Hamilton, Ohio Horse Rehabilitation Camp site

Ferd454231

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Sometime in 1863 a former infantry training site was converted to a horse rehabilitation on the then outskirts of Hamilton Ohio (just to the north of Cincinnati). Local historian, the late Jim Blount, found evidence for the camp in local newspaper of the time. The camp housed as many as 1000 horses. Fresh water was pumped into a reservoir and throughout the camp, including the stables. Dead horses were disposed of at the north end of the camp. The vets on duty were allowed to sell the horse hides and keep the money! According to the articles Jim found local boys were allowed to race the horses for exercise later in the horses' rehabilitation. The camp continued for a while after the war as the government was trying to recoup the expense by selling the horses off. After the war the horse boneyard was used by a local man to grind the remains and sell if off as fertilized. Part of the site was converted into a distillery. The 1913 flood cause the river banks to be heightened as a levee. Warehouses were built on the site in the early 20th century. In fact I worked as a janitor in the brick faced warehouse one summer in 1967 never guessing what it had been. Not a stirring Civil War site but one that certainly served the Northern war effort. H

Hamilton Horse Rehabilitation camp Corner of Black and N. Third or the NE boundary of the camp.jpg


Looking toward the West of the Horse Camp.jpg


The Northernside of the camp and where dead horses were disposed of..jpg


The primary reason for the location of the camp was access to the watr of the Great Miami Rive...jpg


The Horse camp's Eastern bpundry which would have extended down to the trees seen on the right...jpg


looking North on the eastern side of the Horse Camp.jpg


Now looking tothe West on Vine street which would be the Southern boundary of the Horse Camp.jpg
 

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Ferd454231

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I want to apologize since I just realized that the labels for the photos did not come across - DUH!
#1 is the north side of the horse camp looking south on the eastern side. You would enter the camp from the east
#2 is looking west along the northern perimeter
#3 is about where the dead horses were disposed of
#4 is the Great Miami river. The ground would have been lower during the war. The city raised the levee in the photo after a catastrophic flood in 1913. The river supplied water and power for a mill to grind horse feed.
#5 is the eastern side of the camp ending where you see trees.
#6 is the eastern side looking north and the road to the left is the southern boundary of the camp
#7 is the southern end stopping at the river.
Hope that clarifies the dimensions of the place.
Redbob the Gwyn and cambell factory is about 3 blacks south and two blocks east of where I took the last two photos.
Mrs V, I worked one summer at the redbrick warehouse on the left in photo 6. I never had heard of that place either. Thanks. H
 

JPK Huson 1863

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I got distracted by the vets being allowed to keep hides. Found an ad placed by the government when Giesboro was outside DC. Someone had the brilliant idea of selling rights to take all the dead horses there, as in a contract? They asked thousands of dollars, pretty sure there were no takers. Tom Sawyer's fence. You know. " YOU could have this wonderful contract for the low low price of 2,000 bucks, get in before we give them to someone else! "
 

O' Be Joyful

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Use-ta be: Zinn-zä-nätti o-HI-o The BIG city.
I have been to Hamilton many times and I recognize these locations. Had zero idea of their significance. Thank you for posting this @Ferd454231.

My mind is fuzzy, as it has been awhile, but how far from the Mosler Safe factory is this?

Btw, Mosler designed and installed the safe and cases that contain and protects Our Nation's most valuable documents at the National Archives--such as an original of the Bill of Rights-- "safe" when the gov't contracted with them in early 1950's to keep them protected from nuclear attack.

Working under the looming deadline, Mosler engineers, technicians, and machinists worked around the clock to design and build a vault worthy of protecting the nation’s most valuable documents.
The company constructed the vault in Hamilton, Ohio, then brought it to Washington, DC, for installation.
The vault was made of steel and reinforced concrete. It was located about 20 feet beneath the floor of the exhibition hall. Built during the Cold War era, the vault was designed to be fireproof, shockproof, and bombproof.
During visiting hours, the three documents were displayed in then state-of-the art cases.
mosler-safe-nara-id-12167779-e1450375683937.jpg
Mosler Safe being constructed, 1952. (National Archives Identifier 12167779)
 

Ferd454231

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Darryl, I'll check and w/ Butler County Historical society too.
"O Be" the Mosler safe company (where I also worked at for a summer)is a good mile and a half south of the Horse hospital. It was on Rt. 4 and Grand Blvd. My grandpa owned a bar on the corner of Grand and Schuler just in walking distance to the Mosler plant and the Diebold plant just across the street. That is how he fed his family. Thanks safe makers. H
 

TnFed

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Darryl, I'll check and w/ Butler County Historical society too.
"O Be" the Mosler safe company (where I also worked at for a summer)is a good mile and a half south of the Horse hospital. It was on Rt. 4 and Grand Blvd. My grandpa owned a bar on the corner of Grand and Schuler just in walking distance to the Mosler plant and the Diebold plant just across the street. That is how he fed his family. Thanks safe makers. H
So this site was on the east side? I guess the west side was Rossville then.
 

TnFed

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Yep west side man myself. Moved there from Westchester. I would never go back. Hamilton has the reputation for having been a little rough in days gone by. But I think the west side is the best place to live in Butler County.
 
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Seemingly we have some folks in the southwestern Ohio region that might do well to get connected. I am leading a tour at Greenwood Cemetery on October 26th, 10:00 am, and I also have a Facebook page trying to get folks in the region together to talk the Civil War and enjoy visiting some of the breweries in town. To find out more info (if you are Facebook connected) try this link:

https://www.facebook.com/BrewsBattlesandBS

Sorry to hijack the thread, Hank...but as there seem to be a good number of folks in our region, it is a good opportunity to gather together!
 

Ferd454231

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Darryl,
You just be my guest. I'll be there with my Gwin and Campbell. And eeric I spent four good years in Oxford. Bob Hope was my graduation speaker! That is as close as I got to him because I was stuck on a fire support base when he came to Bien Hoa. H
 


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