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Eighteenth South Carolina Infantry



2nd Manassas, VA after action report:

No. 161.

Reports of Col. W. H. Wallace, Eighteenth South Carolina Infantry, of
operations August 23-30.

CAMP NEAR WINCHESTER, VA.,
October 17, 1862.
In obedience to orders form brigade headquarters I would respectfully report
that the Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers, on the morning of July
[August] 23, in obedience to orders from Brig.-Gen. Evans, was
marched to a point on the Rappahannock River near Rappahannock Station,
and was formed in line of battle and marched to the base of a hill, upon the
summit of which a battery was in position, which immediately engaged a
battery of the enemy posted upon a hill nearly on front of the railroad bridge
crossing the Rappahannock at that point. The Eighteenth, in its present
position, was intended as a support for the battery in our front in the event
of its being charged by the enemy. We remained in this position for a
considerable length of time, and were subjected to a rather severe fire from
the enemy's guns and sustained some damage. We were then moved in line
of battle, by order of Gen. Evans, up the hill and halted near the summit,
still under a heavy fire. Here we remained but a short time and were
marched by the right flank toward the position of the enemy, and while
passing over the ground necessary to be traversed to reach the hill upon
which the enemy was posted we were exposed to a very severe fire of shell,
from which our loss was considerable. We reached the base of this hill just
as a charge was being made upon it by other troops. This charge was
repulsed by batteries of the enemy on the opposite side of the river, to which
side what troops of the enemy that were on this side soon retired and burned
the bridge behind them. While occupying the position at the base of the hill
upon which the enemy had been posted a battery of the enemy was put in
position on
the opposite side of the river that enfiladed us from the left flank and opened
fire upon us. As the battery was entirely our of our reach its position
enforced a change of our position, which was immediately accomplished by
moving by the right flank around the hill to the right side of it.

At this stage in the progress of the contest, it being impossible to employ
infantry successfully (the enemy being all beyond the river), and as in our
new position we were exposed to a flank fire from a battery on our right,
under orders from Gen. Evans the regiment retired under a very heavy
fire out of view of the enemy.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. WALLACE,
Col. Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers.

Capt. [A. L.] EVANS.

-----

CAMP NEAR WINCHESTER, VA.,
October 21, 1862.
CAPTAIN: In obedience to instructions from brigade headquarters I have the
honor to report:

On Friday, August 29, the Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers, under the
command of Col. J. M. Gadberry, and constituting a part of Gen. Evans'
brigade, arrived near the famous battle-field of Manassas. At the time of the
arrival of the regiment a battle was in progress between Confederate forces
and the enemy. The Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers was halted in the
road just out of the range of the shot and shell of the enemy. In a short time
it was marched to the right of the road in the fields and advanced into a body
of woods that was occupied at the time by Hodd's brigade, the battle all the
while raging in our front. Pausing a moment in these woods, we went by a
flank across the road we had left and upon the edge of the open found that
was the theater of conflict. Having cleared the road, which was being shelled
by the enemy, we marched to the front in line of battle and entered the open
battle ground, and advanced at double-quick time toward the position of the
enemy. Having advanced half way across the open ground and finding no
enemy, we crossed the road to the right again in the direction of heavy
firing. Immediately after crossing, and our front enemy, we received a sharp
volley of musketry from a heavy body of the enemy immediately in our
front. We paused but a moment while returning this fire, and then charged
with shouts in double-quick time, and the enemy fled in disorder. As we
were thus rapidly advancing Texas and Georgia regiments debouched form
the woods upon our right and joined us in the pursuit of the enemy.
Darkness had now come on, but the pursuit and desultory firing continued.
we passed rapidly over the ground that had been occupied by the enemy and
down a steep declivity, upon the crest of which their line of battle had been
formed, and at the bottom of which we captured several prisoners, who
cheered our men as we passed on, saying, "Go on, boys; go on; we are
yours; take the balance." We continued to press forward until we had
crossed the creek and ascended the hill upon the opposite side. The
Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers having become separated from the rest
of the brigade in the darkness, and being far in advance, the regiment was
halted upon the crest of the hill and upon the side of the creek next to the
enemy, and here we remained until orders were conveyed to us from
Brig.-Gen. Evans to retire and take up a position for the next
day's contest, which all knew was coming and would be severe. Before
daylight we were in position in the edge of the skirt of woods we had left the
afternoon before to attack the enemy.

Early in the morning the battle of July [August] 30 began. The Eighteenth
South Carolina Volunteers was posted in the skirt of woods above described.
Across a field in our front and some 200 yards or more in breadth the edge
of another skirt of woods was occupied by Gen. Hood's brigade, which
our brigade was to support. Toward midday heavy musketry fighting began
on our left. Soon we saw Hood's brigade move forward, and then we
received the order to advance. The Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers,
with the brigade, moved in line of battle to the front. Hood's brigade
engaged the first line of the enemy and drove him form the field before we
could reach the ground to participate in the engagement. In the mean time
we were subjected to a tremendous fire from two batteries of the enemy, one
of which, however, was soon silenced by the troops in our front whom we
were supporting. Onward we rapidly went without being able to see the
enemy for the intervening woods, but suffering severely form his batteries.
through woods and over fields we advanced, our line torn by shell and
somewhat disordered by the rapidity went without being able to see the
enemy foe the intervening woods, but suffering severely from his batteries.
Through woods and over fields we advanced, our line torn by shell and
somewhat disordered by the rapidity of the advance, the denseness of the
woods, and the number of killed and disabled. At last we entered the open
ground, still occupied by the enemy. As we rose to the crest of a slight ridge
a line of the enemy was suddenly discovered, who poured a volley into our
thinned ranks, and here some of our best officers fell, among them Col.
Gadberry. He fell pierced by a ball through the heart and expired almost
immediately. The fire of the enemy was promptly and vigorously returned
by the troops, and the enemy broke and fled in the utmost disorder. In the
mean time a heavy battery of the enemy was playing from the left upon our
flank. Toward this our attention was then directed, and with a handful of
men we advanced upon it, and when close upon it, and when what of its
support that could be seen were in flight, another line of the enemy advanced
form behind the hill upon which the battery was placed and composed of at
least a brigade of the enemy, and being without support, we were compelled
to retire.

The loss of the Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers in this engagement was
very heavy, being nearly or quite half the number that went into action.
Many of our best officers fell. Col. Gadberry, as previously stated, died
almost immediately. His loss was deeply deplored by the regiment. He was
governed by the highest principle to which an officer owes allegiance--a
fixed purpose to do his duty.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

W. H. WALLACE,
Col. Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers.

Capt. [A. L.] EVANS.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXIV.] CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA. PAGE 635-16
[Series I. Vol. 12. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 16.]


***************************************************************************

Antietam after battle report:

Report of Col. W. H. Wallace, Eighteenth South Carolina
Infantry, of the battles of Boonsborough and Sharpsburg.

CAMP NEAR WINCHESTER, VA.,
October 21, 1862.
CAPT.: In pursuance of orders from brigade headquarters, I have the
honor to report that on September 14, while a battle was being fought
between the Confederate forces and the enemy on South Mountain, near
Boonsborough, in Maryland, the Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers was
placed in position on the left of the turnpike road crossing the mountain from
Boonsborough, and near and just beyond the summit of the mountain.
Skirmishers were in front of us engaging the enemy, and were slowly
retiring toward our line. Gen. Rodes' brigade, some distance to our left,
being hard pressed by the enemy, we were, at this juncture, ordered to its
support. When the Eighteenth South Carolina volunteers arrived near the
right of this brigade, to was discovered to be retiring. Under orders from
Col. Stevens, commanding the brigade, the Eighteenth was then ordered
to change front forward on first company and advance, with the view of
taking a column of the enemy in flank which was advancing upon the point
first occupied by the Eighteenth, and which it had left to go to Rodes'
support. A sharp engagement ensued, when, a heavy column of the enemy
appearing upon our left flank, and the enemy, continuing to press upon
Rodes' brigade, were giving ground toward our rear, the Eighteenth was
ordered to face back toward the top of the mountain and form on the right
of the Twenty-second South Carolina Volunteers. The enemy advancing, we
engaged them in this position until, the troops upon the left giving away, the
enemy gained a point form which they enfiladed us again. Where-upon the
regiment fell back to the turnpike, where it remained until the march to
Sharpsburg began.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

W. H. WALLACE,
Col. Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers.

Capt. [A. L.] EVANS.

-----

CAMP NEAR WINCHESTER, VA.,
October 17, 1862.
CAPT.: In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters to regimental
commanders to report the operations of their regiments in the battle for
Sharpsburg, I respectfully report:

On the morning of September 17, at daylight, the Eighteenth Regiment South
Carolina Volunteers, under my command, was placed by Col. Stevens,
acting brigadier-general, in a position immediately in front of Sharpsburg
and to the left of the turnpike leading from Sharpsburg to Antietam Creek,
and constituting the extreme left of Maj.-Gen. Longstreet's corps. Here
the regiment remained in supporting distance of a succession of batteries that
occupied two hills in its front, and subjected to a heavy fire of shells and
shot from the batteries of the enemy until afternoon. Although the men were,
to a great extent, sheltered from the fire of the enemy by the brow of the
hill below which they were lying, yet several were wounded in this position.
As well as I could judge, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, Col. Stevens
(acting brigadier-general), being under the impression that a charge was
being attempted by the enemy upon a battery in position on the second hill,
immediately in our front, ordered the regiment forward to repel the charge.
The regiment moved rapidly by the left flank around the hill upon which
they had been lying, and, while ascending the hill upon which the battery
was placed that was being charged, formed in line of battle and advanced to
the battery, when it was discovered that the battery had succeeded in
defending itself and had driven off the enemy. The regiment then took
position close to and immediately upon the left flank of the battery in the
edge of a corn-field.

After occupying this position but a short time, and the battery having retired
under orders from Col. Stevens, the regiment was deployed as
skirmishers, and advanced over the hill to repel the advance of a heavy body
of skirmishers thrown forward by the enemy. Our direction of advance was
toward the turnpike leading from Sharpsburg toward the bridge across
Antietam Creek, and by a rapid movement we gained a rail fence running
nearly parallel with the turnpike. This position we held against a very
largely superior force of the enemy for a considerable time, when Col.
Stevens, who was upon the left of our line, seeing the left was beginning to
suffer severely, ordered the whole line to retreat to a stone fence some
distance in our rear and upon the road running in a north westerly direction
from Sharpsburg. This retreat was accomplished under a sharp fire of musketry
and artillery, from which the regiment sustained some damage. Almost
immediately the regiment was reduced to a handful of men; was reformed
and taken back to the position from which it had been ordered to retreat,
and, by the aid of Capt. Boyce's battery, held the position until night put
an end to the contest.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. WALLACE,
Col. Eighteenth South Carolina Volunteers.

Capt. [A. L.] EVANS.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 19. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 27

During the Battle of the Crater, Petersburg, VA nearly all of Company A was
killed during the explosion.

Source: Confederate Veteran April, 1922
Thank you very much for this. I will print it out and store it with the other records I have found.
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2019
Messages
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Welcome to the group from middle Alabama, it is good to have you join us.
Henry, my great-grandfather, is buried in Geraldine, Alabama alongside my grandfather Hardy and my father James. My dad was raised in Pisgah and eventually moved out to California in the 60s to work in Silicon Valley.

I visit my relatives once or twice a year out there. maybe we will bump into each other.
 
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Joined
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Messages
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Greetings from Germany and welcome aboard from The Traveler's Companion and Other Notable Biographies forum! :smile:
Thanks for the welcome. My VW Golf is named The General von Steuben... and yes we are getting ready to paint an 18th century Prussian flag on the top.
 
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Joined
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Welcome! The "school day" is very impressive: well done! I look forward to your perspectives in our discussions! Enjoy!
Thank You. My absolute favorite part of Living History are the school days. If I didn't have to work 40 hours a week I would do a lot more of them.
 
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