Goodies from the Baltimore Show?

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#21
Congrats. Your trip was worthwhile. That's the barrel you needed to shoot without an armor plated, asbestos suit on !
The mark you posted is a bit "too far gone" and there are at least half a dozen things which could have been under the crown.
Pics of the new Enfield coming up today, if *$#### Windows will leave my computers alone...
If its not too much trouble, I'd like to know what the half-dozen possibilities are...when you can spare the time....no rush. I haven't had a chance to inspect the rest of the gun closely for markings...will do so this weekend.
 

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#23
I'd hit The English Connection in the "Markings" and "long Arms" chapters first; There's a "crown"; over BSAT. SH/C, S/HC/arrow, SH/G1-2-3 or 4, and a few more sometime doubled with one in line with the bore, the other 90 degrees across the stock...
The wood just looks to worn in that area to tell.
Good luck.
OK, will do. I just got the book last week, but havent had a chance to read it. Again, thanks for the help. Yes, the wood is worn in that area, but I will scour the rest of the gun this weekend. I am hoping to find other clues that can unlock the mysteries.
 
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#24
So, nothing particularly special about my Enfield, but I thought I'd post a few pics nonetheless, cuz people love looking at pics. Is the damage to the rear stock consistent with leaning on rocks while shooting??? Can we match up the rock marks with the rocks at the Devils Den?? (I am joking, of course!!). I added a few pics of the lock/hammer. Question....are all the engraved crowns on the lockplate exactly identical or are there subtle differences that identify a particular manufacturer? I haven't taken apart the lock, and someone suggested I shouldn't lest I damage the stock. I was told that the lock is so tightly fitted to the wood, with no gaps, that it suggests the lock has not been removed in a long time, and removing it might damage the wood....what would you recommend? Anything special about the proof marks on the barrel?
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#25
Nice shooter there.

Dings are dings but Devils Den Dings are special.

The "crowns" are stamped and are so similar no one has bothered to look for maker differences. The Birmingham trade was so specialized, I'm sure there was a "stamp and die" family who had been making them for generations. Same for London.

As for pulling the lock, you're correct. They are very tightly inletted. Here's how to do it without taking out a few wood chips from the lock mortice.

Put a couple of drops of Balistol {No, I don't own stock in the company} around the lock screw {2} threads on the lock side, and a bit less around the rim of the slots {around the brass washers} on the left side and let it sit for a few minutes.

Use a screwdriver made for guns {hollow ground} not a Craftsman, etc from Sears. Brownells sells Grace screw drivers and they are a great investment.

Turn the lock screws about 1/2 a turn or less and gently tap the head with soft wood.... do it again, and again, add a tiny more oil to the receding lock threads, keep doing the screw and tap dance again, and again. Work them as a pair, front then rear, etc, etc.. until the lock plate is moving out of its position whilst adjusting the screwing to keep the lock level with the wood around it . More oil around the rim of the lock as it comes out. Screw and tap until it's free.

Now marvel at all the marks and names inside the lock. Keep the screws in the holes they were originally in as they are two different lengths.

The chisled/filed slashes you will find on the bands, lock, barrel, etc are assembly marks unique to that gun. The parts will not interchange with another Enfield, except for some blind luck.

Fun stuff, Eh ?
 
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#26
Lanyard Puller said - "Now marvel at all the marks and names inside the lock".

LOL!!! Are you being sarcastic and/or exercising very dry humour? In my other Enfield I actually did find Tipping & Lawden engraved on the inner lock plate. So, seriously, should I expect to find much info inside the lock? And if the plate is engraved with a makers name, I suspect you will tell me it doesn't mean the entire gun was made by that maker, due top the numerous parts suppliers in Birmingham....am I right?
 
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#27
I was looking at the crown markings (stamped into the stock) shown in The English Connection. Only two specific markings appear as double crowns stamped behind the trigger guard tand. The "Crown over SHC" and the "Crown over SH/G1". Are there any other known marks that would be double-stamped in close proximity? Or is the double-stamping unique to these marks?
 
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#28
While you boys were whooping it up and scoring big in Baltimore, I (and at least one other member of this illustrious group) was at a local show and sometimes you just never know what is going to walk through the door, like a Cook & Brothers Carbine or a primo 7" Rachet Base Brooke Shell from Mobile-you just never know. That said, at least one major show like Baltimore is definitely on my bucket list before I check out.:cannon:
 
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#29
@redbob,......at a local show and sometimes you just never know what is going to walk through the door, like a Cook & Brothers Carbine


If you didn't buy the Cook carbine, I hope you made a note of the, lock marks, serial number, condition, missing parts, etc.
Alabama is certainly the place to find late production Cooks. I hope you got it and will post a few photos.
 
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#30
@redbob,......at a local show and sometimes you just never know what is going to walk through the door, like a Cook & Brothers Carbine


If you didn't buy the Cook carbine, I hope you made a note of the, lock marks, serial number, condition, missing parts, etc.
Alabama is certainly the place to find late production Cooks. I hope you got it and will post a few photos.
I was merely part of a select group that was a party to it's purchase and @ucvrelics.com has assured me that it went to a very good home. I was honored just to have been merely able to hold it.
 
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#31
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I found a marking in the ramrod channel. Looks like J. Sutton. It was only obvious when examining the forestock in sunlight...totally missed it the other night in my workshop. I learned, with the cartouche on my Colt 1860 Army, that things pop into view in sunlight that won't under articial light.
 

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#32
Lanyard Puller said - "Now marvel at all the marks and names inside the lock".

LOL!!! Are you being sarcastic and/or exercising very dry humour? In my other Enfield I actually did find Tipping & Lawden engraved on the inner lock plate. So, seriously, should I expect to find much info inside the lock? And if the plate is engraved with a makers name, I suspect you will tell me it doesn't mean the entire gun was made by that maker, due top the numerous parts suppliers in Birmingham....am I right?
You will be amazed at the markings that will be not only on the inside of the lock-plate but the barrel channel and under the barrel as well. Go ahead and field strip it and let see some photos.
 
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#34
ok thanks UCV...I just looked at the underside of the barrel. Burr manufactured the barrel I guess? Any other useful info from the numbers and initials? The 12 on the barrel is same number as on the rear sight (see pic above) No markings in the wood of the barrel channel...pout.
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#37
Well, its WH actually...my apologies for upside down photos. I looked up WH in The English Connection, but no info. Considering the many thousands employed in the British gun trade, I guess its pretty hard to know all the names associated with the inspection marks.
 
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#39
I know everyone loves pictures, so here are some pics of the other major purchase I made at the show. Nothing particularly special about it (except I think I got a great price) but it looks very special when displayed with the flag as a dramatic backdrop. ;-) Serial # 19xxx, which makes it one of the first few thousand of the 3rd version of the Remington. Therefore, it is "transitional" and has the cone front sight which was soon afterward replaced by the bladed front sight. It does have most of the features of the final version of the New Model Army, such as the exposed barrel threads, safety notches on the cylinder, no slot for the cylinder pin on the rammer (which eliminated problem of cylinder pin sliding forward due to recoil which caused the gun to jam). I haven't taken the time yet to identify the inspector initials on the cartouche.
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#40
Anyone wanna hazard a guess at the initials in this Remington cartouche? There is space for 3 letters, but only the first and last can be seen, and not particularly well. Serial range 19xxx if it helps at all.
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