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History Goober Peas soup

Discussion in 'Foods of the Civil War' started by everybodyfriend, Jan 12, 2014.

  1. everybodyfriend

    everybodyfriend Private

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    And during the Civil War, Union troops fighting in the south discovered that peanuts were a fortifying and tasty source of protein. As peanuts became a staple crop in Virginia, peanut soup remained popular throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.referred to peanuts as pindars, a term that resurfaced in the Civil War folk ditty, Goober Peas, which is attributed to an A. Pindar and a P. Nutttongue-in-cheek pseudonyms for the realcomposers.

     

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  3. bensearch

    bensearch Corporal

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    It is interesting to me that you mention peanuts as an important food when staples were running scarce. My great grandmother owned a pie bakery for many years from 1930s-1960s. She used lard and vinegar for the crusts. During WWII however, she was forced to use peanutbutter for the crust as she could no longer obtain lard.
     
  4. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    Lard, vineagar and peanut butter, all for crusts? Love to hear anyone who has had all of those- the previous generations could BAKE, though, I'm guessing the pies were excellent anyway. Easy to make awesome pies with butter, or butter flavored Crisco- takes a genius to turn out great apple pie using lard or peanut butter.
     
  5. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    My wife will love to hear she's genius. We render our own lard from the pigs we raise. Leaf fat makes the best quality lard, it is in two huge sheets inside the abdomen alongside the kidneys. It makes the flakiest pie crusts and biscuits possible, IMO. We've never tried peanut butter. Ugh! I like peanuts boiled or roasted but not in sweets.
     
  6. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Colonel Forum Host

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    Ha! Sheldon Cooper's mother, too- I admit to laughing way too hard, the episode where his mother says the secret ingredient to her desert was lard. To me, it doesn't have much taste at ALL, so using it in a crust and having the pie turn out beautifully, is this mystifying process! I'd have to guess that people like yourselves, and those who did exactly that since day 1 over the centuries discovered THE key to the mystery. What I might go to the store and buy as ' lard' would not have a ton in common with real, farm quality stuff? That's my excuse anyway- maybe I should stop there. :smile:
     
  7. bensearch

    bensearch Corporal

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    I agree-store bought lard Is not the same as farm rendered. I have had pie made with the real stuff. You don't need butter when a pie crust is that flaky. My grandmother, the pie baker said the vinegar would keep gluten from forming which is what might make a pie crust tough. Her pies always had a thinner crust-the most important ingredient was the home made filling.
     
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  8. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    Yes! Lard and bacon grease were the lubricants of choice before Crisco. And Crisco never satisfactorily replaced lard. Pie crusts were flakier. Fried chicken was crispier.

    Betraying my age here, but on top of the wood stove was a cup of bacon grease. It was used to swipe whatever was going to be baked or fried. I have that cup and, although I don't use it, it was very much a part of whatever magic Mom did in the kitchen. Bacon grease and lard.
    And everyone did that and all lived into their 90's. But it was more physical then. Maybe that's the key?
     
  9. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    But the next project will be to make peanut soup. You can call them goober peas if you'd like. Peanut soup sounds really good. Next in line after clam chowder.
     
  10. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    One of the best peanut soups we have ever had is the Kings Arms Tavern (Colonial Williamsburg) Cream of Peanut Soup.

    Recipe:

    1 medium onion, chopped
    2 ribs of celery, chopped
    1/4 cup butter
    3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 quarts chicken stock or canned chicken broth
    2 cups smooth peanut butter
    1 3/4 cups light cream
    peanuts, chopped

    Saute the onion and celery in the butter until soft, but not brown.
    Stir in the flour until well blended.
    Add the chicken stock, stirring constantly, and bring to a boil.
    Remove from the heat and rub through a sieve.
    Add the peanut butter and cream, stirring to blend thoroughly.
    Return to low heat and heat until just hot, but do not boil. Serve, garnished with chopped peanuts.

    Serves 10 to 12.
     
  11. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    I didn't use lard for a while after we stopped making it ourselves then started using the manteca style - the Mexicans don't render it as clear. That style is good for refried beans and a host of other great dishes, but not for pastries and pies! Never thought about peanut butter, though...:confused:

    p s
    Never have gotten rid of the bacon grease cup, though! :happy:
     
  12. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    For National Peanut Day, Sept. 13, bring up this thread. This has delicious recipe for Peanut Soup.
     
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  13. nitrofd

    nitrofd Colonel Forum Host

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    We have had the peanut soup there and it is really a treat it you never had it.my wife likes to make it in the fall.our daughter loves it so much that my wife taught her how to make properly and now she makes it for special occasions up in Atlanta.
     
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  14. Schwallanscher

    Schwallanscher 1st Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    okay, i fall for it -> got some questions

    a medium onion? as big as a tennis ball or a basketball? (i really prefer ball-measurements for that kind of stuff)
    all-purpose flower? the usual stuff, what is called typ 405 here, the 08/15 of flower?
    light cream? some sort of fat-reduced cream?
    quart? to me that's something you apply with a sabre to someone's head :wink: a quarter pint or gallon?

    thx in advance
     
  15. nitrofd

    nitrofd Colonel Forum Host

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    A medium onion is about the size of a tennis ball,as to cream,light cream would be the type of cream you would use in your coffe,heavy cream is what you would use to make whipped cream or even butter out of.
    As for flour your system of names would be different from ours,as ours goes by all purpose,bread flour,cake flour.all purpose flour is also called patent commercially,and bread flour is called high gluten commercially.cake flour is a lighter flour used for cakes and making pastry doughs or even phillo dough.
    Good to see you back.
     
  16. Schwallanscher

    Schwallanscher 1st Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    typ 405 is used for cakes (and as such it's all-puropose, here - not many people bake their own bread), so i probably use wiener griesla (brandname) which is a little more rough - as to coffee is use 33% fat on it :smile coffee: (aka schlagsahne with schlagen = to whip) coffeecream usually has about 4 - 12 % but it is cooked - a tennisball is what i call a medium onion too (my mother demands it's different, though) - as for the quart i think it's a guarter gallon, right? (serving 10-12 was some kind of a hint) - my profile said i had to do some heavy work and i changed that yesterday to being back.

    thx for the answers
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2016
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  17. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    I am glad nitrofd sent answers. I was busy this morning and hadn't check forum.
     
  18. nitrofd

    nitrofd Colonel Forum Host

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    A quart is an English measure not metric. 1 quart = 32 ounces,1 pint = 16 ounces,and 1 gallon = 128 ounces.hope this will make it easier to understand our measurements.
     
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  19. Schwallanscher

    Schwallanscher 1st Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    so you threw them brits a tea-party but kept their imperial meassurements? these are liquid ounces , i suposse? :stomp:

    the french were your friends then, why didn't you choose their REPUBLICAN meassurment, when it became available?

    edit: 1 gallon = 4.54609 litres, guess it's okay when i do what indiana did with pi (1897?) and define it as a nice 4.5 litres which makes two quarts 2.25 litres
     
  20. nitrofd

    nitrofd Colonel Forum Host

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    Actually us yanks refines the British measurements to suit our needs.a British gallon (imperial) is larger then our gallon.I know an British pint is 20oz. Compared to ours which is16oz.that is one of the reasons a gallon of gasoline costs so much more in England then here because it is about 38oz. More then ours.
     
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  21. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    It is Peanut Day, so bumping this thread. There are so many great recipes using peanuts.
     

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