Help Identifying M1850 Weyersberg Sword - Real or Fake?

Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
2
#1
I bought this sword at an estate sale. After what research I could find (new to this), it appears to be a Weyersberg (German) 32" blade with the officers Hilt. The acid etch is non descript foliate, with no mention of a US company or other US markings. The scabbard is heavy and also lacking any markings.The blade is also is marked on the edge "IRON PROOF".

Hoping it is a period piece, perhaps assembled after the war or before and not a fake.... any help would be appreciated.

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Glen_C

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Apr 27, 2010
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Nipmuc USA
#2
A nice piece and authentic, as far as I am concerned. This is a Staff&Field pattern and may well predate the ACW. While it is true there is no retailer, or even etch of E Pluribus, I would not deny it to be a period sword. While the tang does look like it has been pounded some, the fibre blade bumper is still intact. Weyersburg was typically the blade source, with various furbishers mounting blades. While we might look at this generic as lacking, an intact S&F with a scabbard is a nice find. As it reads Iron Proof vs Eisenhauer, that (to me) also dates it to earlier than say, a post war sword.

Cheers
GC
 
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
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2,754
#8
A nice piece and authentic, as far as I am concerned. This is a Staff&Field pattern and may well predate the ACW. While it is true there is no retailer, or even etch of E Pluribus, I would not deny it to be a period sword. While the tang does look like it has been pounded some, the fibre blade bumper is still intact. Weyersburg was typically the blade source, with various furbishers mounting blades. While we might look at this generic as lacking, an intact S&F with a scabbard is a nice find. As it reads Iron Proof vs Eisenhauer, that (to me) also dates it to earlier than say, a post war sword.

Cheers
GC
Weren't Iron Proof and Eisenhauer interchangeable?
 

ucvrelics

Captain
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May 7, 2016
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#12
Welcome From The Heart Of Dixie. Nice piece and right as rain. One question, is the Iron Proof stamped or etched? Several companies imported blade from Weyersberg to assembly swords during the CW. Horstmann and Collins come to mind.
 
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
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#13
It's amazing what I can learn by clicking in on other people's collectibles. I think it's a great looking saber, and I'm glad to see others believe it's authentic. I'd sure be proud of it if I owned it. Welcome from Missouri!
I appreciate the people here who take the time to educate people like me who have limited knowledge and limited time to learn that knowledge . So "Thank you all" !!
 
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Jul 28, 2015
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#15
I picked up on the Iron Proof vs Eisenhauer, thinking that you mean Iron Proof is earlier?

I had picked up an Eisenhauer marked sword some time ago and have wondered about it.
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2019
Messages
2
#18
Welcome From The Heart Of Dixie. Nice piece and right as rain. One question, is the Iron Proof stamped or etched? Several companies imported blade from Weyersberg to assembly swords during the CW. Horstmann and Collins come to mind.
Thanks for all the info!!!! This was has Iron Proof etched.
 
Joined
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#19
I agree, this is a totally righteous example. Although unmarked, I believe it is probably an early, perhaps even pre-CW, W.H. Horstmann product using a Weyersberg blade. I base this on a number of small stylistic features. Early Horstmann blades frequently used generic etching similar to what I see here. The pommel also has oak leaf decoration, which is normal for Horstmann swords; most other makers tended to use laurel leaves.
 

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