Hilliard's Legion


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JWheeler331

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#22
Over the years I have collected several photos of Hilliard's Legion Men. I was drawn to photos of these men because a number of them were photographed in a jacket that I have not seen on any other men. Men photographed with the jacket that im talking about have always been either Hilliard's Legion or some other type of Alabama Cav.

I have attached a photo of an unidentified Hilliard's Legion Man who is wearing the jacket that I am talking about. I have always been fond of this jacket.
 

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mikekj

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#23
There is a book, written in 1867, and though out of print for many years, can be found in some archives called "A History of the Sixtieth Alabama Regiment, Gracie's Alabama Brigade. It's author was a soldier, named Lewellyn Shaver.

Hilliard's Legion eventually became the 60th Ala.

This is a very good book and follows them through the entire war.

I have a GGGFather that was in this unit. Pvt. Elisha Gideon Hubbard
 

ErnieMac

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#24
IIRC there was a fair amount of activity along the Tennessee River and the Memphis & Charleston Railroad between the end of the Siege of Corinth (ended May 30, 1862) and the start of the 1862 Kentucky Campaign (began mid-August, 1862). Ormsby Mitchel's division of Buell's Army of the Ohio being the main Federal unit in the area. Skirmishes at towns like Athens, Decatur, Bridgeport, Stevenson, etc. Chattanooga was the Confederate hub for this activity.
 
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#25
Over the years I have collected several photos of Hilliard's Legion Men. I was drawn to photos of these men because a number of them were photographed in a jacket that I have not seen on any other men. Men photographed with the jacket that im talking about have always been either Hilliard's Legion or some other type of Alabama Cav.

I have attached a photo of an unidentified Hilliard's Legion Man who is wearing the jacket that I am talking about. I have always been fond of this jacket.
JW,
A great photo you have. I would imagine my 2nd g-gfather Andrew J. Hancock possibly wore something similar since he was in Hilliard's Calvary, too. - (A quick thought here: Since your photo is an unidentified soldier this could even be a photo of my Andrew! :smile:

Thank you,

JB Texas
 

M E Wolf

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#29
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Depends on who is on Moderator status and checks the queue. There can be a day's length wait to a 1 second wait time, with everything in between.

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July 22, 2014, 11:38 p.m.
 

JWheeler331

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#33
JW,
A great photo you have. I would imagine my 2nd g-gfather Andrew J. Hancock possibly wore something similar since he was in Hilliard's Calvary, too. - (A quick thought here: Since your photo is an unidentified soldier this could even be a photo of my Andrew! :smile:

Thank you,

JB Texas

I guess it is possible.

Here is another. His name was Charles Augustus Holladay and he was in Company A Hilliard's Legion.
 

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#34
I guess it is possible.

Here is another. His name was Charles Augustus Holladay and he was in Company A Hilliard's Legion.
JW
The visual image of Holladay is interesting to see and to think about. It somehow makes the mental vision of my relative more concrete and real when I imagine his short life. Thank you for sharing your photo.

JB Texas
 

JWheeler331

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#35
Notice the jacket worn in both photos. Ever since I first seen that unusual jacket it has been my favorite. I always save the photo when I see a man wearing that type of jacket. I have only found those on Alabama Soldiers, mostly Cav.
 
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#36
I have encountered the Cavalry of Hillard's Legion during my research of the 3rd Battalion Georgia Infantry. The official records are strangely silent on them during the whole of Kirby Smith's invasion of Kentucky. I only find one single mention of them in the Official records during this campaign....(The 3rd Battalion Georgia Infantry was commanded by Lt. Col. Marcellus Augustus Stovall)

OR Series 1, Vol. 16, Part 2, Page 874


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,
Lexington, Ky., September 25, 1862.


Colonel ARCH. GRACIE, Commanding Posts:


COLONEL: You will direct Colonel Stovall with his battalion, as much of Hanvey's battery as can be gotten ready, and the cavalry of Hiliard's Legion, to proceed with at least three day's rations to Winchester; from thence Colonel Stovall will send the cavalry in the direction of Irvine to watch the enemy should he approach that way, and instruct the commanding officer to report frequently. Colonel Stavall will await at Winchester further instruction from the commanding general.


By command of Major General E. Kirby Smith:


JNumbers PEGRAM,


Chief of Staff.



I have so far found no evidence that this move was ever carried out however. The few diaries that I have read show the 3rd Battalion Georgia Infantry remaining in Lexington and acting as Provost Guards until the retreat from Kentucky.
 

M E Wolf

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#37
Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
ALABAMA--BY LIEUT.-GEN. JOSEPH WHEELER.


Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
ALABAMA--BIOGRAPHICAL.
Brigadier-General Archibald Gracie was the son of Archibald Gracie, a merchant of Mobile for seventeen years prior to the Confederate war. His grandfather was one of the rich merchants of New York. His mother was Miss Bethune, of Charleston, S.C. General Gracie was born in New York, December 1, 1833. When of suitable age he attended for five years a school in Europe. In September, 1850, he was appointed to the United States military academy from New Jersey. On graduation,in 1854, he was promoted in the army to brevet second lieutenant of infantry. He served on frontier duty in Washington territory; on an expedition against the Snake Indians; was engaged with much credit near Walla Walla; afterward at Fort Boise, and again at Fort Vancouver. In 1856 he resigned and became a member of his father's firm in Mobile, displaying much capacity for business, and enjoying home life with his wife, Miss Mayo, of Virginia, a relative of Gen. Winfield Scott. He did not, however, lose his fondness for the military life, joining the Washington light infantry of Mobile and becoming its captain. Just before the secession of Alabama Governor Moore instructed him to seize Mount Vernon arsenal, which he promptly did. Shortly after, this company, the first from Alabama mustered into the Confederate service, became a part of the Third Alabama infantry. Proceeding to Virginia with his regiment, Captain Gracie was promoted to major of the Eleventh Alabama, July 12, 1861. Later he obtained authority to raise a regiment, which he did in the spring of 1862, and was elected colonel. This was the Forty-third Alabama, and was assigned to the corps led by Gen. Kirby Smith, operating in east Tennessee. Toward the latter part of August, 1862, Colonel Gracie was put in command of a brigade and led an expedition from Clinton northward to Jacks-boro, and across the Cumberland mountains into Scott county, where he attacked Fort Cliff, defended by a body of Tennessee loyalists under Colonel Cliff. He captured the fort, whose defenders fled after making a slight show of resistance. He led his regiment through the Kentucky campaign, was commandant of the town of Lexington during its occupancy by the Confederates, and of Cumberland Gap after the return to Tennessee. In November, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general; his command consisted of the Forty-third Alabama, Sixty-third Tennessee, and the First, Second, Third and Fourth battalions of the Hilliard legion, until after the battle of Chickamauga.
Then the legion was divided into the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Alabama regiments, and Twenty-third Alabama battalion, and continued under him; while the Forty-first Alabama was substituted for the Sixty-third Tennessee. General Gracie participated in the battle of Chickamauga, where the intrepid conduct of himself and his brigade is shown by the fact that within two hours it lost 705 killed and wounded out of 1,870 in action. When Longstreet was ordered into east Tennessee, Gracie's brigade formed part of his force, and suffered severely at Bean's Station, where Gracie also received a painful wound in the arm. As soon as he recovered he rejoined his brigade, which was assigned to the Richmond and Petersburg lines, under General Beauregard, during the campaign of May, 1864. He had a horse killed under him in a skirmish before Richmond, and led the brigade at Drewry's Bluff, winning approving mention. From June until his death he was constantly in the trenches before Petersburg in the active work of Bushrod Johnson's division, his position being famous as Gracie's salient. While inspecting the enemy's line, with telescope in hand, he was struck in the head by a bullet from a shrapnel shell and instantly killed, December 2, 1864. He was buried in Hollywood cemetery, but shortly after the war his remains were conveyed to the family vault in New York City. The men of his brigade, in assemblage, paid this tribute to him: "He was a brave and excellent soldier . . . a sincere friend without an atom of selfishness; without one trait, however small, to detract from the nobleness of his nature; always anxious for the comfort and safety of his men; of cheerful and genial manner; a member of the church and a true Christian. In fine, a gentleman and a soldier, without fear and without blemish." To this tribute from his men should be added the expressions of Gen. Robert E. Lee in a letter to his own wife: "The death of General Gracie was a great grief to me. I do not know how to replace him. He was an excellent officer and a Christian gentleman. I had been all over his line with him the day before his death, and decided on some changes I wished made. He had just received the telegram announcing the birth of his daughter, and expected to visit his wife the next day. Our loss is heavy, but his gain great. May his wife, whom he loved so tenderly, be comforted in the recollection of his many virtues, his piety, his worth, his love."
---------------
Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
ALABAMA--CHAPTER IV.

HILLIARD'S LEGION.
Hilliard's Legion was organized at Montgomery, June, 1862, and consisted of five battalions; one of these, a mounted battalion, was early detached and became part of the Tenth Confederate cavalry.
The Legion proceeded to Montgomery nearly 3,000 strong, under the command of Col. H. W. Hilliard, and was placed in McCown's brigade. It took part in the siege of Cumberland Gap, and spent the fall and winter in Kentucky and east Tennessee. In April, Col. J. Thorington took command of the Legion, and was succeeded in command of the First battalion by Lieut.-Col. J. Holt, the whole Legion serving in Gracie's brigade at Chickamauga. In this battle it earned a splendid reputation. The First and Second battalions suffered the heaviest loss, leaving more than half their number either dead or wounded on the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Holt was severely wounded, and the command of the First battalion fell upon Captain Huguley. Maj. Daniel S. Troy was in command after Chickamauga. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall and Captain Walden, successively in command of the Second battalion, were both wounded. This battalion was the first to plant its banner on the enemy's works. The colors were pierced by 83 bullets. The standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, was made a lieutenant. The other battalions also fought nobly and suffered severely both in officers and men. The Third was complimented on the field by General Pond. The legion continued fighting in Gracie's brigade in east Tennessee until, on November 25, 1863, it was dissolved. Parts of the First and Third were consolidated and formed the Sixtieth Alabama, under Col. J. W. A. Sanford; the Second and Fourth, under Col. Bolling Hall, Jr., became the Fifty-ninth Alabama. Three companies of the First battalion became the Twenty-third battalion, or Stallworth's sharpshooters. The history of the legion is continued in the records of these organizations.

EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.
Vol. XVI, Part I--(1010) September 22, 1862, at Cumberland Gap.

Vol. XVI, Part 2--(708) June 26, 1862, ordered to Chattanooga. (717) July 2d, mentioned by secretary of war. (720) July 4th, ordered to Atlanta, Ga. (726) July 11th, ordered to Chattanooga to report to Major-General McCown. (748) Mentioned by J. F. Belton, as ordered to report to General Stevenson, August 8th. (824) Reeves' (Fourth) battalion at Clinton, September 14th. (847, 873) September, at Cumberland Gap. (874) September 25th, cavalry ordered to Winchester. (975) Cavalry under Maj. M. M. Slaughter ordered to Flat Lick, October 22d. (984) October 31st, in McCown's division, Gen. E. Kirby Smith's force.

Vol. XX, Part 2--(412-414) November 20, 1862, headquarters Knoxville, Tenn., 1,095 present for duty; four battalions formed the Fifth brigade. (466) December 27th, First and Fourth battalions at Big Creek Gap; Second battalion at Cumberland Gap; Third battalion at Clinton.

Vol. XXIII, Part 2--(644, 645) February 20, 1863, with Gen. D. S. Donelson. First and Fourth battalions at Big Creek Gap; Second at Cumberland Gap; Third at Knoxville; Company A, First battalion, at Bristol. (711) March 9th, battalions as above. First battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. Thorington; Second, Lieut.-Col. Bolling Hall, Jr.; Third, Lieut..Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Maj. W. N. Reeves. Two companies of First at Clinton, one at Bristol. (792) April 25th, under Col. J. Thoring-ton, in Gracie's brigade, headquarters Bean's Station, Tenn. (946) July 31, 1863, assignment as above. First battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Holt; Second, Lieut.-Col. B. Hall, Jr.; Third, Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Major McLennan; headquarters, Cumberland Gap. (949) August 3d, three battalions from Cumberland Gap ordered to Strawberry Plains to report to General Gracie.

No. 42--(556) General Clanton says that at Chickamauga, the colors of the Second battalion were pierced by eighty-two balls, and President Davis promoted Lieu-tenant-Colonel Hall to colonel, and the color-bearer to a lieutenancy. Says the Legion is in Gracie's brigade, May, 1864.

No. 51--(16) September 19 and 20, 1863, in Gracie's brigade, Bragg's army. (416) Gen. William Preston in his report of Chickamauga says: "The brigade advanced with splendid courage, but was met by a destructive fire of the enemy from the cover of their fieldworks on the hill. The Second Alabama battalion stormed the hill and entered the intrenchments. Here an obstinate and bloody combat ensued. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall was severely wounded while gallantly leading his command in the assault on the hill. The Second battalion, out of 239, lost 169 killed and wounded. In the action its colors were pierced in 83 places, and were afterward, by request, presented to his Excellency, the President, who promoted the brave standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, for conspicuous courage. George W. Norris, of Captain Wise's company, of Hall's battalion, fell at the foot of the enemy's flagstaff and was buried where he so nobly died." Lieutenant-Colonel Holt, of the First battalion, was severely wounded. (418) General Preston commends the gallantry of Lieutenant-Colonel Sanford, Major McLennan, Captain Walden and Surgeon Luckie. (421, 422) General Gracie's report: "The First battalion, Alabama Legion, sustained the heaviest loss. Of 239 carried into action, 169 were killed and wounded. Among the latter was Lieutenant-Colonel Holt, seriously, in the knee. Among the killed, Lieut. R. H. Bibb ....

It was the Second battalion that first gained the hill and placed its colors on the enemy's works. Its colors bear marks of over eighty bullets. Its bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, though thrice wounded and the staff thrice shot away, carried his charge throughout the entire fight. He deserves not only mention, but promotion. Lieuten-ant-Colonel Hall behaved most gallantly, receiving a severe wound in the thigh. Capt. W. D. Walden, Company B, was wounded in the breast, arm and shoulder, inside the enemy's works. His case deserves special mention. Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford, commanding the Third battalion, Alabama Legion, nobly did his duty, sustaining heavy loss both in officers and men. Asst. Surgeon James B. Luckie, both in the field and at the hospital, was most attentive to the wounded, as, indeed, were all the medical officers of the command. Major McLennan, commanding the Fourth Alabama Legion, nobly did his duty, sustaining heavy loss both in officers and men." General Gracie also says: "To Lieutenant Gilmer, adjutant of the Alabama Legion, who, during the absence of its commander has acted as my assistant inspector-general, and to Messrs. George C. Jones and J. S. Harwell, both wounded, my thanks are due for services rendered at Chickamauga." (423) Col. Y. M. Moody, Forty-third Alabama, says: "This (Second) battalion assisted in holding enemy's works at Chickamauga. . . On September 19th, the Third battalion, Alabama Legion, was left on top of a slight elevation, to support Jeffries' and Baxter's batteries. We remained at this point until the morning of the 20th, exposed during evening of the 19th to enemy's shells." (424, 425) Captain Huguley, of First battalion, says: "Colonel Holt was severely wounded early in the action, and the command devolved on me. We went into the engagement with 238, and had 24 killed and 144 wounded, 16 of whom were officers." (425, 426) Lieut. C. Hall says: "Lieuten-ant-Colonel Hall, while leading the command under the fiercest fire, was shot down at a time when by hard fighting we had almost reached the enemy's works. Captain Walden assumed command, and bravely led the still advancing line until shot down within the enemy's lines. Lieutenant Fisher, a brave officer of Company C, about this time was mortally wounded. The works were carried and the enemy driven before us in confusion. The battalion carried into action 230 aggregate; of these, 16 were killed, 75 wounded, many mortally." Commends bravery of Capt. L. H. Crumpler and Lieut. John H. Porter. (426, 427) Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford says: "We (Third battalion) carried into the fight on the 20th instant, 229 men. Of this number, 4 were killed and 42 wounded." He especially commends for courage and skill, Capt. John McCreless, Surgeon James B. Luckie, Corporal Hutto and Privates Hix, Turner and Tally of Company A; Sergeant Baygents and Privates Jackson, Brooks and Hall of Company B; Private Brown, Company C; Privates Hufham, Quillan and Jesse L. Jackson of Company D; Sergeant Harris and Privates Harris, Lewis, Skinner and Williams of Company E; Privates Simmons, Patrick and Jackson of Company F. (427, 428) Major McLennan of Fourth battalion commends conduct of Privates McCain, Holly, King, Head, of Company A; Corporal French and Privates Anderson, Flournoy, Smith, of Company B; Sergeant Mahone, Sergeant Daniels and Privates Daniel, Hill, Rutledge, Bennett, of Company D; Sergeant Stuckey, Corporal Martin, Corporal Curable and Privates Phillips and Lancey, of Company E, for conspicuous gallantry on the field.

Roll of honor, Chickamauga, First battalion: Adjt. John Massey, Private John H. Conner,(*) Company A; Private J. E. Wright, Company B; Private James M. Gibson, Company C; Private B. A. Davis,(*) Company D; Sergt. J. L. Cox,(*) Company E; Private A. J. Daw,(*) Company F. Second battalion: Capt. W. D. Walden, Company B; Private John H. Randall, Company A; First Sergt. Socrates Spigener, Company B; Private Benj. F. Temple,(*) Company C; Private William P. Jones, Company D; Private George W. Norris,(*) Company E; Corp. Jos. V. Castlebury,(*) Company F. Third battalion: Capt. John McCreless, Company E; Private Micajah Kirkland,(*) Company A; Private John Blanken-ship, Company C; Private Henry R. Lewis, Company C. Fourth battalion: Private Jackson Lee,(*) Company A; Corp. James E. French, Company B; Private B. F. Martin,(*) Company D; Private R. S. Turlington,(*) Company E.

No. 54--(452) November 30, 1863, Gracie's brigade, Gen. B. R. Johnson's forces. First battalion, Maj. D. S. Troy; Second, Capt. John H. Dillard; Third, Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Maj. John D. McLennan. No. 55--(659) In Gracie's brigade, Buckner's division; detached November 22d, for operations against Burnside in east Tennessee.

No. 56--(891) December 31, 1863, Gracie's brigade, Longstreet's corps. Parts of First and Third (Sixtieth Alabama), under Colonel Sanford; Second and Fourth (Fifty-ninth Alabama), under Colonel Hall.
No. 78--(589) May, 1864, General Clanton speaks of Legion as in Gracie's brigade. Same mention as above, No. 42, p. 556.

(*) Killed in action.
------------------
M. E. Wolf
 
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#38
Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
ALABAMA--BY LIEUT.-GEN. JOSEPH WHEELER.


Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
ALABAMA--BIOGRAPHICAL.
Brigadier-General Archibald Gracie was the son of Archibald Gracie, a merchant of Mobile for seventeen years prior to the Confederate war. His grandfather was one of the rich merchants of New York. His mother was Miss Bethune, of Charleston, S.C. General Gracie was born in New York, December 1, 1833. When of suitable age he attended for five years a school in Europe. In September, 1850, he was appointed to the United States military academy from New Jersey. On graduation,in 1854, he was promoted in the army to brevet second lieutenant of infantry. He served on frontier duty in Washington territory; on an expedition against the Snake Indians; was engaged with much credit near Walla Walla; afterward at Fort Boise, and again at Fort Vancouver. In 1856 he resigned and became a member of his father's firm in Mobile, displaying much capacity for business, and enjoying home life with his wife, Miss Mayo, of Virginia, a relative of Gen. Winfield Scott. He did not, however, lose his fondness for the military life, joining the Washington light infantry of Mobile and becoming its captain. Just before the secession of Alabama Governor Moore instructed him to seize Mount Vernon arsenal, which he promptly did. Shortly after, this company, the first from Alabama mustered into the Confederate service, became a part of the Third Alabama infantry. Proceeding to Virginia with his regiment, Captain Gracie was promoted to major of the Eleventh Alabama, July 12, 1861. Later he obtained authority to raise a regiment, which he did in the spring of 1862, and was elected colonel. This was the Forty-third Alabama, and was assigned to the corps led by Gen. Kirby Smith, operating in east Tennessee. Toward the latter part of August, 1862, Colonel Gracie was put in command of a brigade and led an expedition from Clinton northward to Jacks-boro, and across the Cumberland mountains into Scott county, where he attacked Fort Cliff, defended by a body of Tennessee loyalists under Colonel Cliff. He captured the fort, whose defenders fled after making a slight show of resistance. He led his regiment through the Kentucky campaign, was commandant of the town of Lexington during its occupancy by the Confederates, and of Cumberland Gap after the return to Tennessee. In November, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general; his command consisted of the Forty-third Alabama, Sixty-third Tennessee, and the First, Second, Third and Fourth battalions of the Hilliard legion, until after the battle of Chickamauga.
Then the legion was divided into the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Alabama regiments, and Twenty-third Alabama battalion, and continued under him; while the Forty-first Alabama was substituted for the Sixty-third Tennessee. General Gracie participated in the battle of Chickamauga, where the intrepid conduct of himself and his brigade is shown by the fact that within two hours it lost 705 killed and wounded out of 1,870 in action. When Longstreet was ordered into east Tennessee, Gracie's brigade formed part of his force, and suffered severely at Bean's Station, where Gracie also received a painful wound in the arm. As soon as he recovered he rejoined his brigade, which was assigned to the Richmond and Petersburg lines, under General Beauregard, during the campaign of May, 1864. He had a horse killed under him in a skirmish before Richmond, and led the brigade at Drewry's Bluff, winning approving mention. From June until his death he was constantly in the trenches before Petersburg in the active work of Bushrod Johnson's division, his position being famous as Gracie's salient. While inspecting the enemy's line, with telescope in hand, he was struck in the head by a bullet from a shrapnel shell and instantly killed, December 2, 1864. He was buried in Hollywood cemetery, but shortly after the war his remains were conveyed to the family vault in New York City. The men of his brigade, in assemblage, paid this tribute to him: "He was a brave and excellent soldier . . . a sincere friend without an atom of selfishness; without one trait, however small, to detract from the nobleness of his nature; always anxious for the comfort and safety of his men; of cheerful and genial manner; a member of the church and a true Christian. In fine, a gentleman and a soldier, without fear and without blemish." To this tribute from his men should be added the expressions of Gen. Robert E. Lee in a letter to his own wife: "The death of General Gracie was a great grief to me. I do not know how to replace him. He was an excellent officer and a Christian gentleman. I had been all over his line with him the day before his death, and decided on some changes I wished made. He had just received the telegram announcing the birth of his daughter, and expected to visit his wife the next day. Our loss is heavy, but his gain great. May his wife, whom he loved so tenderly, be comforted in the recollection of his many virtues, his piety, his worth, his love."
---------------
Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
ALABAMA--CHAPTER IV.

HILLIARD'S LEGION.
Hilliard's Legion was organized at Montgomery, June, 1862, and consisted of five battalions; one of these, a mounted battalion, was early detached and became part of the Tenth Confederate cavalry.
The Legion proceeded to Montgomery nearly 3,000 strong, under the command of Col. H. W. Hilliard, and was placed in McCown's brigade. It took part in the siege of Cumberland Gap, and spent the fall and winter in Kentucky and east Tennessee. In April, Col. J. Thorington took command of the Legion, and was succeeded in command of the First battalion by Lieut.-Col. J. Holt, the whole Legion serving in Gracie's brigade at Chickamauga. In this battle it earned a splendid reputation. The First and Second battalions suffered the heaviest loss, leaving more than half their number either dead or wounded on the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Holt was severely wounded, and the command of the First battalion fell upon Captain Huguley. Maj. Daniel S. Troy was in command after Chickamauga. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall and Captain Walden, successively in command of the Second battalion, were both wounded. This battalion was the first to plant its banner on the enemy's works. The colors were pierced by 83 bullets. The standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, was made a lieutenant. The other battalions also fought nobly and suffered severely both in officers and men. The Third was complimented on the field by General Pond. The legion continued fighting in Gracie's brigade in east Tennessee until, on November 25, 1863, it was dissolved. Parts of the First and Third were consolidated and formed the Sixtieth Alabama, under Col. J. W. A. Sanford; the Second and Fourth, under Col. Bolling Hall, Jr., became the Fifty-ninth Alabama. Three companies of the First battalion became the Twenty-third battalion, or Stallworth's sharpshooters. The history of the legion is continued in the records of these organizations.

EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.
Vol. XVI, Part I--(1010) September 22, 1862, at Cumberland Gap.

Vol. XVI, Part 2--(708) June 26, 1862, ordered to Chattanooga. (717) July 2d, mentioned by secretary of war. (720) July 4th, ordered to Atlanta, Ga. (726) July 11th, ordered to Chattanooga to report to Major-General McCown. (748) Mentioned by J. F. Belton, as ordered to report to General Stevenson, August 8th. (824) Reeves' (Fourth) battalion at Clinton, September 14th. (847, 873) September, at Cumberland Gap. (874) September 25th, cavalry ordered to Winchester. (975) Cavalry under Maj. M. M. Slaughter ordered to Flat Lick, October 22d. (984) October 31st, in McCown's division, Gen. E. Kirby Smith's force.

Vol. XX, Part 2--(412-414) November 20, 1862, headquarters Knoxville, Tenn., 1,095 present for duty; four battalions formed the Fifth brigade. (466) December 27th, First and Fourth battalions at Big Creek Gap; Second battalion at Cumberland Gap; Third battalion at Clinton.

Vol. XXIII, Part 2--(644, 645) February 20, 1863, with Gen. D. S. Donelson. First and Fourth battalions at Big Creek Gap; Second at Cumberland Gap; Third at Knoxville; Company A, First battalion, at Bristol. (711) March 9th, battalions as above. First battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. Thorington; Second, Lieut.-Col. Bolling Hall, Jr.; Third, Lieut..Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Maj. W. N. Reeves. Two companies of First at Clinton, one at Bristol. (792) April 25th, under Col. J. Thoring-ton, in Gracie's brigade, headquarters Bean's Station, Tenn. (946) July 31, 1863, assignment as above. First battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Holt; Second, Lieut.-Col. B. Hall, Jr.; Third, Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Major McLennan; headquarters, Cumberland Gap. (949) August 3d, three battalions from Cumberland Gap ordered to Strawberry Plains to report to General Gracie.

No. 42--(556) General Clanton says that at Chickamauga, the colors of the Second battalion were pierced by eighty-two balls, and President Davis promoted Lieu-tenant-Colonel Hall to colonel, and the color-bearer to a lieutenancy. Says the Legion is in Gracie's brigade, May, 1864.

No. 51--(16) September 19 and 20, 1863, in Gracie's brigade, Bragg's army. (416) Gen. William Preston in his report of Chickamauga says: "The brigade advanced with splendid courage, but was met by a destructive fire of the enemy from the cover of their fieldworks on the hill. The Second Alabama battalion stormed the hill and entered the intrenchments. Here an obstinate and bloody combat ensued. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall was severely wounded while gallantly leading his command in the assault on the hill. The Second battalion, out of 239, lost 169 killed and wounded. In the action its colors were pierced in 83 places, and were afterward, by request, presented to his Excellency, the President, who promoted the brave standard-bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, for conspicuous courage. George W. Norris, of Captain Wise's company, of Hall's battalion, fell at the foot of the enemy's flagstaff and was buried where he so nobly died." Lieutenant-Colonel Holt, of the First battalion, was severely wounded. (418) General Preston commends the gallantry of Lieutenant-Colonel Sanford, Major McLennan, Captain Walden and Surgeon Luckie. (421, 422) General Gracie's report: "The First battalion, Alabama Legion, sustained the heaviest loss. Of 239 carried into action, 169 were killed and wounded. Among the latter was Lieutenant-Colonel Holt, seriously, in the knee. Among the killed, Lieut. R. H. Bibb ....

It was the Second battalion that first gained the hill and placed its colors on the enemy's works. Its colors bear marks of over eighty bullets. Its bearer, Robert Y. Hiett, though thrice wounded and the staff thrice shot away, carried his charge throughout the entire fight. He deserves not only mention, but promotion. Lieuten-ant-Colonel Hall behaved most gallantly, receiving a severe wound in the thigh. Capt. W. D. Walden, Company B, was wounded in the breast, arm and shoulder, inside the enemy's works. His case deserves special mention. Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford, commanding the Third battalion, Alabama Legion, nobly did his duty, sustaining heavy loss both in officers and men. Asst. Surgeon James B. Luckie, both in the field and at the hospital, was most attentive to the wounded, as, indeed, were all the medical officers of the command. Major McLennan, commanding the Fourth Alabama Legion, nobly did his duty, sustaining heavy loss both in officers and men." General Gracie also says: "To Lieutenant Gilmer, adjutant of the Alabama Legion, who, during the absence of its commander has acted as my assistant inspector-general, and to Messrs. George C. Jones and J. S. Harwell, both wounded, my thanks are due for services rendered at Chickamauga." (423) Col. Y. M. Moody, Forty-third Alabama, says: "This (Second) battalion assisted in holding enemy's works at Chickamauga. . . On September 19th, the Third battalion, Alabama Legion, was left on top of a slight elevation, to support Jeffries' and Baxter's batteries. We remained at this point until the morning of the 20th, exposed during evening of the 19th to enemy's shells." (424, 425) Captain Huguley, of First battalion, says: "Colonel Holt was severely wounded early in the action, and the command devolved on me. We went into the engagement with 238, and had 24 killed and 144 wounded, 16 of whom were officers." (425, 426) Lieut. C. Hall says: "Lieuten-ant-Colonel Hall, while leading the command under the fiercest fire, was shot down at a time when by hard fighting we had almost reached the enemy's works. Captain Walden assumed command, and bravely led the still advancing line until shot down within the enemy's lines. Lieutenant Fisher, a brave officer of Company C, about this time was mortally wounded. The works were carried and the enemy driven before us in confusion. The battalion carried into action 230 aggregate; of these, 16 were killed, 75 wounded, many mortally." Commends bravery of Capt. L. H. Crumpler and Lieut. John H. Porter. (426, 427) Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford says: "We (Third battalion) carried into the fight on the 20th instant, 229 men. Of this number, 4 were killed and 42 wounded." He especially commends for courage and skill, Capt. John McCreless, Surgeon James B. Luckie, Corporal Hutto and Privates Hix, Turner and Tally of Company A; Sergeant Baygents and Privates Jackson, Brooks and Hall of Company B; Private Brown, Company C; Privates Hufham, Quillan and Jesse L. Jackson of Company D; Sergeant Harris and Privates Harris, Lewis, Skinner and Williams of Company E; Privates Simmons, Patrick and Jackson of Company F. (427, 428) Major McLennan of Fourth battalion commends conduct of Privates McCain, Holly, King, Head, of Company A; Corporal French and Privates Anderson, Flournoy, Smith, of Company B; Sergeant Mahone, Sergeant Daniels and Privates Daniel, Hill, Rutledge, Bennett, of Company D; Sergeant Stuckey, Corporal Martin, Corporal Curable and Privates Phillips and Lancey, of Company E, for conspicuous gallantry on the field.

Roll of honor, Chickamauga, First battalion: Adjt. John Massey, Private John H. Conner,(*) Company A; Private J. E. Wright, Company B; Private James M. Gibson, Company C; Private B. A. Davis,(*) Company D; Sergt. J. L. Cox,(*) Company E; Private A. J. Daw,(*) Company F. Second battalion: Capt. W. D. Walden, Company B; Private John H. Randall, Company A; First Sergt. Socrates Spigener, Company B; Private Benj. F. Temple,(*) Company C; Private William P. Jones, Company D; Private George W. Norris,(*) Company E; Corp. Jos. V. Castlebury,(*) Company F. Third battalion: Capt. John McCreless, Company E; Private Micajah Kirkland,(*) Company A; Private John Blanken-ship, Company C; Private Henry R. Lewis, Company C. Fourth battalion: Private Jackson Lee,(*) Company A; Corp. James E. French, Company B; Private B. F. Martin,(*) Company D; Private R. S. Turlington,(*) Company E.

No. 54--(452) November 30, 1863, Gracie's brigade, Gen. B. R. Johnson's forces. First battalion, Maj. D. S. Troy; Second, Capt. John H. Dillard; Third, Lieut.-Col. J. W. A. Sanford; Fourth, Maj. John D. McLennan. No. 55--(659) In Gracie's brigade, Buckner's division; detached November 22d, for operations against Burnside in east Tennessee.

No. 56--(891) December 31, 1863, Gracie's brigade, Longstreet's corps. Parts of First and Third (Sixtieth Alabama), under Colonel Sanford; Second and Fourth (Fifty-ninth Alabama), under Colonel Hall.
No. 78--(589) May, 1864, General Clanton speaks of Legion as in Gracie's brigade. Same mention as above, No. 42, p. 556.

(*) Killed in action.
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M. E. Wolf

Hello ME Wolf,

I read the interesting information you collected about Brigadier-General Archibald Gracie and his Alabama regiments including the Hilliard's Legion. I did not know much about Gracie and his excellent leadership. Thank you.

My 2nd g-grnadfather, Private Andrew J. Hancock, died early in Hilliard's leadership efforts. Andrew died in Chattanooga, TN, Aug. 1st 1862 about the time Hilliard's Legion was placed in McCown's brigade and before the siege of Cumberland Gap. I never have been able to pin-point a skirmish other than the Calvary was heavily used in the Chattanooga area. I have researched the EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS looking for hints and records as well. - I have been told that I should feel lucky to have the army record of his death date and place,.... but I am a curious person that keeps looking for more.

Thank you for your help and excellent finds about the Hilliards Legion.

JB Texas
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2014
Messages
1
#40
So cool. Just found this site. The photo of Charles Augustus Holladay is of my GG grandfather. I actually have the original daguerreotype of the photo. Would like to know where you got this image.
 


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