Restricted Georgia house bill would protect Confederate, Revolutionary War monuments

jgoodguy

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When your city is dysfunctional, the crime rate is soaring and the public school system is in tatters one can always play the race card to divert attention from the real problems. And that is the bottom line.

Indeed, the old South used racism to enrich the rich, keep the poor whites in poverty, keep them ignorant but distracted them by attacking blacks.

Typical Southern politics, here in Alabama the powers that be are concentrating on social issues, illegal immigrants and dissing the Federal Government rather than doing useful things. Easier to do that than raise taxes on the wealthy.
 

Battalion

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Another article from Memphis on the renaming of parks.

Memphis City Council renames three Confederate-themed parks.

http://www.commercialappeal.com/new...-to-review-four-plans-to/?partner=yahoo_feeds

Seems like the Tennessee legislature wants to pass a "Heritage Protection Act of 2013" HB0553 and the Memphis City Council wants to get ahead of such legislation for reasons stated in the article.

Unionblue
The legislature can make it retroactive. "...so named on January 1, 2013..."
 

RobertP

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Indeed, the old South used racism to enrich the rich, keep the poor whites in poverty, keep them ignorant but distracted them by attacking blacks.

Typical Southern politics, here in Alabama the powers that be are concentrating on social issues, illegal immigrants and dissing the Federal Government rather than doing useful things. Easier to do that than raise taxes on the wealthy.
Exactly. The majority in Memphis is concentrating on race baiting to divert attention from the failing schools, poverty, and crime which primarily affect their constituents. Works everytime.

At the Federal level the administration is concentrating on guns, gays, and immigrants to avoid facing up to the critical issue of a nation going bankrupt. And the beat goes on.
 

jgoodguy

Banished Forever
-:- A Mime -:-
is a terrible thing...
Don’t feed the Mime
Joined
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Location
Birmingham, Alabama
Exactly. The majority in Memphis is concentrating on race baiting to divert attention from the failing schools, poverty, and crime which primarily affect their constituents. Works everytime.

At the Federal level the administration is concentrating on guns, gays, and immigrants to avoid facing up to the critical issue of a nation going bankrupt. And the beat goes on.

We going bankrupt? News to me. Lets see what folks are willing to take for our debt. Dang interest rates went down. Foe a while in the last couple of years folks were paying banks to hold dollars for them just for the security.
In sum, no one pays low interest rates to a nation about to bankrupt.
U.S.%20Treasury%20Bond%20Interest%20Rate%20Historical%20Chart.jpg
 

ForeverFree

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District of Columbia
Exactly. The majority in Memphis is concentrating on race baiting to divert attention from the failing schools, poverty, and crime which primarily affect their constituents. Works everytime.

The question is, does renaming parks actually divert attention from the other issues? Well, it hasn't fooled you... I don't think anybody in Memphis would argue that the law they passed is addressing the serious social issues of the day.

Here is what they did say:

The idea for the resolution to change the name of all three parks emerged Monday morning, after council members learned of a state House bill that would prevent parks named after historical military figures from being renamed.​
The bill was seen by the council as unnecessary interference by state lawmakers. Because a House vote is likely several days away, the council voted on a resolution to remove the military names and go with more generic ones, giving them time to decide on new park names without worrying about state action.​

Thus, the law is situated in the context that the City Council feels that the state is taking away the city's freedom to control its public space. And by any objective analysis, the city is correct in that opinion. It's that simple.

And as in the case of Georgia: note that only a certain set of named parks are given preferential treatment. Only parks named after historical military figures cannot be renamed. Parks named after fallen police officers; firefighters; non-military related governors or mayors or legislators; literary or other artistic figures; business leaders; pioneers; teachers; civic leaders; etc, would not receive any protection.

The state might as well just name every park and street after a Confederate officer. That will teach those people in Memphis a real lesson in democracy and governance.

- Alan
 

jgoodguy

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is a terrible thing...
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The question is, does renaming parks actually divert attention from the other issues? Well, it hasn't fooled you... I don't think anybody in Memphis would argue that the law they passed is addressing the serious social issues of the day.

Here is what they did say:

The idea for the resolution to change the name of all three parks emerged Monday morning, after council members learned of a state House bill that would prevent parks named after historical military figures from being renamed.​
The bill was seen by the council as unnecessary interference by state lawmakers. Because a House vote is likely several days away, the council voted on a resolution to remove the military names and go with more generic ones, giving them time to decide on new park names without worrying about state action.​

Thus, the law is situated in the context that the City Council feels that the state is taking away the city's freedom to control its public space. And by any objective analysis, the city is correct in that opinion. It's that simple.

And as in the case of Georgia: note that only a certain set of named parks are given preferential treatment. Only parks named after historical military figures cannot be renamed. Parks named after fallen police officers; firefighters; non-military related governors or mayors or legislators; literary or other artistic figures; business leaders; pioneers; teachers; civic leaders; etc, would not receive any protection.

The state might as well just name every park and street after a Confederate officer. That will teach those people in Memphis a real lesson in democracy and governance.

- Alan

I am sure that the law can be circumvented. For example, a monument gets sent to warehouse for repairs. The public land under the monument get privatized and the monument has to be moved. There are always accidents and so forth.

Note the exception for roads. I'll bet that if some large developer needs to move a monument for some reason it will get moved.
 

RobertP

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Nov 11, 2009
Location
Dallas
We going bankrupt? News to me. Lets see what folks are willing to take for our debt. Dang interest rates went down. Foe a while in the last couple of years folks were paying banks to hold dollars for them just for the security.
In sum, no one pays low interest rates to a nation about to bankrupt.
U.S.%20Treasury%20Bond%20Interest%20Rate%20Historical%20Chart.jpg
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying. 10 yr. Treasuries are yielding 2%. The biggest buyer is the Federal Reserve which keeps rates low and hopefully stimulates the economy. China and others are shying away, preferring gold.

As for borrowing rates, they are low because 1) the Fed continues to print more money to pay for increasing Debt and juice the no-growth economy. ) There is low demand for capital in this no growth economy, 3) Because of the no-growth economy we have virtually no inflation.

The US is still the safest place to invest, but that's like saying our pig has the prettiest lipstick.
 
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