US Jud Grier, Robert Cooper - U.S. Associate Justice

Robert Cooper Grier

:us34stars:
Grier.jpg


Born: March 5, 1794

Birthplace: Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

Father: Isaac Grier 1763 – 1814
(Buried: Riverview Cemetery, Northumberland, Pennsylvania)​

Mother: Elizabeth Cooper 1762 – 1844

Wife: Isabella Rose 1807 – 1886
(Buried: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania)​

Married: 1829

Children:

Sarah Rose Grier Beck 1830 – 1926​
(Buried: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania)​
Mary Rose Grier Smith 1832 – 1900​
(Buried: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania)​
Dr. William Potter Grier 1834 – 1866​
(Buried: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania)​
Elizabeth Cooper Grier Mayer 1837 – 1913​
(Buried: Hollenback Cemetery, Wilkes–Barre, Pennsylvania)​
Isabella Rose Grier 1839 – 1851​
(Buried: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania)​
Helen Grier LeConte 1842 – 1917​
(Buried: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania)​

Political Party: Democratic Party

Education:


1812: Graduated from Dickinson College
Death.jpg

Occupation before War:

1817 – 1818: Attorney in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania​
1818 – 1833: Attorney in Danville, Pennsylvania​
1833 – 1846: President Judge District Court of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania​
1846 – 1870: Associate Justice of United States Supreme Court​
1847: Ruled in favor of Moffat in the case of Cook v. Moffat.
1851: Case of United States V. Hanway
Believer of all good Christians must reject the abolitionist cause.​
1852: Author of majority opinion in case of Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad Company V. Louisa Railroad Company
1852: Supporter of Illinois Law that punished any citizen who hid runaway slaves.​
1854: Investigated by House Judiciary Committee due to conduct in the case of Pennsylvania v. Wheeling and Belmont Bridge Company
1857: Ruled with the Majority in the Dred Scott v. Sandford Case.​
Distant Cousin of Future Vice President Alexander Stephens.​

Civil War Career:

1846 – 1870: Associate Justice of United States Supreme Court​
1861 – 1865: Supporter of the Lincoln Administration.​
1862: Discontinued Circuit riding.​
1863: Author of the opinion on the Prize Cases Which declared the blockade of the southern ports as Constitutional.​
Despised Disunion as much as he did abolitionism.​

Occupation after War:

1846 – 1870: Associate Justice of United States Supreme Court​
1867: Suffered from the effects of three strokes.​
1870: Retired from Supreme Court after pressured by his colleagues.​

Died:
September 25, 1870

Place of Death: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Age at time of Death: 76 years old

Burial Place: West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania
 
Last edited by a moderator:
1851: Convicted Castner Hanway of Treason in case of United States V. Hanway
I'm pretty sure this is incorrect. Justice Grier gave the jury a definition of treason earlier in the trial and then after the closing arguments had been made, Justice Grier gave his instructions to the jury:

"Without desiring to invade the prerogatives of the jury in judging the facts of this case, the Court feel bound to say, that they do not think the transaction with which the prisoner is charged with being connected, rises to the dignity of treason or levying war. Not because the numbers or force was insufficient. But 1st, For want of any proof of previous conspiracy to make a general and public resistance to any law of the United States . 2ndly, Because there is no evidence that any person concerned in the transaction knew there were such acts of Congress, as those with which they were charged with conspiring to resist by force and arms, or had any other intention than to protect one another from what they termed kidnappers (by which slang term they probably included not only actual kidnappers, but all masters and owners seeking to recapture their slaves, and the officers and agents assisting therein).


"The testimony of the prosecution shows that notice had been given that certain fugitives were pursued; the riot, insurrection, tumult, or whatever you may call it, was but a sudden `conclamatio’ or running together, to prevent the capture of certain of their friends or companions, or to rescue them if arrested. Previous to this transaction, so far as we are informed, no attempt had been made to arrest fugitives in the neighborhood under the new act of Congress by a public officer. Heretofore arrests had been made by the owner in person, or his agent properly authorized, or by an officer of the law. Individuals without any authority, but incited by cupidity, and the hope of obtaining the reward offered for the return of a fugitive, had heretofore under- taken to seize them by force and violence, to invade the sanctity of private dwellings at night, and insult the feeling and prejudices of the people. It is not to be wondered at that a people subject to such inroads, should consider odious the perpetrators of such deeds and denominate them kidnappers-and that the subjects of this treatment should have been encouraged in resisting such aggressions, where the rightful claimant could not be distinguished from the odious kidnapper, or the fact be ascertained whether the person seized, deported or stolen in this manner, was a free man or a slave. But the existence of such feelings is no evidence of a determination or conspiracy by the people to publicly resist any legislation of Congress, or levy war against the United States. That in consequence of such excitement, such an outrage should have been committed, is deeply to be deplored. That the persons engaged in it are guilty of aggravated riot and murder cannot be denied. But riot and murder are offences against the State Government. It would be a dangerous precedent for the Court and jury in this case to extend the crime of treason by construction to doubtful cases.”

It took the jury 15 minutes to find Hanway "Not Guilty."
 

gentlemanrob

Brigadier General
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 11, 2016
Location
South Carolina
I'm pretty sure this is incorrect. Justice Grier gave the jury a definition of treason earlier in the trial and then after the closing arguments had been made, Justice Grier gave his instructions to the jury:

"Without desiring to invade the prerogatives of the jury in judging the facts of this case, the Court feel bound to say, that they do not think the transaction with which the prisoner is charged with being connected, rises to the dignity of treason or levying war. Not because the numbers or force was insufficient. But 1st, For want of any proof of previous conspiracy to make a general and public resistance to any law of the United States . 2ndly, Because there is no evidence that any person concerned in the transaction knew there were such acts of Congress, as those with which they were charged with conspiring to resist by force and arms, or had any other intention than to protect one another from what they termed kidnappers (by which slang term they probably included not only actual kidnappers, but all masters and owners seeking to recapture their slaves, and the officers and agents assisting therein).


"The testimony of the prosecution shows that notice had been given that certain fugitives were pursued; the riot, insurrection, tumult, or whatever you may call it, was but a sudden `conclamatio’ or running together, to prevent the capture of certain of their friends or companions, or to rescue them if arrested. Previous to this transaction, so far as we are informed, no attempt had been made to arrest fugitives in the neighborhood under the new act of Congress by a public officer. Heretofore arrests had been made by the owner in person, or his agent properly authorized, or by an officer of the law. Individuals without any authority, but incited by cupidity, and the hope of obtaining the reward offered for the return of a fugitive, had heretofore under- taken to seize them by force and violence, to invade the sanctity of private dwellings at night, and insult the feeling and prejudices of the people. It is not to be wondered at that a people subject to such inroads, should consider odious the perpetrators of such deeds and denominate them kidnappers-and that the subjects of this treatment should have been encouraged in resisting such aggressions, where the rightful claimant could not be distinguished from the odious kidnapper, or the fact be ascertained whether the person seized, deported or stolen in this manner, was a free man or a slave. But the existence of such feelings is no evidence of a determination or conspiracy by the people to publicly resist any legislation of Congress, or levy war against the United States. That in consequence of such excitement, such an outrage should have been committed, is deeply to be deplored. That the persons engaged in it are guilty of aggravated riot and murder cannot be denied. But riot and murder are offences against the State Government. It would be a dangerous precedent for the Court and jury in this case to extend the crime of treason by construction to doubtful cases.”

It took the jury 15 minutes to find Hanway "Not Guilty."
Changed thanks for the addition!
 
Top