"Granny" Franklin's boys killed


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Zella

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#42
Zella, thanks for the welcome. I'd be interested in your suspicions of Slagle's claims. Maybe I can help convince you. He is me!
I think it was about pre-war bad blood between the major figures in the massacre. I don't doubt the power of mountain feuds--my western NC family could win Olympic gold medals for grudges :D--but I was never quite clear of the sources used to support those claims. Thank you very much for being willing to address this! It was my only qualm with any of the interviews I've ever read with you about the massacres.
 
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#44
I think it was about pre-war bad blood between the major figures in the massacre. I don't doubt the power of mountain feuds--my western NC family could win Olympic gold medals for grudges :D--but I was never quite clear of the sources used to support those claims. Thank you very much for being willing to address this! It was my only qualm with any of the interviews I've ever read with you about the massacres.
Curious - where have you read the interviews? 'Bad blood" - was that involving Keith - Merrimon and/or others? I talk too much!
 

Zella

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#45
One was called blood in the valley. The other was called massacre in Madison.

And yes I think so about Keith and merriman. At least it was about everyone hating each other before the war. Like I said, I could definitely see it happening. Just curious about the sources. :smile:
 

Zella

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#47
Ignore the massacre in Madison one. That just talks about the sheriff killing! I can see how that didnt help matters. :D

I think East Tennessee Roots, tnfed, ccmdusa, and I have identified about 4 different sheriff killings in the mountains during the war!
 

TnFed

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#48
Lol, I sort of thought you might be Daniel Slagle when you posted that you were all about sources. I remember an interview you gave sometime back, when you stated you were a researcher not a reader. That and your knowledge on the Shelton Laurel. Welcome aboard!! TnFed.
 

Zella

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#49
Lol, I sort of thought you might be Daniel Slagle when you posted that you were all about sources. I remember an interview you gave sometime back, when you stated you were a researcher not a reader. That and your knowledge on the Shelton Laurel. Welcome aboard!! TnFed.
:laugh: I think that's the one I just linked to. It's a small world on the internet!
 

CSA Today

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#50
The link above is a great work by Arthur Paul Shelton dated 1987. What were his sources for the Norton boys being killed and the massacre? Wellman's The Kingdom of Madison and Paludan's Victims. Below is a short article running down sources:

September 9, 2004

For Madison County, NC Genealogical Society newsletter:



Greetings fellow researchers! I hope this newsletter finds you all doing well. Writing a little column for this publication is just about one of the hardest things for me to do. What do I write about? Last night's browsing a few genealogy pages on the internet answered that question for me.



How many of us, while researching our families, have come across some great family information we had never seen or heard before? The information could have come from a book, newspaper article, census record, birth or death record, family tradition story, or any other source--- and it fit in exactly with what we would have expected. We included this great find in our genealogy! But wait! Did we consider that this new and exciting piece of information might not be true or accurate? It probably cannot be stressed enough that we should always try to verify the accuracy of what we find. We should always strive to identify the source of the information, and even further than that; we should consider what the background, knowledge, and intent was of the author. If we do a little diggin', we just may find that the story is not quite as accurate as we had thought. One good example follows.



There is a story of widow Nance Franklin and her sons in THE KINGDOM OF MADISON: A SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN FASTNESS AND ITS PEOPLE,by Manly Wade Wellman, 1973. According to the story, three of Nance's sons, Balus, James, and Josiah Franklin were Confederate sympathizers, at home with their mother, when they were killed by George Kirk's Union men in 1864. Before Josiah's death, he had killed two of the "bluecoats". One of the soldiers even fired a shot toward Nance, and "his bullet snipped a lock of her flying hair." The Union soldiers also burned Nance Franklin's home. Manly's sources of the event were oral tradition, "widespread and consistent." He names as sources; Bascom Lamar Lunsford, Obray Ramsey, Mrs. Rilla Ray, and Byard Ray.



We find basically the same story in BUSHWHACKERS: THE CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CAROLINA-THE MOUNTAINS, by William R. Trotter, 1988. Trotter does not give his source for this particular story, but it is evident he had read THE KINGDOM OF MADISON. He had also read the book by Phillip Shaw Paludan (discussed below), as he cited Paludan's work numerous times.



Wow, what a great story to include in a genealogy work-to be preserved for future generations! After all, it is included in a couple of well known author's books. It must be true! But now after finding this exciting piece of information, we do a little diggin', and find a few other very important bits of information.



The story of Nance and her boys is retold by Phillip Shaw Paludan in his 1981 book, VICTIMS: A TRUE STORY OF THE CIVIL WAR. Paludan lists his source: "Wellman, Kingdom of Madison, 88-89, 94-95; story repeated during interview April 4, 1977, by Mrs. Shelton, who insists that Nance Franklin was not the Confederate sympathizer that Wellman says she was." Ahhhh-haaa! Mrs. Shelton gives us the first indication that our story may not be accurate!



Nancy Franklin filed for a pension in 1875. Her pension file is a great source of information, and proves Mrs. Shelton to be correct. The following information is gleaned from her pension application to the United States government:

Nancy was first married to Drury Norton. Drury died, and about five years before the war, she married George Franklin. Nancy's sons were by Drury Norton, so they were Nortons, not Franklins. Nancy says, "Bayliss, James, and Josiah were killed by the Rebels sometime in Sept 1864." She also states, ".... they were soldiers in the U. S. Army. Bayliss and James belonged to Co. E 2d N.C. Mtd. Infy. Josiah belonged to Co. G, 3d N.C. Mtd. Infy. This is as near as I can remember. They were killed while visiting me, in Township No. Madison Co., N.C. by the Rebels, who surprized them. I heard the shooting and I saw them after they were dead. They were all buried in one grave without a coffin. I did not see them actually shot down. I couldn't see it done."

The pension office agent had the following to say about Nancy Franklin: "Nancy Franklin is perhaps one of the most remarkable women of the war. If one half of the stories told about her are true she must have been a real heroine. There can be no question raised as to her loyalty to the Union during all the war. After her three sons were murdered she became desperate and was one of the most efficient spies in the whole Union Army. She is a thoroughly immoral woman however and is certainly a hard case."



Service records of Balus, James, and Josiah verify that they were in the United States Army, as stated above. Balus could have also been the Balis Norton who served in the 29th North Carolina Infantry (Confederate), previous to serving in the Union Army.



Now which versions of the story are true???? Were the Norton boys Confederate or Union soldiers? Did someone really shoot at Nancy and "snip a lock of her flying hair"? I'll place my bet on the documented evidence from the pension file and service records; not on "widespread and consistent" oral tradition--even though published in at least 3 books. Thank you Mr. Paludan and Mrs. Shelton for leading us to question those published accounts!



WHEN YOU FIND A GREAT STORY, DO A LITTLE MORE DIGGIN'. THE STORY MAY CHANGE.



© Dan Slagle, 2004


It's from a Shelton family history. The Sheltons being perhaps the most prominent residents of Shelton Laurel, I am inclined to take Arthur Paul Shelton's word for it over that of the mysterious Dan Slagle who offered no sources at all.

Who exactly is Dan Slagle? If Slagle read Trotter at all he is being disingenuous, Trotter never said Granny Franklin was pro-Confederate before her three sons were killed by Kirk's men. From page 135: “It was typical of the confused and tangled loyalties of the region that although Granny Franklin had four sons that sniped for the Confederacy, she herself inclined toward the Union... at least, until the day Kirk's Unionists paid her a visit.”
 
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#51
Lol, I sort of thought you might be Daniel Slagle when you posted that you were all about sources. I remember an interview you gave sometime back, when you stated you were a researcher not a reader. That and your knowledge on the Shelton Laurel. Welcome aboard!! TnFed.
Thanks. I think you meant to write researcher not a writer. I hate trying to write something, but love digging deep in documents. Source is Key. Good to be here!
 

TnFed

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#52
Thanks. I think you meant to write researcher not a writer. I hate trying to write something, but love digging deep in documents. Source is Key. Good to be here!
Good to have you. My basic interest lies a little south to the Cherokee County area of NC.
 
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#54
One was called blood in the valley. The other was called massacre in Madison.

And yes I think so about Keith and merriman. At least it was about everyone hating each other before the war. Like I said, I could definitely see it happening. Just curious about the sources. :smile:
I remember the article, but don't remember that I mentioned folks hating each other. I did wonder what might have transpired between Keith and Merrimon, and did suggest a possibility of Merrimon's revenge. Source for the legal transaction between the two was Madison Co. Court records.
 
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#57
Did'nt Merrimon represent one of Keith's brothers in some kind of monetary settlement and then had trouble collecting his fee?
You may be referring to the situation mentioned in the article Zella posted above. In that situation, Keith's deceased brother had owed 4 lawyers for services. The 4 appointed Merrimon to collect their money from what Keith's deceased brother would have gotten from the estate settlement of the Keith brothers' deceased father. And guess who the father's estate executor was - yep. . . James Keith. Did Merrimon collect the money from Keith? Would a non-collection cause friction between the two? I can't answer that for sure. Leads one to wonder. If that's not what you refer to, please tell me more.
 

TnFed

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#58
You may be referring to the situation mentioned in the article Zella posted above. In that situation, Keith's deceased brother had owed 4 lawyers for services. The 4 appointed Merrimon to collect their money from what Keith's deceased brother would have gotten from the estate settlement of the Keith brothers' deceased father. And guess who the father's estate executor was - yep. . . James Keith. Did Merrimon collect the money from Keith? Would a non-collection cause friction between the two? I can't answer that for sure. Leads one to wonder. If that's not what you refer to, please tell me more.
That was it. Thank you Sir.
TnFed.
 
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#59
One of my east Tennessee Confederate relatives was James Jefferson Land, (3 x 1st cousin). He migrated to east Tennessee with his widowed mother and two sisters from Wilkes County, NC in the mid-1850's. He served in Company D 63rd Tn Infantry and surrendered at Appomattox. His son, Thomas A. Land (1875-1934) married Tryphena ( Triphonia) Shelton (1875-1931) on Dec. 22, 1896 in Greene County, Tennessee. She was reportedly the 2nd child of Shadrach "Shad" Shelton and Margaret Sams. I believe they were from the Laurel ? I believe Shad's brother, Andrew was one of Kirk's men ?

Reportedly a photo of Margaret Sams Shelton

Margaret Sams Shelton.jpg
 

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