H Company 21st Regiment Kentucky Infantry Volunteers

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Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
3
Location
Alachua County, FL
Hi. New here and found some great information to share as I was doing some genealogical research and, just wanted to share it. To me, it's priceless information that some might find interesting or helpful.
My interest with H Company 21st Regiment Kentucky Infantry Volunteers comes as a result of my g-g grandfather, Private James R. Stanley, was drafted into this outfit in 1864.
I have discovered that there was, on my paternal side, literally brother fighting against brother. And, varying differences on the maternal side as well - but no literal brother against brother on this side (as of yet).
Found this information on ancestry.com - there is no name of the 1000+ page book that I could figure out. These are members of H Co., 21st Regiment, KY Infantry. One page provides their name/rank/enrollment date/mustered in when and where/length of service/mustered out when/where. Line up the next page so that the numbers correspond and the remarks will tell you what happened to that soldier (i.e., KIA, discharged, deserted, etc.). There is a page number on the upper corners of the sheets, so that is helpful in getting them in the right order.
This is my first post, so I'm not sure how this is going to work. I saved it as a PDF document and I hope it is large enough to be legible when opened. I will post more as I find and am able.
 

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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,860
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Hi. New here and found some great information to share as I was doing some genealogical research and, just wanted to share it. To me, it's priceless information that some might find interesting or helpful.
My interest with H Company 21st Regiment Kentucky Infantry Volunteers comes as a result of my g-g grandfather, Private James R. Stanley, was drafted into this outfit in 1864.
I have discovered that there was, on my paternal side, literally brother fighting against brother. And, varying differences on the maternal side as well - but no literal brother against brother on this side (as of yet).
Found this information on ancestry.com - there is no name of the 1000+ page book that I could figure out. These are members of H Co., 21st Regiment, KY Infantry. One page provides their name/rank/enrollment date/mustered in when and where/length of service/mustered out when/where. Line up the next page so that the numbers correspond and the remarks will tell you what happened to that soldier (i.e., KIA, discharged, deserted, etc.). There is a page number on the upper corners of the sheets, so that is helpful in getting them in the right order.
This is my first post, so I'm not sure how this is going to work. I saved it as a PDF document and I hope it is large enough to be legible when opened. I will post more as I find and am able.
Nashville, TN after battle report:

No. 25.

Report of Lieut. Col. James C. Evans, Twenty-first Kentucky Infantry, of
operations December 15-16, 1864.

HDQRS. TWENTY-FIRST Regt. KENTUCKY VET. VOL. INFTY.,
In the Field, near Columbia, Tenn., December 19, 1864.
CAPT.: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations
of my regiment during the engagement in front of Nashville, on the 15th and
16th:

On the morning of the 15th, at daylight, I moved my regiment in obedience
to your orders, with the brigade, from its position near the Granny White
pike, about half a mile to the right, and took position in the front line of the
brigade, just outside the breast-works, with the Forty-fifth Ohio Volunteer
Infantry on my right and the One hundred and fifteenth Illinois on my left.
I was not engaged during the day, the brigade being in reserve. At night my
regiment was put in bivouac on the Granny White pike. During the day I had
1 man killed (J. A. Nicholas, private, Company E) and 1 slightly wounded
(W. A. Gibbany, private, Company C.) On the morning of the 16th, at
daylight, I moved out by the right flank to the first line of works, from
which the rebels were driven the evening before, at a point about half way
between the Granny White and Franklin pikes, and was there assigned to a
position in the front line, with the Forty-fifth Ohio on my right and the
Ninety-sixth Illinois on my left. We then moved forward to the second line
of works where we halted for about one hour. We then moved to the front
and right to a point about half a mile from the position occupied by the
rebels, where we were halted and aligned, and then moved forward, all the
time subjected to a heavy fire from the rebel artillery,
about 400 yards, where we were halted and ordered by you to throw up
works, which we did. At this point I had 1 officer and 1 man killed by a
solid shot, First Lieut. Hugh A. Hedger, commanding Company I (a
brave and gallant young officer), and C. B. Thompson, private, Company
I. At about 4 p. m., in obedience to your instructions, I got my regiment
ready for a charge upon the enemy's works, which were about 600 yards off
across a cornfield. A few minutes after the Forty-fifth jumped their works
with a yell (the signal for my moving) and away we went; every man, it
seemed, tried to get the lead. In about three minutes from the time of leaving
our works we entered the rebel works, the rebels-what we did not
capture-flying in every direction before us. My colors were the first planted
upon the four guns captured by the brigade, though the Ninety-sixth Illinois
and Forty-fifth Ohio deserve as much credit each for the capture as my
regiment. Just in rear of the works I halted my regiment and reformed them,
and then moved forward, by your instructions, in pursuit of the rebels, but
failed to get up with them before dark, when we went into bivouac.

My officers and men acted with great coolness and bravery, as they have
always heretofore done while engaged with the enemy. In the charge I lost
3 men slightly wounded, Corpl. W. S. McMeekin, Company E; J. N.
Owens, private Company C, and D. N. Morton, private, Company F. The
reason why I had so few men hurt was because the rebels fired almost
entirely above us.

I cannot close my report without mentioning the gallantry with which the
Forty-fifth Ohio and Ninety-sixth Illinois moved in the charge; they are both
excellent regiments. In the pursuit of Hood's army so far my regiment has
not been engaged.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. C. EVANS,
Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. H. F. TEMPLE,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 1st Div., 4th Army Corps.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 204-93 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. LVII.
[Series I. Vol. 45. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 93.]
 
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