Edged Wpns Help identify a enfield bayonet

kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
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Hello all I need help identifying this enfield bayonet. I bought this back in 1987 for my reproduction enfield for re-enacting. The only mark I can find on it so far is an X barely visible in the photo. It is pitted and may cover light markings, any idea of the X and where to look for other markings?
 

OldSarge79

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Location
Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
Can you post more photos and dimensions? One photo like that doesn't give much to go on.

Having said that, from what little I can see, it could be a British Pattern 1845 Extra Service Bayonet. They were stamped with an "EX" in that approximate location, and the shape of the base of the blade is the same. Do you see the remnants of an "E" just before the "X" by chance?
 

kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
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More pictures possibly a small square stamp under the X. It is 20” 1/4 inches long. It fits on my repro enfield really good might be why I picked it.
 

kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
Hey Sarge thanks for the help, you know funny thing I could not see that Salter until I took a picture of the bayonet up close and then zoomed in on it.
 

kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
I found this online referencing the X on the top: “On the rear of the socket itself, there is stamped an X, this is likely to be a bending mark, proof of blade. This was stamped on when the blade had been tested against easily bending.”
 

OldSarge79

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Location
Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
I found this online referencing the X on the top: “On the rear of the socket itself, there is stamped an X, this is likely to be a bending mark, proof of blade. This was stamped on when the blade had been tested against easily bending.”
That's a new one on me. I have eleven British bayonets, none with an X, and I have inspected many more over the years. Don't recall ever seeing one or reading about that happening.
Having said all that, I'm sure someone stamped it on the blade for some reason, whatever that might be, and there are probably others like it out there.
 

Craig L Barry

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jan 5, 2010
Location
Murfreesboro, TN
There is a chapter on bayonets from Geo Salter in Suppliers to the CS, which is a bit too long for an internet forum post, but here is a blurb about the firm from College Hill Arsenal (Tim Prince):

"George Salter & Company was a Birmingham manufacturer of spring steel and balances (scales) that was started in 1760 by Richard & William Salter. Upon their deaths John & George Salter took over the business and by the 1790s they had become one of the leading employers in West Bromwich (about 5 miles NW of Birmingham), continuing to manufacture springs and balances, and adding bayonets to their manufacturing capacity. For the next 200 years the company continued in business under the name of George Slater, and during the late 18th​ Century and 19th​ Century they were one of the premier bayonet makers to produce bayonets for the British Board of Ordnance (later War Department), as well as the commercial and export trade – especially to the North & South during the course of the American Civil War. During the latter part of the 19th Century, Salter returned to their original specialty and continued to expand their spring steel, spring and weighing and balance business. Salter actually continues to do business today as a subsidiary of Avery Weigh-Tronix, who acquired Salter in 2000."​
 
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kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
That's a new one on me. I have eleven British bayonets, none with an X, and I have inspected many more over the years. Don't recall ever seeing one or reading about that happening.
Having said all that, I'm sure someone stamped it on the blade for some reason, whatever that might be, and there are probably others like it out there.
Well mine is now worth $1,300 because of the rarity!
 

kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
There is a chapter on bayonets from Geo Salter in Suppliers to the CS, which is a bit too long for an internet forum post, but here is a blurb about the frim from College Hill Arsenal (Tim Prince):

"George Salter & Company was a Birmingham manufacturer of spring steel and balances (scales) that was started in 1760 by Richard & William Salter. Upon their deaths John & George Salter took over the business and by the 1790s they had become one of the leading employers in West Bromwich (about 5 miles NW of Birmingham), continuing to manufacture springs and balances, and adding bayonets to their manufacturing capacity. For the next 200 years the company continued in business under the name of George Slater, and during the late 18th​ Century and 19th​ Century they were one of the premier bayonet makers to produce bayonets for the British Board of Ordnance (later War Department), as well as the commercial and export trade – especially to the North & South during the course of the American Civil War. During the latter part of the 19th Century, Salter returned to their original specialty and continued to expand their spring steel, spring and weighing and balance business. Salter actually continues to do business today as a subsidiary of Avery Weigh-Tronix, who acquired Salter in 2000."​
So what is a way to see if these salter bayonets are CS supplied? Is there marks I am missing other than the mating numbers to a rifle?
 

OldSarge79

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Location
Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
Well mine is now worth $1,300 because of the rarity!
I'm not sure what rarity you are referring to, but they are not rare. There are no Confederate marks that I can see, although it may very well have been imported for the Civil War. Which side imported it, however, is entirely up to speculation.

But you're right, if there were large numbers hand-engraved on the socket, that would be a strong indication of Confederate purchase.
 
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kafer1964

Cadet
Joined
May 27, 2021
I'm not sure what rarity you are referring to, but they are not rare. There are no Confederate marks that I can see, although it may very well have been imported for the Civil War. Which side imported it, however, is entirely up to speculation.

But you're right, if there were large numbers hand-engraved on the socket, that would be a strong indication of Confederate purchase.
Hey Sarge it was a joke just claiming it rare. I am just relieved it is not a Nepalese knock off. I just remember buying it in 88 because it closely fit my repro Tower.
 
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