Gettysburg, Where Was Your Ancestor?

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rpkennedy

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Do you know where the fallen men from that fight were buried? Only asking because some were sent home to be interred, 1870's. So many unidentified, always wonder who was able to ascertain if a family member had been included.
There were a lot of Confederate burials north northwest of the McPherson Farm, north of the railroad and some just west of the Thompson House on Seminary Ridge. I would think most of the men killed along the railroad cut were taken to one of these locations for interment.

Ryan
 

JPK Huson 1863

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There were a lot of Confederate burials north northwest of the McPherson Farm, north of the railroad and some just west of the Thompson House on Seminary Ridge. I would think most of the men killed along the railroad cut were taken to one of these locations for interment.

Ryan

Thanks very much! Have a terrible time navigating records, not being what anyone would call a researcher. Worst problem has been who was buried where, North and South. Taking it further, cannot find what order was instituted when reinterring, both the 1863/1864 to the National Cemetery and the 1870's effort.

I don't mean to be confusing- example is JPK, one of 2 relatives now ' Unknown ' in the New York section. Only man killed when his company , 126th NY was sent to clear out snipers, at the Bliss barn July 2nd ( Arabella Wilson's compilation on the 126th ). Unsurprising in that shambles, his name was missing by the time Biggs and Weaver came for him. Knowing where men were taken from, and when, could at least narrow down which is his grave. Same with another uncle killed Day 1, in front of the 11th PA memorial somewhere.

Scuse please- it's not just because these are my relatives. Intent is understanding ' what happened ' , to men who marched into town and never left. It's more ' Where are your ancestors ' than the OP, but relevant. Appreciate the help, thanks again.
 

rpkennedy

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Thanks very much! Have a terrible time navigating records, not being what anyone would call a researcher. Worst problem has been who was buried where, North and South. Taking it further, cannot find what order was instituted when reinterring, both the 1863/1864 to the National Cemetery and the 1870's effort.

I don't mean to be confusing- example is JPK, one of 2 relatives now ' Unknown ' in the New York section. Only man killed when his company , 126th NY was sent to clear out snipers, at the Bliss barn July 2nd ( Arabella Wilson's compilation on the 126th ). Unsurprising in that shambles, his name was missing by the time Biggs and Weaver came for him. Knowing where men were taken from, and when, could at least narrow down which is his grave. Same with another uncle killed Day 1, in front of the 11th PA memorial somewhere.

Scuse please- it's not just because these are my relatives. Intent is understanding ' what happened ' , to men who marched into town and never left. It's more ' Where are your ancestors ' than the OP, but relevant. Appreciate the help, thanks again.
Get a PDF or hard copy of Elliott's map of burials. It will give you an idea of where many of the bodies were buried and then you can extrapolate as from where the bodies came from. That's what I did. :whistling:

Ryan
 
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captaindrew

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I've mentioned my Union relatives that I believe were there earlier in the thread but I recently discovered I had four cousins in Co. D 7th Virginia. Thanks to the recent thread on here about the last man to carry the 7th Va, flag over the wall I just read the book " The Story of a Confederate Boy in the Civil War" According to the book one cousin, Captain of Co. D, Robert Harvey Bane was present at Gettysburg but lucky for him was taken down with the heat and didn't make the charge on the 3d. The other cousins had been previously wounded, one KIA at 1st Manassas, and knocked out of service. Capt. Bane survived the war and was with the company till near the bitter end being captured at Saylor's Creek.
 

Coonewah Creek

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My take is that most were re-interred in the Hollywood Cemetery. They think the last man found fairly recently at the Railroad Cut was from the 2nd Mississippi. He was re-interred with full honors in the National Cemetery. Here's the link..
https://mississippiconfederates.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/a-gun-found-at-gettysburg-the-second-mississippi-infantry-at-the-railroad-cut/
Ooops...that was the wrong link. There WAS a skeleton found several years ago that was also identified belonging most probably to the 2nd Mississippi. Unfortunately I have temporarily misplaced that particular link. My bad...
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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Bump, not because it's ' my ' thread, began it initially because it's awfully important- well, to a Gettysburg geek.

Day 2, The Elliot Map, ( Yes, I know ), Peach Orchard, Barksdale's Mississippians, JPK's 126th New York- a portion of Hay's men. " Remember Harper's Ferry ", as Willard's Brigade redeemed themselves. JPK was already dead by this dusk, the single casualty when his company was sent out to clear snipers from Bliss Barn.

em5 peach orchard.JPG
 

JPK Huson 1863

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There were a lot of Confederate burials north northwest of the McPherson Farm, north of the railroad and some just west of the Thompson House on Seminary Ridge. I would think most of the men killed along the railroad cut were taken to one of these locations for interment.

Ryan

Ok, found this on the Elliot Map- realize Elliot and co were not always accurate but who could be? Pretty close!

em2 lee hq rr cut mcpherson.jpg


em key.JPG
Sorry, I know you know this- in case someone does not.
 

Greendoor

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My GGG Uncle Pvt. William Reay was in Co. A 14th Vermont Infantry. According to the 1890 veteran census his disability was listed as shot in right leg. I believe his unit was near the Vermont State Monument.
If he was wounded at Gettysburg anyone have information on where he may have been taken to treat his wound? Were there records kept on soldiers who were treated at specific hospitals? Thanks.
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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My GGG Uncle Pvt. William Reay was in Co. A 14th Vermont Infantry. According to the 1890 veteran census his disability was listed as shot in right leg. I believe his unit was near the Vermont State Monument.
If he was wounded at Gettysburg anyone have information on where he may have been taken to treat his wound? Were there records kept on soldiers who were treated at specific hospitals? Thanks.

Hang on. @rpkennedy , where was the likeliest place Pvt. Reav may have been taken, please?
 

rpkennedy

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Hang on. @rpkennedy , where was the likeliest place Pvt. Reav may have been taken, please?
Whoops, I missed it here but answered in the thread that they started. The Vermonters were likely treated at the Sarah Patterson farm, due east of the Weikert farm, on the east side of the Taneytown Road.

Ryan
 
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ARW

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I had 8 ancestors at Gettysburg,
141st PVI 2 Great Granduncles Silas Gore and Rubin Schrader, 2 1st cousins George Strong and Fredrick Schrader. The 141st was engaged at the Peach Orchard on July 2nd. Silas Gore was killed there and is believed to buried with the unknowns at the National Cemetery. His brother Samuel 57th PVI had been killed in Fredricksburg attending to the wounded.
143rd PVI 2 1st cousins Granville and Francis Gore. They were on the right of the Iron Brigade at the McPherson farm. They held this position until forced to retreat. My avatar is their monument at the farm. They reformed at what became Lee's HQ in support of Battery B 4th US Artillery until forced to retire through the town. They were the last to leave the field. Somewhere early in the fighting, Granville Furman was shot in the left foot. He told of sitting under a cherry tree eating the cherries and watching the battle go back and forth. My research found that there were cherry trees around the McPherson farm house. Granville was in Satterlee General Hospital in Philadelphia from about July 10, 1863 until February 1, 1864 when he returned to his regiment.
57th PVI Henry Wells 1st cousin. On July 2nd the were at the Sherfy farm. The right of the Fifty-seventh rested on Sherfy's house, in an admirable position, where the men could fire deliberately and with excellent effect. But the regiments farther to the left, failing to get into position in time, the enemy broke through, and flanking the position, caused Graham to fall back. A considerable number of the men had taken cover in an old cellar, and amidst the noise and confusion, did not receive the order to retire, nor notice the withdrawal of the rest of the regiment, but still kept up a rapid and most destructive fire. When too late, they discovered their isolated position, and were nearly all taken prisoners including Henry.
5th Reg PA Res 34 Inf Samuel Wells 1st cousin this unit was not engaged but was in reserve on the rear of the round tops on the 3rd.
2 (640x427).jpg

McPherson Farm



35 (1280x853).jpg

Peach Orchard

DSCN9361 (640x480).jpg

Sherfy Farm
 

ARW

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My G-G-Uncle, William C. Godwin, served in Company D, "Newton Rifles," 13th Mississippi Infantry. His regiment fought in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg.

http://s209.photobucket.com/user/championhilz/slideshow/championhilz071
I had 2 GG Uncles and 2 3x cousins in the 141st PVI at the Peach Orchard. I always find it interesting when I hear about someone from the south that was there. Once when I was visiting the peach orchard I spoke with someone who had a southern ancestor who fought there. Could you imagine what our ancestors would think about us meeting there like that.
 

Gentizzy

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A Great Grandfather's oldest brother, Henry Meaut (pronounced "Mayo"), was in the 1st Louisiana, Company E. Was in many battles from the beginnings of the war. Wounded a number of times and taken prisoner and was freed via prisoner exchange.

At Gettysburg he was at Culp's Hill. He survived unscathed.

Taken prisoner again at Spotsylvania Courthouse. This time he remained prisoner and ended up at Elmira. Freed and came home, and had a career in public service, including mayor of Biloxi.
Lived to the age of 91. He believed that he was the only one of his company to survive the war. Am trying to confirm that. In the records I've found, his name is misspelled - "Meant".
 
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zburkett

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A Great Grandfather's oldest brother, Henry Meaut (pronounced "Mayo"), was in the 1st Louisiana, Company E. Was in many battles from the beginnings of the war. Wounded a number of times and taken prisoner and was freed via prisoner exchange.

At Gettysburg he was at Culp's Hill. He survived unscathed.

Taken prisoner again at Spotsylvania Courthouse. This time he remained prisoner and ended up at Elmira. Freed and came home, and had a career in public service, including mayor of Biloxi.
Lived to the age of 91. He believed that he was the only one of his company to survive the war. Am trying to confirm that. In the records I've found, his name is misspelled - "Meant".
Please keep us informed on what more you find. Very interesting soldier.
 

Legion

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My CW ancestors were in the West during Gettysburg. One had fallen at Burnside's Bridge the 51st Pennsylvania having been one of two regiments instrumental to the taking of the bridge. The others along with the regiment participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg and the Mississippi campaign.

My gr. grandfather - the baby of the family - enlisted at age 16 in June of 1863 as the reports of Lee's army marching northward threw southeastern Pennsylvania into a panic. A regiment of green recruits, they were sent to the coal regions of Pennsylvania to assist in putting down the draft riots that had broken out there.
I know this is an old post but I thought it was interesting. Your ancestors and mine fought against each other at Antietam at Burnside's Bridge.

I have quite a few ancestors that fought in the war but I'm only gonna mention one because I don't have much info on the others.

My 3rd Great Grandfather was Jesse S. Crosby. From what I've gathered he served in the 20th Georgia during the war and fought in a majority of the battles of the AnV (Malvern Hill, Antietam, Gettysburg, The Wilderness, etc.) He also fought in the western theater at Chickamauga with Longstreet.

At Gettysburg he fought around Devils Den alongside 1st Texas and the rest of Bennings and Robertsons Brigades, he was wounded during the 2nd or 3rd day of fighting.
He was also wounded at the Wilderness on May 6th and lost his leg as a result.
 
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EJ Zander

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Bump, not because it's ' my ' thread, began it initially because it's awfully important- well, to a Gettysburg geek.

Day 2, The Elliot Map, ( Yes, I know ), Peach Orchard, Barksdale's Mississippians, JPK's 126th New York- a portion of Hay's men. " Remember Harper's Ferry ", as Willard's Brigade redeemed themselves. JPK was already dead by this dusk, the single casualty when his company was sent out to clear snipers from Bliss Barn.

View attachment 194574
I assume burials would have been done close to where the greatest numbers of soldiers fell and the deceased where not transported to ground more conducive to digging. Looking at the map, the ground/ soil make up on the southern end of this map is awful. Its shallow and rocky.
Never noticed that dead horse locations before. Thanks for posting.
 

JPK Huson 1863

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So cannot believe we missed this- somewhere in this thread is Lewis Huson, JPK's brother, 120th NY- 2 brothers at Gettysburg. 2 were already in the war by 1863, one at Shiloh, one in Richmond. Charles, another brother, 39th New York, Girabaldi Guards. Now to see exactly where they were.

This is he post war, an inventor/engineer- with his aerial tramway. These were used out west for moving ore or coal, or anything up and down mountains. Ski lifts are what's left of aerial trams. Terrific book, " Riding the High Wires ", by Professor Robert Trennert is an amazing look at these, mentions Charles.

charles myron.JPG
 
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