Happy to receive an early Christmas gift. (Book)

Waterloo50

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Christmas came early for me today, my wife couldn’t resist letting me have a book that she’d bought for me. It’s quite a difficult book to get hold of (especially on this side of the pond) it’s called ‘the American steam locomotive in the 20th century’ and it’s written by Tom Morrison, the thing is it’s full of everything that I enjoy, it has a ton of technical drawings, plenty of photos that cover the development, engineering and construction of all types of steam locomotives.
I just wanted to share my joy at owning such a magnificent book. I’m sure that it will help pass the time whilst we’re on lockdown.
662E032D-7C4C-477B-A931-3E91717F2CF7.jpeg
 

Dave DuBrucq

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Oct 28, 2020
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Tennessee
Christmas came early for me today, my wife couldn’t resist letting me have a book that she’d bought for me. It’s quite a difficult book to get hold of (especially on this side of the pond) it’s called ‘the American steam locomotive in the 20th century’ and it’s written by Tom Morrison, the thing is it’s full of everything that I enjoy, it has a ton of technical drawings, plenty of photos that cover the development, engineering and construction of all types of steam locomotives.
I just wanted to share my joy at owning such a magnificent book. I’m sure that it will help pass the time whilst we’re on lockdown.
View attachment 381981
A wonderful and thoughtful gift. Enjoy!
 

Lubliner

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It looks to be a good sized book with plenty of pages. I am always interested in the critical aspects of a book; preface, publisher's page, copyright, printing history, appendices, bibliography, etc. Then of course the format of commentary that is interspersed with pictures and diagrams. A book in itself can be a work of art. Thank you for sharing your's with us here @Waterloo50. Keep us updated!
Lubliner.
 

Waterloo50

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It looks to be a good sized book with plenty of pages. I am always interested in the critical aspects of a book; preface, publisher's page, copyright, printing history, appendices, bibliography, etc. Then of course the format of commentary that is interspersed with pictures and diagrams. A book in itself can be a work of art. Thank you for sharing your's with us here @Waterloo50. Keep us updated!
Lubliner.
Hi Lubliner,
It’s an excellent book.
The preface explains that the author primarily sourced his information from several weekly periodicals dating from 1856 -1908 (Railroad Gazette) and Railroad Age Gazette, he was able to research each Gazette which at the time was printing between two thousand and three thousand pages per year. He explains that the densely printed pages covered every imaginable aspect of the American railroad industry in exhaustive detail. The author uses original period writings, comments and opinions of the most eminent engineers and executives of the American locomotive steam industry.

The publisher points out that the present work is a reprint of the illustrated case bound edition of ‘The American Steam locomotive in the Twentieth Century, first published in 2018.

The copyright is standard and covers the usual legal jargon.

The appendix is very well set out and would be helpful for future research as it covers every article page number and the title of each periodical used.

As for the layout of the book it’s incredible, when the author describes for example a ‘truck centering device’ or a ‘Schmidt smoke box superheater’, he includes original period photos with accompanying technical drawings, each has a clear and concise description of the various parts.

The photographs throughout the book (most pages have a photo) are very good and of clear quality. What really makes this book a good read is the fact that the author is an engineer himself and as a result he is able to explain things that anyone with an interest in the subject can understand. It’s technical but not so much that you need a PhD in engineering, it’s aimed at the steam enthusiasts but would equally appeal to those interested in industrial history.

You guys have to trust me on this, it’s an excellent book, I can guarantee that even the most knowledgeable steam nerd would learn something new from this book.

Marks out of 10....it definitely gets a 10+
 

Mrs. V

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May 5, 2017
Hi Lubliner,
It’s an excellent book.
The preface explains that the author primarily sourced his information from several weekly periodicals dating from 1856 -1908 (Railroad Gazette) and Railroad Age Gazette, he was able to research each Gazette which at the time was printing between two thousand and three thousand pages per year. He explains that the densely printed pages covered every imaginable aspect of the American railroad industry in exhaustive detail. The author uses original period writings, comments and opinions of the most eminent engineers and executives of the American locomotive steam industry.

The publisher points out that the present work is a reprint of the illustrated case bound edition of ‘The American Steam locomotive in the Twentieth Century, first published in 2018.

The copyright is standard and covers the usual legal jargon.

The appendix is very well set out and would be helpful for future research as it covers every article page number and the title of each periodical used.

As for the layout of the book it’s incredible, when the author describes for example a ‘truck centering device’ or a ‘Schmidt smoke box superheater’, he includes original period photos with accompanying technical drawings, each has a clear and concise description of the various parts.

The photographs throughout the book (most pages have a photo) are very good and of clear quality. What really makes this book a good read is the fact that the author is an engineer himself and as a result he is able to explain things that anyone with an interest in the subject can understand. It’s technical but not so much that you need a PhD in engineering, it’s aimed at the steam enthusiasts but would equally appeal to those interested in industrial history.

You guys have to trust me on this, it’s an excellent book, I can guarantee that even the most knowledgeable steam nerd would learn something new from this book.

Marks out of 10....it definitely gets a 10+
Enjoy your book! My son has been a rail fan since he was wee tiny! I still remember the first steamer I rode, she was on a special run down in Cochocoton County..standing by the engine, I marveled at how huge it was!

Me Mum remembers riding the train to college, and to visit relatives. I’ve been to the old depot there in Petosky Michigan. It’s right down by the lake, and now is a museum. Very cool.
 

Lubliner

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Now you have me getting excited about the book, @Waterloo50 as though I could really find the time to read it. I must keep wishing upon the wrong star! You remember @Mrs. V that Tad Lincoln was a fanatic on railroads, and John Hay I think it was, would joke that he knew the time-tables and routes better than the war committee. I remember a few first impressions at an early age that overwhelmed my curiosity; The California Gold-Rush in 2nd grade, Billy Yank and Johnny Reb in third, and girls in fourth. The curiosity never dies!
Lubliner.
 

Dusty

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Joined
Jun 22, 2017
Location
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania
Congratulations on your very nice present. I have always liked the old trains as I grew up in the coal regions of Pennsylvania and can remember as a child the old steam engines in Port Carbon and Tamaqua, Pennsylvania as they lined the tracks along the city streets and train yards and waited at the coal breakers to be loaded. I can still remember lying in bed at night as a child and hearing the shrill whistle and then the steady chug of the engine until it picked up speed. I had an old Marx steam train set as a child around 1950 and I still have the Lionel Seaboard Freight Chesapeake and Ohio train and cars with the engine that has the working smoke. (You add drops of special oil into the stack) however the transformer does not work very well anymore. It is from 1995.
I have the book, “STEAM An Enduring Legacy” the railroad photographs of Joel Jensen. Text and photos.
And a few hours away from us is the Strasburg Railroad and Pennsylvania Railroad Museum. The old steam train offers a ride through the Pennsylvania Dutch countryside on original passenger cars.
Wishing you a very Merry Christmas!
 

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