Discussion Grant's Class of 1843 at West Point

trice

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May 2, 2006
Class RankCadetCivil WarHighest RankNote
1William Buell FranklinUnionMajor General
2George DeshonFirst LieutenantResigned 1851, ordained a Priest,
3Thomas J. BreretonCaptainResigned 1858, became an oilman
4John H. GrelaudCaptainDied on duty at Ft. McRee, Fla., 1857
5William F. RaynoldsUnionColonel
6Isaac Ferdinand QuinbyUnionBrigadier General
7Roswell Sabine RipleyConfederateBrigadier General
8John James PeckUnionMajor General
9John P. JohnstoneFirst LieutenantKilled at Battle of Contretras, 1847
10Joseph Jones ReynoldsUnionMajor General
11James Allen HardieUnionBrigadier GeneralPromotion not confirmed by Senate and revoked
12Henry F. ClarkeUnionColonel
13Jacob J. BookerFirst LieutenantDied on duty, San Antonio, Tex., 1849
14Samuel Gibbs FrenchUnionMajor General
15Theodore L. ChadbourneSecond LieutenantKilled at Resaca de la Palma, 1846
16Christopher Columbus AugurUnionMajor General
17Franklin GardnerUnionMajor General
18George StevensSecond LieutenantDrowned on duty in the Rio Grande, 1846
19Edmunds B. HollowayConfederateColonelKilled near Independence, Mo. May 1861
20Lewis NeillFirst LieutenantDied on duty, Ft. Croghan, Tex., 1850
21Ulysses Simpson GrantUnionLieutenant General
22Joseph Haydn PotterUnionBrigadier General
23Robert HazlittSecond LieutenantKilled at Monterey, 1846
24Edwin HoweSecond LieutenantDied on duty Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., 1850
25Lafayette B. WoodCaptainDied on duty, Washington, 1858
26Charles Smith HamiltonUnionMajor General
27William K. Van BokkelenCaptainCashiered for misapplication of funds 1853
28A. St. Amand CrozetFirst LieutenantDied on sick leave 1855
29Charles E. JarvisFirst LieutenantDied on duty, Sonoma, Cal., 1849
30Frederick SteeleUnionMajor General
31Henry R. SeldenUnionColonelDied of disease at Fort Union, N.M. Feb. 1865
32Rufus IngallsUnionBrigadier General
33Frederick Tracy DentUnionBrigadier General
34John C. McFerranUnionColonel
35Henry Moses JudahUnionBrigadier General
36Norman EltingSecond LieutenantResigned 1846, Became teacher/farmer
37Cave J. CoutsFirst LieutenantResigned 1851, became rancher in CA
38Charles G. MerchantFirst LieutenantDied on duty East Pascagoula, Ms. 1855
39George C. McClellandSecond LieutenantCashiered for drunkeness and conduct 1847
 

Grant's Tomb

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There are only a few names beside Grant I recognize on the list who graduated in his class. Rufus Ingalls who became the chief quartermaster for the Army of the Potomac, William B. Franklin, 6th Corps commander under McClellan, Frederick Dent, his future brother-in-law, and Joseph J. Reynolds. Both Reynolds and Frederick Steele commanded the Union Army of Arkansas that created on July 27 in the wake of the victories at Vicksburg and Helena, Arkansas.
 

67th Tigers

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Nov 10, 2006
Since I typed it out the other day, this is their first assigned regiment:

1st July20th July
FranklinTopo Engrs
DeshonTopo EngrsTransferred to ordnance
Breteton4th ArtyTransferred to ordnance
Grelaud1st Arty
Raynolds5th InfTransferred to topo engrs
Quinby2nd Arty
Ripley3rd Arty
Peck2nd Arty
Johnstone4th Arty
JJ Reynolds4th Arty
Hardie1st Arty
Clarke2nd Arty
Booker1st Inf
French3rd Arty
Chadbourne2nd Inf
Augur2nd Inf
Garnder7th Inf
G StevensRifles
Holloway4th Inf
NeillRifles
Grant4th Inf
Potter1st Inf
Halzitt4th Inf
Howe5th Inf
Wood8th Inf
Hamilton2nd Inf
Bokkelen7th Inf
Crozet7th Inf
Jarvis3rd Inf
Steele2nd Inf
Selden1st Inf
IngallsRifles
Dent6th Inf
McFerran3rd Inf
Judah8th Inf
Elting6th Inf
CoutsRifles
Merchant8th Inf
GC McClelland3rd Inf
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
I really enjoyed reading through these lists and often overlook the fact that Julia's brother was in Grant's West Point Class. I would love to know more about his service both during the CW and after. He went to a different infantry group than Grant it appears and I'm not sure if the two ever fought together. Only two class members seem to have gone to the Confederate side and one was killed very early on in the war. It's just another reminder of how these men were once all classmates and how hard it must have been for some of them to confront eachother on the battle field. My appreciation around the Civil War and its ramifications will never diminish.
 
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Interesting that bottom of the class #39, George C. McClelland, was "[c]ashiered for drunkeness and conduct" during 1847, yet no mention of that here:

"Maj. George Croghan McClelland, son of George and Agnes (Seaton) McClelland, was born in the old 'United States Hotel' at Franklin Nov. 29, 1818-19. Brought up in the pioneer days of this region, he was an enthusiastic hunter in his youth, and it is said that he killed wild turkeys and even deer in the woods about Big Sandy before he was ten years old. After his father's death he began clerking in his uncle's store, being so engaged until 1839, when he received his appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point. He was graduated in July 1843, in a class which had among its members a number of men who achieved military fame, one of his classmates being U. S. Grant. He was assigned to the 3d United States Infantry, as second lieutenant by brevet, and was stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., until 1845, on frontier duty, in the latter year being transferred to Fort Jessup, in Louisiana. He took part in the military occupation of Texas in 1845 and 1846, until his resignation in April, 1846. He had handed in his resignation the 9th of that month, and left the army the 30th, but on his return trip home he learned of the outbreak of the Mexican war and felt it his duty to return to the service. He spent a short time visiting in Pennsylvania, and then went to New Orleans and volunteered, serving almost a year as private and corporal in the 1st Pennsylvania Volunteers, with whom he was at the siege of Vera Cruz, March 9-29, 1847. In a skirmish with the enemy March 25th, while on a scouting expedition with six other men, he and his companions were surrounded by about one hundred and fifty Mexican soldiers who ordered them to lay down their arms. Not a shot was fired until the Mexicans came within about fifteen yards, and then for three quarters of an hour the seven held off the larger number, until the noise attracted the attention of the main force and a regiment was dispatched to their assistance.

One of the seven was killed, and two were wounded. On April 9, 1847, young McClelland was reappointed to the United States army as second lieutenant in the nth Infantry, and did recruiting duty that year as well as field service, being engaged in the defense of Puebla Sept. 13-30. He took an active part in all of Scott's battles, from the siege of Vera Cruz to the capture of Mexico City, and his services were specially mentioned by General Cadwallader in his report on the battle of Molino del Ray as follows: 'The enemy gave way, which result was greatly facilitated by the efficient use of a piece of artillery brought up by Lieutenant McClelland tinder a very heavy fire from the enemy.'

During the Civil war Major McClelland returned to his country's service, raising and organizing a company."

https://ia800201.us.archive.org/26/items/venangocountype00babcgoog/venangocountype00babcgoog.pdf (pg. 325 of the Google document)
 

trice

Lt. Colonel
Joined
May 2, 2006
I really enjoyed reading through these lists and often overlook the fact that Julia's brother was in Grant's West Point Class. I would love to know more about his service both during the CW and after. He went to a different infantry group than Grant it appears and I'm not sure if the two ever fought together. Only two class members seem to have gone to the Confederate side and one was killed very early on in the war. It's just another reminder of how these men were once all classmates and how hard it must have been for some of them to confront eachother on the battle field. My appreciation of the Civil War and its ramifications will never diminish.
Fred Dent served 16 years on the frontier, including Yakima War, and in March 1863 was promoted to Major in the 4th US Infantry, sent to NYC to suppress riots. In March 1864 he was promoted to Lt. Colonel and (surprise!) became an aide-de-camp to Lieutenant General U. S. Grant. Lincoln appointed Dent to be a Brigadier General of Volunteers, ranking from April 5th -- but died before the paperwork was sent to Congress.

New President Andrew Johnson submitted it January 13, 1866 and the Senate confirmed it February 23, 1866. Dent then mustered out of the Volunteers on April 30.

President Johnson then nominated Dent for a Brigadier General brevet in the Regulars, which the Senate confirmed on July 23rd.

Dent became Grant's military secretary when he moved into the White House in 1869, serving until 1873. He commanded Fort Trumbull in CT in 1875 and St. Augustine (FL?) in 1881. Retired in 1883, moved to Washington, DC and then to Denver (where he had a son practicing law).

Died in Denver (December 23, 1892. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Fred Dent served 16 years on the frontier, including Yakima War, and in March 1863 was promoted to Major in the 4th US Infantry, sent to NYC to suppress riots. In March 1864 he was promoted to Lt. Colonel and (surprise!) became an aide-de-camp to Lieutenant General U. S. Grant. Lincoln appointed Dent to be a Brigadier General of Volunteers, ranking from April 5th -- but died before the paperwork was sent to Congress.

New President Andrew Johnson submitted it January 13, 1866 and the Senate confirmed it February 23, 1866. Dent then mustered out of the Volunteers on April 30.

President Johnson then nominated Dent for a Brigadier General brevet in the Regulars, which the Senate confirmed on July 23rd.

Dent became Grant's military secretary when he moved into the White House in 1869, serving until 1873. He commanded Fort Trumbull in CT in 1875 and St. Augustine (FL?) in 1881. Retired in 1883, moved to Washington, DC and then to Denver (where he had a son practicing law).

Died in Denver (December 23, 1892. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Thank you for providing all that wonderful information. I overlooked so much with my focus on Grant and he was with Grant during the war. He remained a military man throughout his life, and I imagine he and Grant were always close, regardless of his marriage to Julia, although that certainly sealed their lifelong bond. I'm sure Fred Dent could not imagine where life would take them both when he first introduced his friend Ulysses to his sister Julia as a young cadet. Fortunately they both survived the wars they were involved in. I'm really appreciative of that rundown once again.
 

Grant's Tomb

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I really enjoyed reading through these lists and often overlook the fact that Julia's brother was in Grant's West Point Class. I would love to know more about his service both during the CW and after. He went to a different infantry group than Grant it appears and I'm not sure if the two ever fought together. Only two class members seem to have gone to the Confederate side and one was killed very early on in the war. It's just another reminder of how these men were once all classmates and how hard it must have been for some of them to confront eachother on the battle field. My appreciation of the Civil War and its ramifications will never diminish.
Grant was urged to get acquainted with the Dent family because Frederick had been posted to Fort Towson, a frontier post on the Red River. Since Grant was stationed with the 4th Infantry at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis which was only 5 miles from the family's estate White Haven, Grant accepted their hospitality in Frederick's absence.
 
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Grant was urged to get acquainted with the Dent family because Frederick had been posted to Fort Towson, a frontier post on the Red River. Since Grant was stationed with the 4th Infantry at Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis which was only 5 miles from the family's estate White Haven, Grant accepted their hospitality in Frederick's absence.
Another great little snippet to add to Grant's story @Grant's Tomb . I'm sure his presence was reassuring to the family when they were likely missing their own son very much. And it certainly proved a bonus for Grant and Julia in terms of them getting to know eachother better.
 

trice

Lt. Colonel
Joined
May 2, 2006
Interesting, Bokkelen was reassigned to the 7th Infantry after being cashiered in 1853 for misapplication of funds. I guess the quartermaster's department would have been out of the question.
Lubliner.
On further research, Bokkelen was in the Army until 1861. He left the field service in 1853 for the Recruiting Service, and then actually did move to the Quartermasters, which looks to be how he got cashiered. This is from Cullum's Register. His full name seems to have been William Kemble Van Bokkelena.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1839, to July 1, 1843, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 7th Infantry, July 1, 1843.

Served: in garrison at Ft. Pike, La., 1843, — Ft. Morgan, Ala., 1843, — Pensacola harbor, Fla., 1843‑44, — Baton Rouge, La., 1844‑45, — and ​

(Second Lieut., 3d Infantry, Nov. 26, 1845)​
Ft. Pickens, Fla., 1845; in Military Occupation of Texas, 1845‑46; in the

(Transferred to 7th Infantry, June 27, 1846)​
War with Mexico, 1846; on Recruiting service, 1846‑47; in the War with Mexico, 1847‑48, being engaged in the Battle of Contreras,

(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)​
Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — and Operations before and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; as Quartermaster, 7th Infantry, Jan. 17, 1848, to Sep. 10, 1850; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848‑49; in Florida Hostilities against the Seminole Indians, 1849‑50; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1850, — Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.,

(First Lieut., 7th Infantry, July 16, 1850, to Jan. 2, 1858)​
1850, — and Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1850‑51; on frontier duty at Ft. Washita, I. T., 1851‑52; on Recruiting service, 1852‑53; and on Quartermaster
(Captain, Staff — Asst. Quartermaster, July 28, 1853)​
duty, in the Quartermaster-General's office, Washington, D. C., 1853, — Tampa Bay, Fla., 1853‑54, — Texas, 1854‑57, — Florida Hostilities, 1857‑58, — and Ft. Union, N. M., 1858‑61.

Cashiered, May 8, 1861, for Misapplication of $225 of Public Funds.​

Civil History. — In Mercantile pursuits, New York city, since 18??​

Died March 25, 1907, at Brooklyn, N. Y.: Aged 85.​

Buried, Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY.
 

Lubliner

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On further research, Bokkelen was in the Army until 1861. He left the field service in 1853 for the Recruiting Service, and then actually did move to the Quartermasters, which looks to be how he got cashiered. This is from Cullum's Register. His full name seems to have been William Kemble Van Bokkelena.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1839, to July 1, 1843, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Bvt. Second Lieut., 7th Infantry, July 1, 1843.

Served: in garrison at Ft. Pike, La., 1843, — Ft. Morgan, Ala., 1843, — Pensacola harbor, Fla., 1843‑44, — Baton Rouge, La., 1844‑45, — and ​

(Second Lieut., 3d Infantry, Nov. 26, 1845)​
Ft. Pickens, Fla., 1845; in Military Occupation of Texas, 1845‑46; in the

(Transferred to 7th Infantry, June 27, 1846)​
War with Mexico, 1846; on Recruiting service, 1846‑47; in the War with Mexico, 1847‑48, being engaged in the Battle of Contreras,

(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)​
Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — and Operations before and Capture of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; as Quartermaster, 7th Infantry, Jan. 17, 1848, to Sep. 10, 1850; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848‑49; in Florida Hostilities against the Seminole Indians, 1849‑50; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1850, — Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.,

(First Lieut., 7th Infantry, July 16, 1850, to Jan. 2, 1858)​
1850, — and Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1850‑51; on frontier duty at Ft. Washita, I. T., 1851‑52; on Recruiting service, 1852‑53; and on Quartermaster
(Captain, Staff — Asst. Quartermaster, July 28, 1853)​
duty, in the Quartermaster-General's office, Washington, D. C., 1853, — Tampa Bay, Fla., 1853‑54, — Texas, 1854‑57, — Florida Hostilities, 1857‑58, — and Ft. Union, N. M., 1858‑61.

Cashiered, May 8, 1861, for Misapplication of $225 of Public Funds.​

Civil History. — In Mercantile pursuits, New York city, since 18??​

Died March 25, 1907, at Brooklyn, N. Y.: Aged 85.​

Buried, Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, NY.
Thank you for the rundown. It seems the army lost a good man right at the beginning of the Civil War.
Lubliner.
 

Tom Elmore

2nd Lieutenant
Member of the Year
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Jan 16, 2015
I really enjoyed reading through these lists and often overlook the fact that Julia's brother was in Grant's West Point Class. I would love to know more about his service both during the CW and after. He went to a different infantry group than Grant it appears and I'm not sure if the two ever fought together. Only two class members seem to have gone to the Confederate side and one was killed very early on in the war. It's just another reminder of how these men were once all classmates and how hard it must have been for some of them to confront eachother on the battle field. My appreciation around the Civil War and its ramifications will never diminish.
Just now reading American Ulysses, and no mention is made of Fred Dent during the Civil War, but they did fight together during the Mexican War. Grant saw him daily there, and came upon Fred just after he was wounded. Grant examined the wound and judged it to be not serious, so he hoisted Fred up on a rampart where he would receive prompt medical attention.
 

trice

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Just now reading American Ulysses, and no mention is made of Fred Dent during the Civil War, but they did fight together during the Mexican War. Grant saw him daily there, and came upon Fred just after he was wounded. Grant examined the wound and judged it to be not serious, so he hoisted Fred up on a rampart where he would receive prompt medical attention.
Fred Dent spent 16 years on the frontier. In 1863, he ended up a Major sent to New York to suppress riots. In March, 1864 he becomes an aide-de-camp to Grant. In 1869-73 he is President Grant's military secretary.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
Just now reading American Ulysses, and no mention is made of Fred Dent during the Civil War, but they did fight together during the Mexican War. Grant saw him daily there, and came upon Fred just after he was wounded. Grant examined the wound and judged it to be not serious, so he hoisted Fred up on a rampart where he would receive prompt medical attention.
Hi Tom, I feel like I may have read of that incident with Fred in Ulysses memoirs and need to go back and take another look now that you mention it. Thanks for reminding me. I haven't read American Ulysses. How are you enjoying it?
 

Tom Elmore

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Hi Tom, I feel like I may have read of that incident with Fred in Ulysses memoirs and need to go back and take another look now that you mention it. Thanks for reminding me. I haven't read American Ulysses. How are you enjoying it?
It's a rather good read and I've learned a few new things about Grant, the Dents and even Lincoln. Years ago I read Grant's memoirs.
 

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