Harvey, Yankee War Dog

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
Many regiments had canine mascots. One such was the 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, know as the "Barking Dog" regiment for its canine mascots. One of their favorites was Harvey a bulldog who came to the regiment with his master Sergeant Daniel M. Stearns. Stearns and Harvey had earlier been with the Eighth Pennsylvania Reserve. Harvey had been to the Virginia Peninsula and been wounded there. In Nov, 1862 Sergeant Stearns had been promoted to second lieutenant and he had got Harvey a collar that read "I am Lieutenant D.M. Stearns' dog: whose dog are you?"

Harvey and the soldiers of the 104th spent a year in Kentucky and East Tennessee. They then spent summer of 1864 in the Atlanta campaign. On Kennesaw Mountain, Harvey was wounded and captured. He was returned under a flag of truce. After that he was the most honored pet in the regiment.

Harvey was at the Battle of Franklin and survived midst fierce fighting. In Jan., 1865 the 104th and Harvey went to North Carolina. After that Harvey's career is lost to history. His owner Lt. Stearns finished the war as a Captain of Company F. Later after the war, Stearns became insane, resulting in his confinement in an Insane Asylum in Ohio. He died there.

Harvey's picture was taken several times. One photo was taken by the Vick's Studio in Alliance. Ohio. It is thought this was taken about the time the regiment was mustered out of service. Another photo shows Harvey posed with the 104th's coronet band. It is supposed this photo was taken in Cleveland, Tennessee in May, 1864. Another photo shows members of the 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry gathered for the group photograph at their 1866 reunion. They placed Harvey's picture in the front row. These photos can be seen at http://www.mahoningvalleycwrt.com/Member research/Harvey, Yankee War Dog.pdf

From: Harvey Yankee War Dog by Timothy R. Brookes
 

Nathanb1

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Awww.....except for the ears he looks a lot like our dear departed Phred. If he had half the personality of Phred, he must have been truly amazing. I just love these stories, Donna. Thanks for posting!
 

donna

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Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
The Massillon Museum in Massillon, Ohio has exhibit on Harvey. Apparently, when you enter their lobby paw prints lead to the exhibit. At the foot of Harvey's exhibit is a bowl of dog biscuits. Each visitor may take a biscuit to the reception desk to redeem for a free reproduction of the Harvey pin that the Grand Army of the Republic veterans organization created to commemorate their beloved mascot at reunions following the Civil War.

It seems this would be worth a visit. However, I need to find out how far Massillon, Ohio is from us.
 

donna

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bama You are right. Harvey was a pit bull. See http://whatapittie.org/proud-history-pitbull.html

There are several pit bulls mentioned in this article. There are "Sallie", the mascot for the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, "Jack", mascot of the 102nd Pennsylvania Infantry,"Old Harvey" as they refer to him, mascot of the 104th Ohio Infantry, "Jack Brutus" who served during Spanish-American War as mascot for Company K, First Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and "Stubby", World War I dog with 102nd Infantry 26th division

Other famous dogs are mentioned. One was Helen Keller's dog "Sir Thomas". Another was President Theodore Roosevelt's dog" Pete" who nearly caused an international scandal when he pulled off the pants of the French ambassador during a White House function.

The dogs are all wonderful with great stories.
 

donna

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The article I just referred to says " there is really no such thing as a Pit Bull. Pit Bull is a nickname given to American Staffordshire Terriers. American Pit Bull Terriers and Staffordshire Bull Terriers. These three breeds along with the English Bulldog, the Boston terrier and several other breeds have all evolved from a fighting dog bred in Europe in the early 1800s, known as the Bull and Terrier." From the Pit Bull Awareness Coalition.
 

diane

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Jan 23, 2010
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The bulldog used to be a very, very different looking dog than the stubby legged, barrel chested, jutting jawed breed we see now - which I think is actually rather a defective critter! A friend of mine has a pit bull and assures everyone he is NOT a pit bull - he is a Staffordshire terrier! :O o:
 

dawna

First Sergeant
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Feb 20, 2005
Location
canada
George Custer was a devoted and loving dog owner, having a canine friend at his side throughout the ACW.

"Custer was rarely without his dogs. They accompanied him on hunts and on campaigns; they ranged themselves at his feet, rested their heads on his lap, shared his bed and his food, got under foot, made nuisances of themselves, but never lost their special place in his affection. They were like people to him". The Vanishing American, Brian W. Dippie

01553r.jpg

The Peninsula, VA. Lt. George A. Custer with dog. 1862

custerdog.jpg

George Custer, (on right, reclining) and Federal officers of the Federal Provost Marshalls staff at Cumberland Landing pose with the mascot.

I think Donna may have previously posted a story on Sallie, (correct me if I`m wrong Donna) the brindel bull terrier who was the mascot for the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Below is their union in 1910 in which they honoured Sallie.

11th-pvi-reunion-1910.jpg

Veterans of the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at Gettysburg with Sallie, September 10, 1910

02288r.jpg

General Rufus Ingall`s dog.
 

dawna

First Sergeant
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canada
The Richmond Howitzers were formed shortly before the outbreak of the hostilities between the states. Thus, the Howitzers were among the first to see active service during the Civil War.

Stonewall, a Jack Russell Terrier with a smooth white coat marked with a few black spots, was a mascot with the 1st Company. As a puppy he wandered into the ranks of Confederate cannoneers during the summer fighting around Richmond, Virginia in 1862. An artillerist from the Richmond Howitzers noticed the little puppy and adopted him into the service of the south, naming him "Stonewall Jackson" or "Stonewall" for short, after the famous southern general.

Stonewall remained a small dog even when he was full grown. Never the less, he had a curious penchant for battle. When cannons began to thunder, Stonewall ran about wildly, jumping up and down. His yelps could be heard filling the lulls during firing. Amazingly, despite frequent exposure to battle, Stonewall was never wounded. Fearing his luck might run out, his guardians began to routinely place him in an empty ammo chest whenever they were under fire, a measure which continued to keep him out of harm's way.

Stonewall was also very intelligent. In camp, everyone tried to teach him tricks, especially Sergeant Van. Van carved a pipe out of wood and taught the dog to carry it. During roll call Stonewall would find his place in line next to Van then sit on his haunches with the pipe firmly clenched between his teeth. Just before the roll was called Stonewall would stand at attention. Van would remove the pipe from his mouth and place it between the toes of the dog's left fore paw. Stonewall would remain at attention in this manor until the company was dismissed.

Word of Stonewall's courage and cleverness spread through the Army of Northern Virginia. Fame, however, was something the artillerist could not protect him from. The small dog became the target of elaborate theft schemes. Toward the end of the war he was eventually lost to Louisiana troops who took him for their own. Regretfully, the Richmond Howitzers were never able to find him.

Stonewall was not forgotten. After the war his story was recorded in published accounts by the Richmond Howitzers, a tribute to the bond between the men and their little dog.



Fort Ward Museum & Historic Site, Animal Mascots of the CW
Story by: Greg Stumps
 

Karen Lips

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Location
Waxahachie,Texas
bama You are right. Harvey was a pit bull. See http://whatapittie.org/proud-history-pitbull.html

There are several pit bulls mentioned in this article. There are "Sallie", the mascot for the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, "Jack", mascot of the 102nd Pennsylvania Infantry,"Old Harvey" as they refer to him, mascot of the 104th Ohio Infantry, "Jack Brutus" who served during Spanish-American War as mascot for Company K, First Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and "Stubby", World War I dog with 102nd Infantry 26th division

Other famous dogs are mentioned. One was Helen Keller's dog "Sir Thomas". Another was President Theodore Roosevelt's dog" Pete" who nearly caused an international scandal when he pulled off the pants of the French ambassador during a White House function.

The dogs are all wonderful with great stories.
I surprised a movie has not been made about some of these dogs.
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
The Massillon Museum in Massillon, Ohio has exhibit on Harvey. Apparently, when you enter their lobby paw prints lead to the exhibit. At the foot of Harvey's exhibit is a bowl of dog biscuits. Each visitor may take a biscuit to the reception desk to redeem for a free reproduction of the Harvey pin that the Grand Army of the Republic veterans organization created to commemorate their beloved mascot at reunions following the Civil War.

It seems this would be worth a visit. However, I need to find out how far Massillon, Ohio is from us.

I enjoyed seeing that the Massillon Museum was remembering Harey's story this way and sharing it with a new generation of young historians and museum visitors. Nice folks there at the museum, too. I collect dog pins as a hobby and wrote to Massillon to ask if I could buy one of the reproduction Harvey pins. They were kind enough to send me a complimentary pin. I'm delighted to be able to add one of the faithful Civil War dogs to my collection!
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
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Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
George Custer was a devoted and loving dog owner, having a canine friend at his side throughout the ACW.

"Custer was rarely without his dogs. They accompanied him on hunts and on campaigns; they ranged themselves at his feet, rested their heads on his lap, shared his bed and his food, got under foot, made nuisances of themselves, but never lost their special place in his affection. They were like people to him". The Vanishing American, Brian W. Dippie

01553r.jpg

The Peninsula, VA. Lt. George A. Custer with dog. 1862

custerdog.jpg

George Custer, (on right, reclining) and Federal officers of the Federal Provost Marshalls staff at Cumberland Landing pose with the mascot.

I think Donna may have previously posted a story on Sallie, (correct me if I`m wrong Donna) the brindel bull terrier who was the mascot for the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Below is their union in 1910 in which they honoured Sallie.

11th-pvi-reunion-1910.jpg

Veterans of the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at Gettysburg with Sallie, September 10, 1910

02288r.jpg

General Rufus Ingall`s dog.

Dawna--where did you find General Rufus Ingall's dog picture? Nice find!

M. E. Wolf
 
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