Heirloom Weights and Measures Conversion Chart

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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#1
Since weights and measurements were used diferently during this time period, thought an heirloom weights and measures conversion chart would be helpful.

Measurements:

1 wineglass 1/4 cup
1 jigger 1.5 fluid ounces
1 gill 1/2 cup
1 teacup a scant 3/4 cup
1 coffeecup a scant cup
1 tumbler 1 cup
1 pint 2 cups
1 quart 4 cups
1 peck 2 gallons-dry
1 pinch or dash what can be picked up between thumb and first two fingers; less than 1/8 teaspoon
1/2 pinch what can be picked up between thumb and one finger
1 saltspoon 1/4 teaspoon
1 kitchen spoon 1 teaspoon
1 dessert spoon 2 teaspoons or 1 soupspoon
1 spoonful 1 tablespoon more or less
1 saucer 1 heaping cup

Temperatures:

Very slow oven below 300 degrees F
Slow oven 300 degrees F
Moderately slow oven 325 degrees F
Moderate oven 350 degrees F
Moderately hot oven 375 degrees F
Quick oven 375 to 400 degrees F
Hot oven 400-425 degrees F
Very hot oven 450 to 475 degrees F
Extremely hot oven 500 degrees F or more

Common Weights:

1 penny weight 1/20 ounce
1 drachm 1/8 ounce
60 drops fluid 1 teaspoon
Butter the size of a egg 1/4 cup or 2 ounces
Butter the size of a walnut 1 tablespoon
Butter the size of a hazelnut 1 teaspoon
1 pound 2 cups liquid, or 4 cups flour, or 8 medium eggs with shells, or 10 eggs without shells, or 2 cups granulated sugar, or 2 1/3 cups packed brown sugar, or 3 3/4 cups confectioner's sugar, or 4 cups grated cabbage, cranberries, coffee or chopped celery, or 3 cups corn meal, or 2 cups uncooked rice, or 2 3/4 cups raisins or dried currants

From : http://homecooking.about.com/library/weekly/bloldconvert.htm
 

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donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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#6
I am again referring folks to this thread. In preparing the authentic recipes, it good to have copy of this so you can do the measurements or weights as the people would have in Civil War era and before.

As I have stated in some other threads on the term authentic, some recipes have been changed to show modern measurements. It doesn't mean the particular recipe is not one used at time of Civil War. The person publishing it has updated some so they can be understood by all who cook.
 

kevikens

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Jun 7, 2013
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#16
That measure of liquid known as a "gill". From my work as a docent at a Revolutionary War site I am familiar with some of these measurements, but once got into a discussion with another docent as to what that measurement, a gill, was in modern terms. In my Revolutionary War soldier garb I would cite the regulation authorizing Continental troops to receive a gill of whiskey per day. I had always learned that a gill was half a pint or eight liquid ounces. The other docent argued that, as above , a gill was half a cup or just four ounces. As it turned out a gill could mean either. In different parts of the British isles (and so in the American Colonies) the gill had a different definition. I wonder which one the troops preferred.
 
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#20
This isn't for food, but many 19th century domestic books and articles refer to a "nail." This is a measurement of fabric and equals 2.25 inches. For example, The Workman's Guide, by "A Lady," originally published in 1838, and widely used throughout the 19th century, suggests 14 to 20 nails of fabric for an apron (connecting it to cooking here).
 



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