Help Please: Doc Bachelor 60th USCT Final Resting Place - died Christmas Day 1863 in Helena AR

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Am I missing something? From what I've seen no one bothered to record where they planted him at Helena, apparently marker doesn't survive if it ever had been marked.....

How then years later is he going to be moved to a National Cemetery if there is no record or where he even is? He would remain in the unknown orginal and apparently unmarked grave
 

Lubliner

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There should be some existing journal entries or reports from Benton Barracks in that time period. Maybe a doctor or an officer would write of burial events or maybe some Christian Charity Organization has a partnership with that area. It is possible some descriptions of events relevant to this issue could be found.
Lubliner.
 
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Two possibilities I would consider.....is either a racist detail just put him in a colored or slave cemetery and didn't bother to mark or record it.....the hospital and corpsmen might not have been USCT

Or they put him in a white local cemetery to offend the locals, and succeeded and they removed the marker.

One can only guess how many contrabands went unmarked as well
 

Lubliner

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Two possibilities I would consider.....is either a racist detail just put him in a colored or slave cemetery and didn't bother to mark or record it.....the hospital and corpsmen might not have been USCT

Or they put him in a white local cemetery to offend the locals, and succeeded and they removed the marker.
I would think his own messmates possibly buried him. Maybe a white officer was put in charge, but surely more men died in the vicinity. Locate some of them and possibly...
Lubliner.
 

lelliott19

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Carded records show he died in company quarters. His original burial would have been at Helena AR near where his unit was encamped. Like @Lubliner said, at least some other soldiers probably died while they were encamped there too and a place nearby would have been selected for interring the dead.

Under those circumstances, none (or very few) burials would have been permanently marked at that time - it's not like they could get stone grave markers shipped in during the middle of the war. Supplies, men, ammunition, etc. all would have taken priority over making and shipping grave markers. If the dead got a wooden headboard, they were lucky.

If the burials were known, and if they were located during the removal of remains to a National cemetery years later, then those who had a wooden headboard and whose identity was still legible were reinterred with engraved permanent grave markers. Those who had no headboard or whose identity was no longer legible, were reinterred as unknowns.

Those whose graves were not located were left where they were originally buried. Like @DixieRifles said, the effort was extensive but it is possible that some burials were not known or found. It seems logical that large groups of burials at hospital sites would have been known and found --- but a small group of burials near an encampment site might not have been known and could easily have been overlooked.
 
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Carded records show he died in company quarters. His original burial would have been at Helena AR near where his unit was encamped. Like @Lubliner said, at least some other soldiers probably died while they were encamped there too and a place nearby would have been selected for interring the dead.

Under those circumstances, none (or very few) burials would have been permanently marked at that time - it's not like they could get stone grave markers shipped in during the middle of the war. Supplies, men, ammunition, etc. all would have taken priority over making and shipping grave markers. If the dead got a wooden headboard, they were lucky.

If the burials were known, and if they were located during the removal of remains to a National cemetery years later, then those who had a wooden headboard and whose identity was still legible were reinterred with engraved permanent grave markers. Those who had no headboard or whose identity was no longer legible, were reinterred as unknowns.

Those whose graves were not located were left where they were originally buried. Like @DixieRifles said, the effort was extensive but it is possible that some burials were not known or found. It seems logical that large groups of burials at hospital sites would have been known and found --- but a small group of burials near an encampment site might not have been known and could easily have been overlooked.
So they didn't bother to record the burial.....though it still seems strange they wouldn't have used a city cemetery, thought I had seen instances of garrisons doing that here.......I know of one instance of em buried in family cemetery, but was from a skirmish fought nearby
 

DixieRifles

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Those whose graves were not located were left where they were originally buried. Like @DixieRifles said, the effort was extensive but it is possible that some burials were not known or found.
I didn't say that but I get the point. I didn't think his grave would have been lost BUT that was one of the main purposes of creating the National Cemeteries, i.e., to gather all the individual graves into a larger and protected cemetery.

Even if his grave was found, his identity could have been lost. I think it was on our tour of Corinth & Shiloh, we were told about a group of graves who were moved. They dug them up and marked the caskets. When they reached the new location, there was a rain storm and it washed away all the names from the caskets---which were written in chalk.
 

lelliott19

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There were only a few Batchelor households in Haywood County, TN at the time of the 1850 and 1860 US Census -- all of the heads of household were white. If Doc was black and was born in Haywood County, TN, it is probable that he was enslaved. At the time of the 1860 US census in Haywood County, there were 46 enslaved people enumerated in Batchelor/Bachelor households and 4 free persons recorded as mulatto.

1850 Batchelor /Bachelor Households Haywood, TN
Alex Batchelor
John A Batchelor
James W Batchelor

And in 1860, we find these Batchelors as heads of household in Haywood County:

Alex Batchelor age 78 b. 1782 in NC with wife Ruth b.1789 in TN and brother John age 76 b. 1784 in NC (John is noted as blind) In 1860, Alex was recorded as the owner of 15 enslaved persons and John as owner of 5 enslaved persons.

Thomas W Batchelor b. 1812 in GA with wife Mariah and six children viz James AG, John HH, Charles S, Ruth A, Thomas W and Dolly M Batchelor. In 1860, Thomas was recorded as the owner of 9 enslaved persons.

James W Batchelor age 28 b. 1832 in GA with wife Catherine Batchelor age 18 b. 1842 in MS, along with Caroline Beatty, age 59 b. 1801 in SC (possibly his mother in law) and John Beatty age 21 b. 1839 in GA working as his overseer (possibly his brotherinlaw) In 1860, James W was recorded as the owner of 3 enslaved persons.

John AM Batchelor (age 31 b. 1829 in GA) Living in the same household: Francis Beaty (M age 27 b. 1833 in GA), Thomas Midyett (M age 15 b. 1845 in TN) and four free mulatto persons - Camire Nash (F age 25 b. 1835 in GA) Ashburn Nash (M age 12 b. 1848 in TN) Mary Nash (F age 8 b.1852 in TN) and Henry Nash (M age 5 b. 1855 in TN) In 1860, John AM was recorded as the owner of 14 enslaved persons.

These are the only households recorded in 1860 under the last name Batchelor or Bachelor. It's important to note that only free blacks would have been included by name on the 1860 US Census so the four mulatto persons living in the household of John AM Batchelor were not enslaved. Still, none of them are the right age to be "Doc Bachelor." Enslaved people were "counted" on a "Slave Schedule" under the owner's name, however their names were not recorded - -- just their sex, race, and age.
1606876868836.png

Interestingly, in November 1861, we find the Last Will and Testament of John Batchelor who leaves the enslaved of his estate to his brother Alexander Batchelor or to remain in the possession of Alex's children.

At the time, John was the owner of 5 enslaved people, which he names in his will -- and Alex was the owner of at least 15. John was age 77 (b. 1784 in NC.) and his brother, to whom the enslaved people were to go, was 79 years old. Alex died the next year --- in December 1862.
1606879982296.png

Direct link to the will at Family Search

This part of the will says:
5th. It is my wish and request that in the division of my estate, my negro woman Mary [b. 1836 age 25*] & her children Wiley [b. 1854 age 7*] Elizabeth [b. 1856 age 5*] and Cally [b. 1859 age 2*] remain in the Batchelor family or connexion, that is with Alexander Batchelor or some of his children, and that my negro man Noah [b. 1836 age 25*] be kept in the Curlin family, and if the family of Curlin cannot manage to keep him among them, then the executor is to sell for cash & apply the proceeds....

*The ages of the enslaved people listed in the Last Will and Testament of John Batchelor are taken from the US census 1860 "Slave Schedule" plus I added a year for 1861.

I'm not suggesting that Noah is the same man as Doc. It's just interesting that both Alex and John Batchelor who are recorded together as the owners of 20 enslaved people died within about 13 months of each other. Mary is found on the 1870 US census in Haywood county with two of the named children - Elizabeth and Callie -- so she didn't leave the area. It is certainly possible that Doc and other enslaved people left Haywood County prior to 1863 and traveled to other places seeking their freedom.
1606881283269.png

Whether Doc traveled as far as Iowa is I think the question.
 
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lelliott19

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I didn't think his grave would have been lost BUT that was one of the main purposes of creating the National Cemeteries, i.e., to gather all the individual graves into a larger and protected cemetery.
You might be interested in reading this thread I posted a while back. This USCT soldier was treated at the "Contraband Hospital" in Memphis. It is unknown whether those USCT soldiers remains were ever gathered during the process of collecting and reinterring in National Cemeteries. Why a USCT soldier who was ill was treated at the "Contraband Hospital" and not at a US Hospital is a bigger question.
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/us...l-hospital-at-memphis-tn.160788/#post-2102665
 
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There were only a few Batchelor households in Haywood County, TN at the time of the 1850 and 1860 US Census -- all of the heads of household were white. If Doc was black and was born in Haywood County, TN, it is probable that he was enslaved.

1850 Batchelor /Bachelor Households Haywood, TN
Alex Batchelor
John A Batchelor
James W Batchelor

And in 1860, we find these Batchelors as heads of household in Haywood County:

Alex Batchelor age 78 b. 1782 in NC with wife Ruth b.1789 in TN and brother John age 76 b. 1784 in NC (John is noted as blind) In 1860, Alex was recorded as the owner of 15 enslaved persons and John as owner of 5 enslaved persons.

Thomas W Batchelor b. 1812 in GA with wife Mariah and six children viz James AG, John HH, Charles S, Ruth A, Thomas W and Dolly M Batchelor. In 1860, Thomas was recorded as the owner of 9 enslaved persons.

James W Batchelor age 28 b. 1832 in GA with wife Catherine Batchelor age 18 b. 1842 in MS, along with Caroline Beatty, age 59 b. 1801 in SC (possibly his mother in law) and John Beatty age 21 b. 1839 in GA working as his overseer (possibly his brotherinlaw) In 1860, James W was recorded as the owner of 3 enslaved persons.

John AM Batchelor (age 31 b. 1829 in GA) Living in the same household: Francis Beaty (M age 27 b. 1833 in GA), Thomas Midyett (M age 15 b. 1845 in TN) and four free mulatto persons - Camire Nash (F age 25 b. 1835 in GA) Ashburn Nash (M age 12 b. 1848 in TN) Mary Nash (F age 8 b.1852 in TN) and Henry Nash (M age 5 b. 1855 in TN) In 1860, John AM was recorded as the owner of 14 enslaved persons.

These are the only households recorded in 1860 under the last name Batchelor or Bachelor. It's important to note that only free blacks would have been included by name on the 1860 US Census so the four mulatto persons living in the household of John AM Batchelor were not enslaved. Still, none of them are the right age to be "Doc Bachelor." Enslaved people were "counted" on a "Slave Schedule" under the owner's name, however their names were not recorded - -- just their sex, race, and age.
View attachment 383079
Interestingly, in November 1861, we find the Last Will and Testament of John Batchelor who leaves the enslaved of his estate to his brother Alexander Batchelor or to remain in the possession of Alex's children.

At the time, John was the owner of 5 enslaved people, which he names in his will -- and Alex was the owner of at least 15. John was age 77 (b. 1784 in NC.) and his brother, to whom the enslaved people were to go, was 79 years old. Alex died the next year --- in December 1862.
View attachment 383080
Direct link to the will at Family Search

This part of the will says:
5th. It is my wish and request that in the division of my estate, my negro woman Mary [b. 1836 age 25*] & her children Wiley [b. 1854 age 7*] Elizabeth [b. 1856 age 5*] and Cally [b. 1859 age 2*] remain in the Batchelor family or connexion, that is with Alexander Batchelor or some of his children, and that my negro man Noah [b. 1836 age 25*] be kept in the Curlin family, and if the family of Curlin cannot manage to keep him among them, then the executor is to sell for cash & apply the proceeds....

*The ages of the enslaved people listed in the Last Will and Testament of John Batchelor are taken from the US census 1860 "Slave Schedule" plus I added a year for 1861.

I'm not suggesting that Noah is the same man as Doc. It's just interesting that both Alex and John Batchelor who are recorded together as the owners of 20 enslaved people died within about 13 months of each other. Mary is found on the 1870 US census in Haywood county with two of the named children - Elizabeth and Callie -- so she didn't leave the area. It is certainly possible that Doc and other enslaved people left Haywood County prior to 1863 and traveled to other places seeking their freedom.
View attachment 383084
Whether Doc traveled as far as Iowa is I think the question.
In your post 11 in the thread, in 2nd photo doesn't remarks say former slave? The first word is stylized cursive, the 2nd word slave is pretty clear though.
 

Biscoitos

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Thanks. I should have thought of that but I assume he would remain in the same State---but why would a Yankee care which Southern state he was buried in.
I searched Find-A-Grave for Bachelor, or any version spelled with "Batch...." and found no match.
Where did you get the idea that he could choose where he was buried? The US Army decided that for him.
 

DixieRifles

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Alex Batchelor age 78 b. 1782 in NC with wife Ruth b.1789 in TN and brother John age 76 b. 1784 in NC (John is noted as blind) In 1860, Alex was recorded as the owner of 15 enslaved persons and John as owner of 5 enslaved persons.
Someone posted to the FOLD3 inquiry the following. As with many comments, it may not be accurate.

"The Slave Schedule of 1850 shows an owner named Alex Bachelor (68) in Haywood, TN. Several slaves listed with at least 3 that would be in Doc's age range. Alex is still farming over 1700 acres in the same location in 1860. The slave schedule list does not show anyone that would fit Doc's age. Name also spelled as Batchelor in some places."
 
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Carded records show he died in company quarters. His original burial would have been at Helena AR near where his unit was encamped. Like @Lubliner said, at least some other soldiers probably died while they were encamped there too and a place nearby would have been selected for interring the dead.

Under those circumstances, none (or very few) burials would have been permanently marked at that time - it's not like they could get stone grave markers shipped in during the middle of the war. Supplies, men, ammunition, etc. all would have taken priority over making and shipping grave markers. If the dead got a wooden headboard, they were lucky.

If the burials were known, and if they were located during the removal of remains to a National cemetery years later, then those who had a wooden headboard and whose identity was still legible were reinterred with engraved permanent grave markers. Those who had no headboard or whose identity was no longer legible, were reinterred as unknowns.

Those whose graves were not located were left where they were originally buried. Like @DixieRifles said, the effort was extensive but it is possible that some burials were not known or found. It seems logical that large groups of burials at hospital sites would have been known and found --- but a small group of burials near an encampment site might not have been known and could easily have been overlooked.
One can easily imagine an occupying force putting up markers to colored troops which would also probably have been offensive to the occupied, could easily have lead to mischief to any such marker.......sadly one encounters such grave disturbance shenanigans by Union troops here during the war. If wood markers had been used.
 
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