Help Identifying Spencer Carbine

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Two reasons: There were occasions where the caliber of an older arm was changed. Ex. thousands of .58 caliber Springfield muskets were left after the Civil War. They were converted to a Trapdoor at .50 caliber The bore would be drilled out if needed and a sleeve of the new caliber would be installed inside the original barrel along with the Trapdoor. Another was once the rifling (grooves) inside the barrel wore down it became a shotgun and the bullet would not be spinning when fired through the barrel and accuracy would be lost.
 

ucvrelics

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Please explain - what does it mean "the barrel has been sleeved?" or not?

Welcome from New Hampshire and to the Soldier's Tales Forum, btw! The artillery guys are full of knowledge!
What @JOHN42768 said. In the case of the Spencer they went to a different size bullet with the model 1865 so they converted some of them with a sleeve in order to fire the new round.
 
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Jobe Holiday

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The Spencer Carbine shown here is a M-1860. The measurement of 22", from the front of the barrel to the very end of the barrel, is the absolute indicator. The barrel is sleeved, or lined, whichever you prefer. You cah clearly see the yellow brazing around the circumference of the liner. The bore is 3 Lands, and 3 Grooves, which is correct and another indicator of a re-worked M-1860 Spencer Carbine along with the Stable Cut-off being added at the same time. The caliber is now .56-50, having been altered from the original of .56-56 caliber.
J.
 

Seduzal

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Thanks for sharing this awesome gun. And
Welcome to CWT from the Smoky Mountain side of North Carolina. Just jump right in and enjoy.
 
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Jsharp67

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For the record, and if you read the post I was talking about the M-1 Garand rifles that I own. Both are from the CMP, inspected, servicable and safe to shoot. I would never fire any of the antique Civil War rifles that I own. No need to show yourself out.
 

Story

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For the record, and if you read the post I was talking about the M-1 Garand rifles that I own. Both are from the CMP, inspected, servicable and safe to shoot. I would never fire any of the antique Civil War rifles that I own.
I read what you wrote about the Garands, hence the quote.

Not sure why you're reticent about shooting something that's in good shape - if you check the stickied post at the top of this forum, there's an entire sport (North South Skirmish Association) that's dedicated to competition with original weapons.

No need to show yourself out.
That was a joke.
 
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