Historian Kate Masur wants to know why 6,000 Confederates are buried in Chicago

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ronzzo

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I read a little about her. She seems well known in the CW field and co-edits a Journal on the War. She's part of a movement that feels we need to teach more about the Civil War so that the complexity of the War is known to more people. She has not advocated for removing monuments that I have seen (though admittedly I did not spend a long time reading her work). She has pushed for signs at monuments that add more information.
If she is pushing for more information on monuments such as this and on the complexity of Wade Hampton in the late 1880’s as to why he was permitted to dedicate this monument, then her Twitter post and the protest signs in her photo don’t seem to indicate this.
 
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It's just rather bizarre to me, if one wants to look for injustice in the subject.......the poor care and conditions provided by the United States to prisoners in its care at Camp Douglas would seem the obvious one to highlight.
 

Rhea Cole

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I tell you what, I am willing to take all the "...I'll bet..." "...she doesn't know about the history..." etc. & posts to that effect. Consider this an online handshake. $1,000.00 paid to a Civil War battlefield preservation fund. It is on the honor system, if you loose, just write the check & send it in. Let's take a look at Dr Masur's Civil War History credentials.

Let's begin with Dr. Masur's Facebook Videos,

Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College
Reconstruction Era National Historical Park`Ranger Chat with Dr. Kate Masur
Video (US National Park Service) April 16, 2020
Black Politics in Civil War Washington C-Span January 25, 2014
Finding the Source With Prof. Kate Masur, November 23, 2020, "...discussion series with leading historians..."

Perhaps a list of her books available on Amazon will answer any questions regarding Dr. Masur's cred.

Until Justice Be Done: America's First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction.

An Example for All the Land: Emancipation & the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C.

Online publication

Journal of the Civil War Era, Published online by UNC Press, author: Kate Masur & Gregg Downs.

Topics include 'The Politics of Faith: How Contests Within Sacred Space Shaped Post-Emancipation Society

Civil War History: A Call to Action

Editorial contributor to Reconstruction: The Official National Park Service Handbook

Consultant for 2019 documentary, Reconstruction: America After the Civil War

Here is a chance to put your money where your mouth was, The American Battlefield Trust is my charity of choice, but you all can write your checks to any organization that does historic preservation that you choose.
 
This happened back in September 2020. Dr. Masur also protested with other historians at Gettysburg a few days later. Here are two quotes in regards to Dr. Masur from the article link posted below:

“We’re trying to poke holes in Lost Cause mythology, to show how it’s inaccurate,” said Kate Masur, a professor at Northwestern, referring to the depiction of the Confederate cause as a noble and just one. Prof. Masur, who coedits the journal with Prof. Downs, explained that they 'want to add to history, by showing more of the African-American history that has been erased."

In Chicago, Prof. Masur was at "Confederate Mound," a monument in Oak Woods Cemetery, on the South Side. “This monument was a white supremacist project,” one of her hand-lettered signs read.

In an image posted to Twitter, it was propped up against the official plaque, which makes no mention of slavery.

The monument marks the burial site of some of the 4,000 Confederate soldiers who died at Camp Douglas, a Union prisoner-of-war camp on Chicago’s South Side. The dedication of the monument in 1895 drew 100,000 people and, one of Prof. Masur’s signs pointed out, featured a speech by Wade Hampton III, who was a Confederate officer and, after the war, a leader of the Red Shirts, a white supremacist militia that violently suppressed the Black vote. In his address, he lamented how “the best blood of the country” — North and South — had been “poured out like water on many a battlefield.”

The contributions of Black Civil War soldiers, Prof. Masur said, receive very little memorialization, even in the North. At some other sites on Saturday, participants highlighted the ways Black Americans had held their own commemorations.

 

DanSBHawk

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Location
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The "WeWantMoreHistory" initiative is about providing more history. More information. More context. More learning. I don't know why anyone would be opposed to that.
 

DanSBHawk

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But obviously the 4000 there were connected to a specific one, so would think it should be the focus.
That's fine, but the story of why they were there (rather than paroled) should be told as well. As well as discussing the other camps that were as bad or worse.
 

GwilymT

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Location
Pittsburgh
I tell you what, I am willing to take all the "...I'll bet..." "...she doesn't know about the history..." etc. & posts to that effect. Consider this an online handshake. $1,000.00 paid to a Civil War battlefield preservation fund. It is on the honor system, if you loose, just write the check & send it in. Let's take a look at Dr Masur's Civil War History credentials.

Let's begin with Dr. Masur's Facebook Videos,

Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College
Reconstruction Era National Historical Park`Ranger Chat with Dr. Kate Masur
Video (US National Park Service) April 16, 2020
Black Politics in Civil War Washington C-Span January 25, 2014
Finding the Source With Prof. Kate Masur, November 23, 2020, "...discussion series with leading historians..."

Perhaps a list of her books available on Amazon will answer any questions regarding Dr. Masur's cred.

Until Justice Be Done: America's First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction.

An Example for All the Land: Emancipation & the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C.

Online publication

Journal of the Civil War Era, Published online by UNC Press, author: Kate Masur & Gregg Downs.

Topics include 'The Politics of Faith: How Contests Within Sacred Space Shaped Post-Emancipation Society

Civil War History: A Call to Action

Editorial contributor to Reconstruction: The Official National Park Service Handbook

Consultant for 2019 documentary, Reconstruction: America After the Civil War

Here is a chance to put your money where your mouth was, The American Battlefield Trust is my charity of choice, but you all can write your checks to any organization that does historic preservation that you choose.
Be careful, we don’t want any checks going to the League of the South or other white supremacist groups. 😂
 
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The "WeWantMoreHistory" initiative is about providing more history. More information. More context. More learning. I don't know why anyone would be opposed to that.
Agree......just her tweet asked a question that she then never answered, as he was there to dedicate a monument to those who died from being held in poor conditions during the war at Camp Douglas......

And honestly quotes from Du Bois 37 years after the dedication or how many slaves Hampton owned 30 years before he spoke at the dedication have little to do with the monument.

Still seems as an educator she did a rather poor job of answering the question she herself posed......

If her focus was on Hampton being at a 1895 dedication.....the relevant number of slaves he owned then was zero.....

The reason for the dead and monument is extremely simple.....but her presentism went here, there everywhere, but the simple reason the monument/ the dead/ and the dedication was there..........
 
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DanSBHawk

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Wisconsin
Agree......just her tweet asked a question that she then never answered, as he was there to dedicate a monument to those who died from being held in poor conditions during the war at Camp Douglas......

And honestly quotes from Du Bois 37 years after the dedication or how many slaves Hampton owned 30 years before he spoke at the dedication have little to do with the monument.

Still seems as an educator she did a rather poor job of answering the question she posed......

If her focus was on Hampton being at a 1895 dedication.....the relevant number of slaves he owned then was zero
Tweets and handheld signs are not meant to be encyclopedic.
 

RobertP

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Location
Dallas
In the article linked in Post #25 of this thread we find this:


Up to three-fourths of the cost of the monument came from donations from Chicago citizens, including businessmen like Marshall Field, Potter Palmer, George Pullman, and Ferdinand Peck, whose brainchild is the landmark Auditorium Building at the corner of Michigan and Congress. Peck served as a leader of the committee that organized the dedication of the monument on May 30, 1895, and the extravagant dinners and aristocratic affairs leading up to the ceremony.

The festivities and the monument cost $25,000 altogether, or nearly $676,000 in 2017 dollars. At the dedication dinner, former Confederate and Union generals, local businessmen, and the mayor of Chicago gave toasts. The next day, Memorial Day, former Confederates and union soldiers marched together, with thousands of Chicagoans joining and cheering them on. Indeed, etched into a plaque near the monument are thanks to the “Liberal Citizens of Chicago” whose donations helped finance Confederate Mound. An estimated 100,000 people attended the dedication ceremony in Greater Grand Crossing, including President Grover Cleveland. It was hailed by Chicago papers as a historic event unlike any the nation had seen—symbolized reconciliation between North and South.


Yet in the article linked in Post #45 of this thread we read:

In Chicago, Prof. Masur was at "Confederate Mound,"a monument in Oak Woods Cemetery, on the South Side. “This monument was a white supremacist project,” one of her hand-lettered signs read.


All the local history of this place readily available to #wewantmorehistory maven yet what she chooses to focus in on the name of Wade Hampton. Wonder why?
 
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