monitor prevented the Virginia from gaining control of Hampton Roads and thus preserved the Federal blockade of the Norfolk area.Following this historic action, Monitor remained in the Hampton Roads area and, in mid-1862 was actively employed along the James River in support of the Army's Peninsular Campaign. In late December 1862, Monitor was ordered south for further operations. Caught in a storm off Cape Hatteras, she foundered on 31 December. Her wreck was discovered in 1974 and is now a marine sanctuary. Work is presently underway to recover major components of her structure and machinery, to be followed by extensive preservation efforts and ultimate museum exhibition.

83 memorials

https://www.findagrave.com/virtual-cemetery/277454
 
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