Hari Jones Passes Away: Leading Scholar of African American Roles in the Civil War

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Jan 7, 2013
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Long Island, NY
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Hari Jones, who has done enormous work to increase our knowledge of African Americans in the Civil War passed away over the weekend. Jones was curator of the African American Civil War Museum in Washington, D.C.​
 
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Yulie

Corporal
Joined
Jul 31, 2008
Location
Directly North of the Canadian Border
I was informed about Hari's passing on Saturday via a telephone call. I am devastated. I was looking forward to seeing him at the 20th Anniversary of the AACWMM next month. I can't even remember when I first met him because he has been a factor in the USCT community for so long. With each encounter I got to know more about him not only as a scholar but as a man who was proud of his military service and was passionate about life and family. I will miss him beyond words. I will always cherish my memories of him, including this one:

Hari was the banquet keynote speaker at a USCT Conference in Clarksville, Tennessee about six years ago. It was the one occasion that my Mom agreed to come to (as she would phrase it) one of my history things. My Mom has little interest in my involvement in history, so it was a surprise that she agreed to come along with a cousin to attend the banquet. My Mom was captivated by Hari and his topic. She hushed me an my cousin and gave a Mom Look when we tried to say something while Hari was talking. Afterwards, Hari came over to our table and gave me a hug and I introduced him to my Mom and cousin. Hari was his gracious self and spent some time talking with my Mom. My Mom was really impressed with Hari. One has to understand that it takes A LOT to impress my Mom. She was also impressed that I personally knew him. Don't know why... but she was. So, the fact that Hari got the stamp of approval from Mom was important. She got a sense of the folks I was "hanging out with" and all that "history stuff" that I do.

Hari was an impressive guy. He was loved by many. He will be missed by many.

God has called him home. I am so blessed to have known him.

-Yulie
 
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Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Location
Long Island, NY
I was informed about Hari's passing on Saturday via a telephone call. I am devastated. I was looking forward to seeing him at the 20th Anniversary of the AACWMM next month. I can't even remember when I first met him because he has been a factor in the USCT community for so long. With each encounter I got to know more about him not only as a scholar but as a man who was proud of his military service and was passionate about life and family. I will miss him beyond words. I will always cherish my memories of him, including this one:

Hari was the banquet keynote speaker at a USCT Conference in Clarksville, Tennessee about six years ago. It was the one occasion that my Mom agreed to come to (as she would phrase it) one of my history things. My Mom has little interest in my involvement in history, so it was a surprise that she agreed to come along with a cousin to attend the banquet. My Mom was captivated by Hari and his topic. She hushed me an my cousin and gave a Mom Look when we tried to say something while Hari was talking. Afterwards, Hari came over to our table and gave me a hug and I introduced him to my Mom and cousin. Hari was his gracious self and spent some time talking with my Mom. My Mom was really impressed with Hari. One has to understand that it takes A LOT to impress my Mom. She was also impressed that I personally knew him. Don't know why... but she was. So, the fact that Hari got the stamp of approval from Mom was important. She got a sense of the folks I was "hanging out with" and all that "history stuff" that I do.

Hari was an impressive guy. He was loved by many. He will be missed by many.

God has called him home. I am so blessed to have known him.

-Yulie
Thanks for the heartfelt recollection Yulie.
 

Yulie

Corporal
Joined
Jul 31, 2008
Location
Directly North of the Canadian Border
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Hari Jones
November 01, 1958 - June 22, 2018

Hari's Obituary

Hari Jones, of Washington, D. C., passed away June 22, 2018 in Washington D. C., at the age of 59 years.

Hari was born November 1, 1958 in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma. He attended Pauls Valley Schools and is a May 1976 graduate of Pauls Valley High School. At an early age he became a member of the Bethlehem Baptist Church in Pauls Valley. Two months after his graduating high school he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and served as an infantryman, an artillery officer and an intelligence officer. Reaching the rank of Staff Sergeant as an enlisted Marine, he retired as a Captain in 1997 after twenty-one years of service.

He furthered his education by attending the University of Oklahoma where he earned his Bachelor’s Degree.

Hari Jones was a writer, lecturer, historian, curator and motivational speaker. For twelve years, he was the assistant director and curator at the African American Civil War Freedom Foundation and Museum in Washington, DC. He was also an independent history consultant and on the Board of Directors of the National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he presented his award-winning lecture series "The Lost Story" in the fall of 2015. He is one of the foremost authorities on the role of African Americans in the Civil War.

Hari curated the permanent exhibit at the African American Civil War Museum entitled "The Glorious March to Liberty". In that exhibit, his commitment to the use of primary sources is evident. "In our exhibit," said Hari, "we quote no scholars. If you were not there in the making of the history, you do not get a quote in our exhibit." Hari has worked on exhibits on display across the country. He was a content developer for the National Park Service (NPS) museum at the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site at Tuskegee, Alabama, a content adviser for the American Civil War Center exhibit "Take Our Stand" and a content adviser for the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) exhibit "Discovering the Civil War".

Hari has appeared in over fifty television programs and documentaries viewed on CSPAN, Fox News, NBC, PBS, the American Heroes Channel, the History Channel, the Smithsonian Channel and numerous local outlets. Among those programs were Who Do You Think You Are? featuring Vanessa Williams; Legends and Lies with Bill O’Reilly; and the Peabody Award winning The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates.

Most recently he was working on a project for the DUSABLE Museum of African American History in Chicago; the TV show 'Legends and Lies" for Bill O'Reilly as well as touring and giving lectures throughout the United States.

Hari is preceded in death by his mother, Gladys McCowen; father, John Chapman; a daughter, Julia Jones; two brothers, Gregory Jones and Ray Clayton Jones.

Surviving family include: one son, Earnest Harold Lomax-Jones of Annapolis, Maryland; two grandchildren and six brothers and sisters.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday, July 3, 2018 at 1:00 pm at Stufflebean-Coffey Funeral Home Chapel officiated by Ray Jones. Interment will be at the Bethlehem Cemetery in Pauls Valley under the direction of Stufflebean-Coffey Funeral Home.
 
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Hari Jones
November 01, 1958 - June 22, 2018

Hari's Obituary

Hari Jones, of Washington, D. C., passed away June 22, 2018 in Washington D. C., at the age of 59 years.

Hari was born November 1, 1958 in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma. He attended Pauls Valley Schools and is a May 1976 graduate of Pauls Valley High School. At an early age he became a member of the Bethlehem Baptist Church in Pauls Valley. Two months after his graduating high school he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and served as an infantryman, an artillery officer and an intelligence officer. Reaching the rank of Staff Sergeant as an enlisted Marine, he retired as a Captain in 1997 after twenty-one years of service.

He furthered his education by attending the University of Oklahoma where he earned his Bachelor’s Degree.

Hari Jones was a writer, lecturer, historian, curator and motivational speaker. For twelve years, he was the assistant director and curator at the African American Civil War Freedom Foundation and Museum in Washington, DC. He was also an independent history consultant and on the Board of Directors of the National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he presented his award-winning lecture series "The Lost Story" in the fall of 2015. He is one of the foremost authorities on the role of African Americans in the Civil War.

Hari curated the permanent exhibit at the African American Civil War Museum entitled "The Glorious March to Liberty". In that exhibit, his commitment to the use of primary sources is evident. "In our exhibit," said Hari, "we quote no scholars. If you were not there in the making of the history, you do not get a quote in our exhibit." Hari has worked on exhibits on display across the country. He was a content developer for the National Park Service (NPS) museum at the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site at Tuskegee, Alabama, a content adviser for the American Civil War Center exhibit "Take Our Stand" and a content adviser for the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) exhibit "Discovering the Civil War".

Hari has appeared in over fifty television programs and documentaries viewed on CSPAN, Fox News, NBC, PBS, the American Heroes Channel, the History Channel, the Smithsonian Channel and numerous local outlets. Among those programs were Who Do You Think You Are? featuring Vanessa Williams; Legends and Lies with Bill O’Reilly; and the Peabody Award winning The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates.

Most recently he was working on a project for the DUSABLE Museum of African American History in Chicago; the TV show 'Legends and Lies" for Bill O'Reilly as well as touring and giving lectures throughout the United States.

Hari is preceded in death by his mother, Gladys McCowen; father, John Chapman; a daughter, Julia Jones; two brothers, Gregory Jones and Ray Clayton Jones.

Surviving family include: one son, Earnest Harold Lomax-Jones of Annapolis, Maryland; two grandchildren and six brothers and sisters.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday, July 3, 2018 at 1:00 pm at Stufflebean-Coffey Funeral Home Chapel officiated by Ray Jones. Interment will be at the Bethlehem Cemetery in Pauls Valley under the direction of Stufflebean-Coffey Funeral Home.
Oh Noes not Fox News and legends and lies......he probally lost several forum members there...….
 
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