Greetings! 11th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment - Photos, suggestions, please!

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Pr Palmer

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I'm fairly new to CWT. As my profile signature indicates, I have two ancestors who served in the Union army - both of them volunteered in the 11th Iowa regiment (Company E). Part of General Crocker's Iowa Brigade. I've already purchased Downing's Civil War diary, which has been giving me a great deal of insight of what my ancestors experienced. I also obtained copies of my gr-gr-grandfather's records from National Archives. I had no idea I had any ancestors who served until very recently, so this is a really exciting journey for me.
What I'm most interested in now is locating any photos of the 11th Iowa - either before their deployment or a reunion get together. So far, no luck.
I've already reached out to the Iowa State Historical Society. Nothing there. Will be reaching out to some Iowa county historical associations next.
Any suggestions welcome!
 

Seduzal

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Welcome to CWT from the Smoky Mountain side of North Carolina. If you can post their names on this page or any other information on them, someone will be along shortly to help you.
 

Pr Palmer

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James Rankin, Private, 11th Iowa Volunteer Infantry - Company E (great-great grandfather)
Ebenezer Rankin, Corporal, 11th Iowa Volunteer Infantry - Company E (great-great-great uncle)

Their parents emigrated from Ireland in the mid 1800's, and settled in northwestern Iowa. When James' 3 year enlistment papers were up, he re-enlisted at Vickburg.
 
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Eleventh Iowa Infantry. — Cols., Abraham M. Hare, William Hall; Lieut.-Cols., William Hall, John C. Abercrombie, Charles Foster, Benjamin Beach; Majs., John C. Abercrombie, Charles Foster, John C. Marven. This regiment was organized at Camp McClellan, near Davenport, and was mustered in at different dates from Sept. 28 to Oct. 18, 1861. It left the state on Nov. 16 for St. Louis and was the first regiment to leave Iowa fully uniformed. It accompanied an expedition to Boonville in December and captured a large amount of gunpowder. Two similar movements closed the season's work for the regiment. Five companies moved to the town of California, the others to Fulton and passed the winter at these places. On March 10, 1862, the regiment moved to Pittsburg landing where it was brigaded with Col. Richard Oglesby's command. It took part at Shiloh and lost over 200 in killed and wounded, more than 30 being killed outright, and Maj. Abercrombie was severely wounded. Its brigade at that battle was commanded by Col. Hare. It took part in the movement upon Corinth and formed part of the garrison there after its evacuation until ordered to Bolivar, Tenn., with its brigade some three months later, from which place it made several expeditions and participated in a battle near there. Returning to Corinth it participated in the battle in October; afterward moved into central Mississippi with Grant; returned to Holly Springs; proceeded thence to Lafayette, Memphis and Young's point; and in February to Lake Providence where it assisted in digging the canal between that point and the river. Col. Hall, who had succeeded Col. Hare on the latter's resignation, was placed in command of the brigade, and Lieut. -Col. Abercrombie took command of the regiment. After Vicksburg's surrender it went into camp. It accompanied the expedition to Monroe, from the effects of which half the command were worn out, with little return for the hardships sustained. In Feb., 1864, the regiment joined in the Meridian raid. Nearly all of the men having reenlisted as veterans, they were given furlough home in the early spring. On the return the regiment joined Sherman's army at Acworth, Ga. It fought at Kennesaw mountain, took part in the operations at Nickajack creek, and from there to Atlanta was constantly engaged in skirmishing. At Atlanta it was heavily engaged in July and it fought at Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station, losing during the campaign 218 in killed and wounded — one half of its available strength. Maj. Foster died from the effects of wounds received at Atlanta. It proceeded to Savannah with the army; sailed from there to Beaufort, S. C, in Jan., 1865; took part in the march through the Carolinas; was engaged in several minor affairs and at the battle of Bentonville; moved to Goldsboro and Raleigh; took part in the grand review at Washington, and was mustered out at Louisville in July, 1865. Its original strength was 931; gain by recruits, 91; total, 1,022.
 
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James Rankin, Private, 11th Iowa Volunteer Infantry - Company E (great-great grandfather)
Ebenezer Rankin, Corporal, 11th Iowa Volunteer Infantry - Company E (great-great-great uncle)

Their parent emigrated from Ireland in the mid 1800's, and settled in northwestern Iowa. When James' 3 year enlistment papers were up, he re-enlisted at Vickburg.
Comrade of your ancestors from Company E

P1674000.gif


John Lett from Tipton, Iowa. age 19, enlisted 9/21/1861 as a private. On 10/15/1861 he mustered into Company E 11th Iowa Infantry. Reenlisted 1/1/1864. promoted to Corporal 1/1/1865. Mustered out at Louisville, Ky. 7/15/1865.
 
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Chris Wimmer

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Andrew J. Bridger and his family - Post War photo - note he proudly wears his GAR ribbon and medal....
Residence Tipton, Iowa, Mustered March 3, 1864. Discharged for disability May 25, 1865 Davenport Iowa. Nativity West Virginia.
11th Iowa Infantry, Company E

Andrew Bridger and Family, enhanced photo.jpg
 
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I'm fairly new to CWT. As my profile signature indicates, I have two ancestors who served in the Union army - both of them volunteered in the 11th Iowa regiment (Company E). Part of General Crocker's Iowa Brigade. I've already purchased Downing's Civil War diary, which has been giving me a great deal of insight of what my ancestors experienced. I also obtained copies of my gr-gr-grandfather's records from National Archives. I had no idea I had any ancestors who served until very recently, so this is a really exciting journey for me.
What I'm most interested in now is locating any photos of the 11th Iowa - either before their deployment or a reunion get together. So far, no luck.
I've already reached out to the Iowa State Historical Society. Nothing there. Will be reaching out to some Iowa county historical associations next.
Any suggestions welcome!
Welcome! Here's some reports from the OR. Good luck in your research!



Shiloh after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. William Hall, Eleventh Iowa Infantry.

HDQRS. ELEVENTH REGT. IOWA VOLUNTEERS, April 9, 1862.
SIR: A have the honor to report the part taken by the Eleventh Regt.
Iowa Volunteers in the action of the 6th and 7th instant as follows:
At between 7 and 8 a. m. on the 6th instant I received orders from you
to form my regiment, consisting of an aggregate of 750 officers and
men, and march them in close column about 200 yards to the front and
there await orders, which I did. In about half an hour I received orders
from you to march about one-fourth of a mile to the left and there form
as a reserve. On arriving at the place indicated I immediately deployed
in line of battle. In a very few moments I received orders from
Maj.-Gen. McClernand to advance to the front, which I did at a
double-quick for a distance of over a quarter of a mile, my right resting
on a pond and supporting Dresser's battery, my left resting along a road
and on another battery. I had scarcely got into position before the enemy
appeared on force, and I opened fire immediately, throwing them into
confusion. They soon reformed and opened on me a very destructive
fire of musketry and artillery, which I sustained for nearly two hours,
during which time my loss in killed and wounded was very severe.
Maj. Abercrombie, who commanded the right with and who rendered
me the most gallant and efficient aid, here received a severe wound in
the head, which necessitated his retiring from the field, remaining,
however, during the time above mentioned. My horse was here shot
under me, and I received while on foot a slight wound in my left ankle.
A large force of the enemy appearing on my right and apparently
endeavoring to turn it, I received orders to retire, which I did, forming
about 100 yards from the left of the regimental parade ground with
Companies A, B, C, E, G, H, and K, the left wing and Company C
retiring in good order. Companies D, F, and I, while retiring, were
exposed to a most galling fire of artillery and musketry, which sweep
the open space through which they had to go, and were thrown into
confusion and did not form. I immediately received orders from
Maj.-Gen. McClernand to take my position about 50 yards in
advance, where I remained under cover for a short time until the enemy
approached quite close, I fired and advanced at doublequick, driving
them before me and capturing a standard from the enemy.

When about 50 yards in the rear of my position, supporting Dresser's
battery, in the morning, I received report from the commanders of
companies that the men were out of ammunition, which fact I
immediately reported to Maj.-Gen. McClernand in person, and held
my position until I was re-enforced, when I received orders from
Gen. McClernand to retire and procure ammunition. Before I issued
the order to retire the troops ordered to occupy my ground broke in
confusion, throwing my men into temporary disorder, but they rallied
and formed at my camp, where I learned that my ammunition had been
taken to the river half an hour before, and I could not learn, after
repeated inquiries, where I could procure any, and the fire becoming
very hot, I retired until I received ammunition, and was joined by part
of Companies D, F, and I. While issuing ammunition I received orders
from Maj.-Gen. Grant to advance immediately, and
ordering Companies B and C, who were armed with rifles and were
then unable to procure cartridges of a suitable caliber, to remain until
they procured them and rejoin the regiment, I immediately moved
forward, taking the first road to the left, until I found a line, and formed
on its right, opening fire on the enemy, where I remained until ordered
to retire and form on the left of a battery of heavy guns placed behind
corn sacks. I held that position until I received orders from Gen.
Grant to advance and deployed skirmishers and feel of the enemy. I
advanced some hundred yards or more, deploying Company A, Capt.
Grant, with instructions to find the enemy, and remained until the
batteries in my rear opened fire, when I returned to the rear of the
batteries, and remained until ordered to advance and support a battery
placed on the left of the heavy guns before mentioned. Here I detailed
12 men from Company G and ordered them to take charge of two
12-pounder howitzers which I found without officers or men, and which
they used with good effect. I remained in this position until the enemy
were repulsed and during the night.

On the morning of the 7th I received orders from Gen. Grant to
move out on the main road leading from the river and to take the first
road leading to the left, and to advance until I found the line. After
marching about a mile and a half I found a heavy gun which was
playing upon the enemy. Immediately formed on its left in support and
remained until ordered to move to the right and front, where I formed
in line of battle, when I received orders from Gen. Hurlbut to
advance and deploy skirmishers to the left and front. I immediately
advanced, deploying Company B to the left and Company A to the
front. The firing after some time becoming more remote, I recalled my
skirmishers and remained in line of battle until ordered to return to my
camp.

With but few individual exceptions all my officers and men conducted
themselves with the greatest gallantry. I make special mention of
Capt. John C. Marven, of Company K, who rose from a sick bed, not
having been able to do duty for ninety days.

Respectfully submitted.

WILLIAM HALL,
Lieut.-Col. Eleventh Regt. Iowa Volunteers, Comdg.

Lieut. C. CADLE, Jr.,
A. A. A. G., First Brig., First Div., Army of the Tennessee.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

***********************************************************************************

Report of Maj. Charles Foster, Eleventh Iowa Infantry.

CAMP ELEVENTH IOWA INFANTRY,
Near Fox's Plantation, June 29, 1863.
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith the following report of the
action of my command this day at Messinger's Ferry:

In accordance with your orders and instructions, received of Col.
Alexander Chambers, I marched at 10 a.m. With four companies Eleventh
Iowa Infantry, viz, Companies F, G, H, and I; a small squad of the
Eleventh Illinois Cavalry (Gen. McArthur's body guard in part), and
two pieces of the Tenth Ohio Battery, under Lieut. Newcomb, to Big
Black River, near the old Messenger's Ferry. (on our arrival we found
the enemy's cavalry pickets posted behind an old corn-crib near the
crossing on the eastern side of the river, and also in the timber beyond
and to the left of the corn-crib, in numbers nearly equal to our own
force. Our cavalry and Company F, of the infantry, were deployed as
skirmishers at once near the bank of the river, and our artillery planted
on the hill, about one-third of a mile to the rear of the infantry, and
after some skirmishing, with the aid of well-directed shots from the
artillery, we drove the enemy back from their first position, and I saw
nothing of them after 4 p.m. At 5 p.m. I sent back all our force, save
two companies of infantry, to induce the enemy to cross over to us if
possible, having first concealed the two Companies, but in vain. At 6 p.m.
We returned to camp without any loss. The officers and men of my command
all behaved well.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FOSTER,
Maj., Commanding.

Lieut. O. D. KINSMAN,
Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Brig., Sixth Div., Seventeenth A. C.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 304-37 MISSISSIPPI, WEST TENNESSEE, ETC. [CHAP. XXXVI.
[Series I. Vol. 24. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 37.]

****************************************************************************************


Reports of Col. William Hall, Eleventh Iowa
Infantry, of expedition to Meridian.

HDQRS. ELEVENTH IOWA INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS,
March 6, 1864.
SIR: In reply to circular of this date I have the honor to reply:

First. Number of miles marched, 340.

Second. Number of miles of railroad track destroyed, 2. No bridges or
trestle-work destroyed.

Third. Number of killed, wounded, and missing, none; number of
veterans mustered in, 316; number enlisted to be mustered in, 40; total,
356.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. HALL,
Col. Eleventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Cmdg.

Capt. JOHN C. MARVEN,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

-----

HDQRS. ELEVENTH IOWA INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS,
Vicksburg, Miss., March 6, 1864.
SIR: In compliance with circular of March 5, I have the honor to report
that there was destroyed by this command, under orders, during the late
expedition, at Morton, Miss., about 1 miles of railroad track, together
with railroad buildings at that place, and at Canton, Miss., about 1 mile
of railroad track.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
WM. HALL,
Col. Eleventh Iowa Infantry Vols., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. JOHN C. MARVEN,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 223-57 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLIV.
[Series I. Vol. 32. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 57.]

************************************************************************************

Report of Lieut. Col. John C. Abercrombie, Eleventh Iowa Infantry,
of operations July 22.

CAMP ELEVENTH REGT. INFANTRY IOWA VET. VOLS.,
In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., July 24, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to report the part taken by this regiment
in the action of the 22d instant:

At 12.30 p. m. the enemy attacked us in our intrenched position,
driving in the pickets in our front, right, and left. The fire became
heavy on our left, while the enemy was found closing in on both
flanks. Our line being curved we were receiving a heavy cross-fire,
when the order came to move by the right flank. Moving to the
right about 300 yards, we halted and crossed to the other side of our
line of breast-works, engaging the enemy. This movement was executed
from time to time as a shelter against the advancing columns
of the enemy, until reaching the first line of works facing south,
which were held, and the enemy forced back. At this line of works
seven companies of the regiment, by order, lay until the morning of the
23d. The holding of the small fort on the hill and the immediate
line of works connected with it, was the duty assigned to me in connection
with another regiment (Fourteenth Wisconsin). Being relieved
in the morning, I reported with the regiment at brigade
headquarters. At the time of the attack upon us three companies
(D, E, and F) were on picket duty to our right and front, also 4 commissioned
officers and 100 men on fatigue duty, absent from the regiment,
leaving about 200 men present. Most of those absent joined
us during the action.

It is highly gratifying to report that the officers and men of the
regiment did their duty gallantly and faithfully throughout. I
would mention, as among those entitled to favorable notice, Capt.
John W. Anderson, who, with a part of his company and a number
of scattering men, successfully held the inside of the small fort on
the hill while the enemy were on the outside in strong force. I
think I may say that to him and the men with him is due, to a great
extent, the holding of that work, to lose which would have been
disaster to us. To First Lieut. and Actg. Adjt. B. W. Prescott I am
greatly indebted for gallant and efficient services in getting together
the various companies and details as they joined the regiment from
various directions after the attack was made upon us, and for faithful
service throughout the day and night. Many acts of bravery
were performed by officers and men of the regiment which might be
mentioned did time and opportunity permit.

Maj. Charles Foster was wounded early in the action, faithfully
in discharge of his duties. Capt. Neal was killed instantly by
grape-shot late in the afternoon at the fort. Capt. Barr is missing.
Capt. Rose missing; supposed to have been wounded and
captured. First Lieut. Cassell missing. First Lieut.
Caldwell killed. First Lieut. Pfoutz wounded. Second Lieutenant
Wylie wounded while gallantly in discharge of his duty.

I would make honorable mention of Sergt. Maj. John G. Safley,
who with First Sergt. John A. Buck, K Company (afterward
killed, brave fellow), with a party of picked up men, numbering
thirty or forty, made a dash over the works held by the rebels,
bringing back more than their own number as prisoners, amongst
whom were a colonel and a captain. In the sally Safley was
wounded, but not believed to be serious.

During the action a Confederate flag was captured and brought
over the works by Private Haworth, of Company. B, now in his
possession; also, a banner belonging to the Forty-fifth Alabama
was brought over by Private Siberts, of Company G, which was
placed by him in the hands of Lieut. Safely, provost-marshal
of the brigade. During the action I sent to the rear 93 prisoners
under guard.

A corrected list* of casualties is herewith transmitted.

Commissioned officers, 8; enlisted men, 129.

J. C. ABERCROMBIE,
Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. O. D. KINSMAN,
A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 4th Division, 17th Army Corps.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE. PAGE 599-74
[Series I. Vol. 38. Part III, Reports. Serial No. 74.]
 
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Attached is a picture of my 3rd Great Grandfather Elias G. Jackson. Elias was a 2nd Lt. in Company F of the 11th Iowa Infantry at the time of his resignation in August of 1863. The attached picture is believed to be from February of 1863.
EliasG.Jackson.jpg
 
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This is a portrait of Isaac N. Carr who was also in Company F. of the 11th Iowa. This image was taken in Savannah, GA in late 1864 or very early 1865. If you look closely at his hat you can see the 17th Corps Badge arrow.
Isaac Carr Portrait.jpg
 
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