Uniforms Georgians in Gray, by David W. Vaughan.

major bill

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I though anyone interested in uniforms worn by Georgia soldiers might find this interesting. The Georgia Historical Quarterly published a two part article about Georgians in the Civil War in the Spring and Summer 2005 issues of that magazine.
Georgian in Gray.jpg


The article has over 50 photographs of Georgian soldiers. David W. Vaughan includes uniform information of the soldiers in the images There are some interesting uniforms shown in these photographs. Both issues also have other articles about Georgia in the Civil War. I do not know if back issues of The Georgia Historical Quarterly are available.
 

Package4

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I though anyone interested in uniforms worn by Georgia soldiers might find this interesting. The Georgia Historical Quarterly published a two part article about Georgians in the Civil War in the Spring and Summer 2005 issues of that magazine.
View attachment 395701

The article has over 50 photographs of Georgian soldiers. David W. Vaughan includes uniform information of the soldiers in the images There are some interesting uniforms shown in these photographs. Both issues also have other articles about Georgia in the Civil War. I do not know if back issues of The Georgia Historical Quarterly are available.
Very nice, I bet @lelliott19 would be very interested!
 

major bill

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The Georgia Historical Quarterly is a quality publication from the Georgia Historical Society. The Georgia Historical Quarterly in the past has many article about Georgia in the Civil War. The Historical Societies and Historical Associations of many Southern and Northern states publish simular quarterlies. Most states off and on have Civil War articles in these. If you are interested in a particular state you might find some good articles published in these. Sometimes these historical societies publish entire magazine/booklets dedicated to the Civil War such as this one in which the quarterly is dedicated entirely to the Civil War, this is part two.
Ill cw.jpg


My home state of Michigan has published a couple of versions of these 9 inch by 6 inch quarterly historical reviews and the number of issues run in to the hundreds, however, the Civil War is not overly popular and only some issues have Civil War articles.
Mi His 1.jpg
Mi His 2.jpg

The Detroit Historical Society published a simular quarterly. Michigan History went to a magazine style format published bimonthly. The 1961 issues had some good Civil War articles and all 6 issue from 2015 had well illustrated articles. This is a well illustrated special 120 page Civil War Collector issue from July/August 1998.
Mi hist 3.jpg
 

Tom Elmore

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Not dedicated solely to Georgians, but if you want to see some of the incredible images he has then watch this:

https://vimeo.com/preserveatlanta/vaughanestatesales
David W. Vaughan provides interesting descriptions of images his collection.

One in particular that struck me: Between 48:15 and 50:45 is the story of 1st Lieutenant Judson Cormick (not Council) Sapp, Company D, 2nd Georgia Infantry. Hit in the arm by an artillery round prior to his regiment's advance at Gettysburg on July 2, Sapp must have been carried back in the wagon train of wounded to Martinsburg, where he was placed in a home and nursed there by 14-year-old Henrietta Kratz. Vaughan relates a poignant story based in part on information from Henrietta's ancestor. Sapp died in the home on August 1, but Henrietta apparently never got over him. She was later married to a Capt. J. Morgan Sencildiver and they had two children, but she afterwards divorced him and moved back home. In the cemetery where she was buried after her death on September 30, 1934, her gravestone duly notes that she was the wife of Capt. Sencildiver, but surely it is no coincidence that an adjacent small stone bears the inscription of a Confederate soldier who had died back in the summer of 1863: Judson Sapp.
 
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lelliott19

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David W. Vaughan provides interesting descriptions of images his collection.

One in particular that struck me: Between 48:15 and 50:45 is the story of 1st Lieutenant Judson Cormick (not Council) Sapp, Company D, 2nd Georgia Infantry. Hit in the arm by an artillery round prior to his regiment's advance at Gettysburg on July 2, Sapp must have been carried back in the wagon train of wounded to Martinsburg, where he was placed in a home and nursed there by 14-year-old Henrietta Kratz. Vaughan relates a poignant story based in part on information from Henrietta's ancestor. Sapp died in the home on August 1, but Henrietta apparently never got over him. She was later married to a Capt. J. Morgan Sencildiver and they had two children, but she afterwards divorced him and moved back home. In the cemetery where she was buried after her death on September 30, 1934, her gravestone duly notes that she was the wife of Capt. Sencildiver, but surely it is no coincidence that an adjacent small stone bears the inscription of a Confederate soldier who had died back in the summer of 1863: Judson Sapp.
I just watched the video. That poignant story of Henrietta Kratz and Judson Sapp is one of those that really gets to you. I am so glad that Mr. Vaughan shared it.
 

FedericoFCavada

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San Antonio, Texas
Unless I'm mistaken, at the start of the war several Georgia militia started off the war in blue, yes? That and Louisiana, I think.

As folks know better than I, in the War of 1812 there was a shortage of blue dye to make U.S. uniform coatees and jackets, so a gray fatigue jacket was authorized for wear. That trend continued right through to the Mexican War, when the sky blue army uniform was adopted, with a white cotton fatigue uniform still authorized south of the Mason-Dixon. By the 1850s and the Civil War, gray was often the militia uniform color, including Wisconsin, some Michigan, Ohio, and New Hampshire units. Blue was for the regulars, but again, some militia wore blue. Confusing? You bet!
 
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