Goodies from the Baltimore Show?

Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
209
#1
Hi all....does anyone wanna share pictures and/or stories about goodies they may have bought at the Baltimore Show? My son and I attended and picked up a few items. Sorry, no pictures to post yet (got home late yesterday, and been crazy busy ever since). I will post when I get a chance, but it might not be until next week. In the meantime, I'd love to see other people's goodies.

I just want to put out a big thank you to Lanyard Puller, who helped me inspect an Enfield at the show. It was nice to meet you in person, and your tips, advice and technical opinion were greatly appreciated. I am impressed at the depth of your knowledge. I only wish I had more time to chat...alas, I was running around trying to look for goodies...it was my first show of that scale. I wasn't able to even do all the tables! (but between my son and I, we managed to cover it all).

Aside from Lanyard Puller, I met Tim from College Hill Arsenal (who noticed me looking at some Enfield markings pictures on my phone and he proclaimed "hey, that's my website"), and Sam from HorseSoldiers.com (another website I have often visited) who I chatted with as my son and I inspected an Enfield he was selling (which we ultimately bought). I had no idea he ran that website until he casually mentioned it, and was again amazed at how everyone from the "community" seemed to be there.

I must say I was impressed the size and scope of the show. Anyhow, I am hoping to see your goodies ("I'll show you mine if you show me yours") :unsure:
 

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#3
It was certainly my pleasure, and my apologies for being in "hectic" mode on Saturday morning, but 2 things had "walked in" both of which I thought I would never find, and a very fake Confederate revolver was also circulating the aisles. It takes away a lot of searching the aisle time sometimes with dealers, as you saw with the gun we looked at. Glad you got the one from Horse Soldier, they're straight up guys.

You post your goodies first and by then I'll have time to photo and post a couple of mine. Still researching the Enfield, powder flask and sword.
D.
 
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Messages
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#6
Lanyard Puller...since you had already left by the time I spotted the Enfield at the HorseSoldier tables (I swear it wasn't there on the Saturday, and my son says he had checked there on the Saturday too), I luckily had a Canadian friend down at the show that knows a thing or two about Enfields, so he helped us check it out. It's a basic shooter...nothing fancy, but that's all I was looking for at this point in my collecting career. The bottom of the butt-stock is chewed up, and looks like the damage you would expect from someone firing it while having it resting on a rock. The lock is nice, and it cocks nice and crisp. I'll have the pics up next week. Been crazy busy at work and now I'll even be out of town a few days for work. I haven't even had time to fondle the new toys since I' got back. Was well worth the long drive to Baltimore, and I might have talked myself out of it if you had not encouraged me to make the effort.

Re being in "hectic mode"...no worries, we were all on the hunt. If anything, I felt I was displaying more "hectic mode" than you, and had hoped you might understand why. You were gracious with your time and advice...a true southern gentleman. You had encouraged me in advance to use you as a "goodies" spotter and to not hesitate to ask for help.
 
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Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Messages
3,107
#7
Lanyard Puller...since you had already left by the time I spotted the Enfield at the HorseSoldier tables (I swear it wasn't there on the Saturday, and my son says he had checked there on the Saturday too), I luckily had a Canadian friend down at the show that knows a thing or two about Enfields, so he helped us check it out. It's a basic shooter...nothing fancy, but that's all I was looking for at this point in my collecting career. The bottom of the butt-stock is chewed up, and looks like the damage you would expect from someone firing it while having it resting on a rock. The lock is nice, and it cocks nice and crisp. I'll have the pics up next week. Been crazy busy at work and now I'll even be out of town a few days for work. I haven't even had time to fondle the new toys since I' got back. Was well worth the long drive to Baltimore, and I might have talked myself out of it if you had not encouraged me to make the effort.

Re being in "hectic mode"...no worries, we were all on the hunt. If anything, I felt I was displaying more "hectic mode" than you, and had hoped you might understand why. You were gracious with your time and advice...a true southern gentleman. You had encouraged me in advance to use you as a "goodies" spotter and to not hesitate to ask for help.
He was only in hectic mode because he knew there was a nice bottle of scotch waiting for him at the Hampton Inn...…...
 
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Jul 28, 2015
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3,107
#9
Now that is just dirty pool... unless it was bribery in which case I will shut up and applaud your taste in bribery..
No fortunately or unfortunately the other half "made" me go on a cruise to Belize at the time of the show, so I missed the Scotchfest…...the Mayan ruins are incredible as is the diving by the way.....
 
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#14
Congrats. Your trip was worthwhile. That's the barrel you needed to shoot without an armor plated, asbestos suit on !
The mark you posted is a bit "too far gone" and there are at least half a dozen things which could have been under the crown.
Pics of the new Enfield coming up today, if *$#### Windows will leave my computers alone...
 
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#15
For the artillery buffs, here's a powder flask that I brought back South, where it belongs, from Baltimore. Full details and a photo can be found in Ray Riling's, Powder Flask book, 1953: pages 94-94 for text and photo on page 363, item 868. Quotes here are { " "} from Riling and his USN quoted documents.

It's a Gosport Navy Yard marked priming flask, being from the first lot of brass flasks made to replace the horn flasks which were in USN use.
In early 1842 the U.S. Navy began "contemplating" switching to copper flasks from horn for "priming cannon aboard men-of war". Two types of flasks were developed; one at the Washington Navy Yard, the other at Gosport. A march 1, 1842 "letters to Commandants" from Capt. Lewis Washington, USN advised the USN to cease making horn flasks and that 500 of the new copper pattern were to be made.

The Gosport Navy Yard was captured by Virginia troops early in the ACW along with large artillery pieces, small arms, etc., etc.

The "powder flask mafia" all fondled this poor thing at Baltimore and almost agreed that "about", "maybe" less that 6 are known. I've seen only one and it was crushed flat. Dimensions are: 11" long, 5.5" wide, and 2+- " thick. There's also something about the "G N Y " mark that I'll save for the last photo.

Anchors Away.

Gerald Roxbury, retired USN Cmdr. and CSN expert recognized the splice in the cord, as a something or other which is very hard to do and 100% original. Of course I forgot what it's called. He also has one.
20190320_100446_resized (2).jpg


A close-up of the mark.
20190320_100505_resized (2).jpg


Compare the dies with a Robbins & Lawrence 1849 Mississippi, liberated by Va. from Gosport.
20190320_105020_resized (2).jpg
 
Joined
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Messages
3,107
#16
For the artillery buffs, here's a powder flask that I brought back South, where it belongs, from Baltimore. Full details and a photo can be found in Ray Riling's, Powder Flask book, 1953: pages 94-94 for text and photo on page 363, item 868. Quotes here are { " "} from Riling and his USN quoted documents.

It's a Gosport Navy Yard marked priming flask, being from the first lot of brass flasks made to replace the horn flasks which were in USN use.
In early 1842 the U.S. Navy began "contemplating" switching to copper flasks from horn for "priming cannon aboard men-of war". Two types of flasks were developed; one at the Washington Navy Yard, the other at Gosport. A march 1, 1842 "letters to Commandants" from Capt. Lewis Washington, USN advised the USN to cease making horn flasks and that 500 of the new copper pattern were to be made.

The Gosport Navy Yard was captured by Virginia troops early in the ACW along with large artillery pieces, small arms, etc., etc.

The "powder flask mafia" all fondled this poor thing at Baltimore and almost agreed that "about", "maybe" less that 6 are known. I've seen only one and it was crushed flat. Dimensions are: 11" long, 5.5" wide, and 2+- " thick. There's also something about the "G N Y " mark that I'll save for the last photo.

Anchors Away.

Gerald Roxbury, retired USN Cmdr. and CSN expert recognized the splice in the cord, as a something or other which is very hard to do and 100% original. Of course I forgot what it's called. He also has one.
View attachment 298004

A close-up of the mark.
View attachment 298007

Compare the dies with a Robbins & Lawrence 1849 Mississippi, liberated by Va. from Gosport.
View attachment 298008
Did you then fill it with Islay S****h?
 
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Messages
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#19
Another Baltimore find was this Enfield Pattern 1858 Bar-on-Band rifle. It's a brass mounted, commercial version. This rifle makes 11 of the brass versions known and they are more of this type than the iron mounted regulation type. This example is number 4682 and it has a matching numbered ram rod. This is the highest number recorded for this model rifle.

"K" is the mark of James Kerr, a principal at London Armory gunsmith and inventor.. Also Kerr long range rifles and Kerr revolvers.
20190320_100200_resized (2).jpg


20190320_100051_resized (2).jpg


Marks were removed from the lock plate, as in some other Kerr Enfields, an uneven surface is evident. Also there is no provision for a sling swivel which would be on the front of the trigger bow in a Pattern 1858 rifle
20190320_100226_resized (2).jpg


Placement of the sling swivel {long gone} in the stock, on this very late in production rifle.
20190320_100306_resized (2).jpg


NO, I don't have the matching bayonet. :unsure:
 



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