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Help please - 1855 Harlan & Hollingsworth Hull #35

Discussion in 'Civil War History - The Naval War' started by lelliott19, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Looking for help with information about CSS Logan. (Thanks in advance to anyone who can provide any info.)

    Apparently, she was built in 1855 by Harlan & Hollingsworth as Hull #35 at Wilmington Delaware. She was an iron hulled, sidewheel steamer. Her first home port was Camden, New Jersey. She was 514 (or alternately reported 296) tons. She was 160 feet in length, 26 feet in breadth, and 7 feet in depth.

    The Logan was chartered by the State of Virginia in 1861 and served as a transport, mainly in Virginia rivers. On May 6, 1862, CSS Logan was burned at Barrett’s Landing, in the Pamunkey River, 25 miles above White House, Virginia. She was destroyed by the Confederates on the approach of the USS Currituck and USS Seth Low, to keep her from falling into the hands of the Federals. http://shipwrecks.com/shipwrecks-of-may-6/

    So three questions for the naval experts and @Mark F. Jenkins @AndyHall @67th Tigers @rebelatsea
    1. Would she have been re-named to Logan from some other name when she was produced?
    2. Would one of the boats on this list possibly be the Logan?
    3. How do we know which ones were sidewheel steamers? What do those letters mean in the 1st column labeled "Rig."
    Harlan & Hollingsworth.JPG

    https://books.google.com/books?id=Clk_AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA219&lpg=PA219&dq="Harlan+&+Hollingsworth"+1855&source=bl&ots=eBVktxUyqV&sig=-2KQ9_FoO7ZZhXfA5K1z2ElcagY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi9_6vsif3QAhUFNiYKHczsBvkQ6AEIKzAF#v=onepage&q="Harlan & Hollingsworth" 1855&f=false
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016

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  3. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Shoot! :nah disagree: I thought the Logan might have originally been the Sophia (listed on that page above as 286 tons produced in 1855 by Harlan & Hollingsworth.) But apparently not. :nah disagree:Seems the Sophia was renamed Hattie and sank in Appalachicola Bay FL with a full cargo of cotton Nov 1866. Though the cargo was damaged, it was reportedly salvaged. *

    Do you guys see any other candidates on that list?
    Thanks!
    Laura

    * Source: https://books.google.com/books?id=6...IJjAC#v=onepage&q=Sophia steamer 1855&f=false
     
  4. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    The info on Logan at the top of the OP matches what I have from the Lytle-Holdcamper list. She was apparently launched under that name in 1855. Harlan & Hollingsworth were one of the more prominent iron shipbuilders in the United States leading up to the CW, and built a large number of vessels for the Southern Steamship Company (the Morgan Line), although Logan was not one of these.

    In the list you show, I believe St.p. indicates a steam vessel driven by paddlewheels (almost all sidewheeels), while St.s. indicates a screw (propeller) vessel.

    ETA: There is a mention in the Trenton (NJ) State Gazette of June 11, 1856 of an accident to the steamer Edwin Forrest, that says "the new steamer Logan is running in her stead," that seems to be the same vessel.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
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  5. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Philadelphia Daily Pennsylvanian, 27 June 1856, p4:

    Philadelphia Daily Pennsylvanian 27 June 1856 p4.jpg

    Bombay Hook is a spot near the head of Delaware Bay, about 45 miles below Philadelphia by water.
     
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  6. Mike Serpa

    Mike Serpa Captain

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  7. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
  8. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Richard Stockton was a somewhat larger vessel (651 registered tons v Logan's 296 registered tons), but maybe similar in general appearance. I did see a news item of Logan operating as an excursion steamer, so the big open foredeck would be correct for a short-haul vessel.
     
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  9. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Richard Stockton is of a configuration used in the Northeast, for coastal trade and on rivers like the Hudson. The boilers are set wide apart, out on the sponsons, which is why the chimneys are way out on either side than closer to the centerline. I don't know enough about Logan to be sure she was of this type, although certainly could have been.
     
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  10. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Another of Richard Stockton, by Samuel Ward Stanton:

    Stoickton.jpg
     
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  11. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Apparently, the Logan was captured prior to July 1861?

    "The steamer Logan of the Baltimore and Fredericksburg line, and the steamer Virginia, were already (by July 4, 1861) in the possession of the Confederates; the steamer William Selden, of the Baltimore Steam Packet Company, was being used by the Confederates in Norfolk harbor. These captures had made the Union authorities more vigilant and suspicious."
    https://books.google.com/books?id=H...SYKHRWjDu4Q6AEIHDAB#v=onepage&q=Logan&f=false
     
  12. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    I don't know about Logan in Virginia specifically, but in the Deep South the local (Confederate) authorities used all sorts of pretexts to seize northern-owned merchant shipping lying then in southern ports, especially if they seemed useful to the war effort. The South had very limited shipbuilding capacity, and many of the ships that served southern ports were largely (or wholly) owned in the North, so they could be grabbed without ruffling too many feathers in Montgomery, Columbia, or Baton Rouge.

    Logan was running between Baltimore and Fredericksburg at the time.

    Baltimore, Maryland South newspaper, April 27, 1861, p. 1

    Logan 02.png

    These adverts appear as late as July 3, 1861.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
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  13. Bil R

    Bil R Private

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    Hello Elliott,

    The Delaware newspapers are rather sparse in their descriptions of locally built vessels in 1855. It appears from RG 41 that the first permanent SRE was No. 62 Camden, NJ issued on 24 October 1855. Following typical building times this would suggest the Logan was launched in the July - August 1855 period and had probably been laid down in the late winter or early spring.

    From the 'Semi-Centennial Memoir of the Harlan & Hollingsworth Co., Wilmington, Delaware 1836-1886' part 2, page 378 we find the Logan listed:

    35 - Steamboat Logan for William Whilldin and Others 1855 514 tons 160' x 26' x 7'6" two HP engines 30" x 10' stroke

    In the remarks column it states - 'from steamboat Commodore Stockton'

    This suggests she was powered by two used HP engines removed from the ferryboat Commodore Stockton (217 tons, built 1846 Philadelphia). This Stockton is listed as 'abandoned in 1854' whereas the 1850 Stockton (435 tons Philadelphia) was listed as 'sold foreign' in 1852. With a shallow draft and HP engines I would give her more of a western river packet configuration, a type which H & H did build.

    All the best,
    Bil
     
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  14. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Thanks @AndyHall and @Bil R I really appreciate your help.

    Bil would you please elaborate on the meaning of "HP engines" and the "30" x 10' stroke" part?

    Also - what is RG 41 and SRE No. 62?
    Sorry - :nah disagree: I am pretty much clueless about ships of the period - but eager to learn. :wavespin:
    Thanks so much!
    Laura
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
  15. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Logan seems to have been effectively in Confederate hands by early July. In June she was used to carry some prisoners from the Battle of Big Bethel from Yorktown to West Point, from which they traveled by rail to Richmond.
     
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  16. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    "two HP engines 30" x 10' stroke"

    Those dimensions don't sound like a high-pressure engine to me, compared to the HP engines on the Western Rivers (124-140 lbs. pressure).

    Logan's two engines would have been a pair, each similar in configuration to this single engine, although a little smaller.

    Walking Beam Engine.jpg
     
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  17. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Maybe the Logan wasnt captured.....

    "On the York River, authorities hired the schooner David Vannam to transport ordnance to erect batteries at Wets Point. For $2,000 a month the state leased the steamer Logan from the Baltimore and Fredericksburg Steamboat Company, but did not fit her out as a warship*."

    *sourced to "ORN, series I, vol 5, 809; Robertson, Proceedings, 147."
    https://books.google.com/books?id=dMVLApt9dgkC&pg=PA74&lpg=PA74&dq=1861+Steamboat+Logan+Baltimore+Fredericksburg&source=bl&ots=aZJ-hQ2qeN&sig=ii66NH2v9kAA0xVv5YBy7nrJ81A&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA5ZKBpf_QAhWLOyYKHVWhA2AQ6AEIGjAA#v=onepage&q=1861 Steamboat Logan Baltimore Fredericksburg&f=false

    EDIT: And then there's this New York Times article that says the Logan and her crew were impressed:
    .....a free black man named William Ringgold. Ringgold’s story began on April 23, 1861, less than two weeks after the firing on Fort Sumter, when the steamship Logan left Baltimore for Fredericksburg, Va. Ringgold, working as a steward, was aboard. As soon as the ship reached its goal, Ringgold, the Logan and its crew were impressed into service by Virginia
    http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/category/disunion/page/57/?ref=travel&_r=0
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
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  18. Bil R

    Bil R Private

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    Hello Laura,

    To clarify some abbreviations, 'HP' refers to 'high pressure' as during that period steam engines were powered by either high pressure or low pressure steam. Depending upon the type of steam a ship's arrangement of machinery could be quite different. And that would affect her appearance, form and function.

    The measures 30" x 10' refer to the actual engine cylinder size. Each engine would have a diameter of 30 inches and a stroke of 10 feet. By definition this means that the engine cylinder was a least 10 feet long.

    The abbreviation 'RG 41' refer to National Archives Record Group 41 which are Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation records. Within those records are 'SRE's or Ship Registers and Enrollments. Just like your car has a license and registration all merchant vessels US owned and operated have a registration. One copy stays in the port of registry, one stays with the vessel and one goes to Washington. That document contains hull measures, place and year of construction, brief description and ownership. 'No. 62' means that the Logan was the 62nd vessel listed and registered in Camden, NJ for the year 1855.

    All the best,
    Bil
     
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  19. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Thank you soooooo much @Bil R . I'm sorry... I really know nothing about ships.

    I'm just an infantry girl :D currently working on a history of the 16th Georgia. The regiment was transported aboard the Logan on Oct 19, 1861 as part of their journey from Richmond to Yorktown. I really appreciate you and @AndyHall helping me out with this one.

    Wow! A 30 inch x 10' cylinder? That's a whole lot bigger than the ones in my Honda! So it had two single piston engines? Im guessing it wasnt dual overhead cam? :nah disagree:
     
  20. AndyHall

    AndyHall Colonel Forum Host

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    Dual overhead walking beam.

    :frantic:
     
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  21. lelliott19

    lelliott19 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Whooooooaaaaa! No way!?!?! How much smaller? scale wise? compared to the men? What part of that cylinder is the actual measured/functioning part of the cylinder? Just the big part or all of it? Maybe I need a labeled version. :bounce:
     

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