General Longstreet request to swap jobs with General Ewell.

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Rebforever

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Richmond, January 9, 1864.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Va., Orange Court-House:

GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Longstreet has asked to be relieved from his present command and corps. Would you advise his exchange with Lieutenant-General Ewell? Please answer for information of the President.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

-------------------------------------------------

January 10, 1864.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond.:

GENERAL: I have received your letter of the 9th instant in reference to request of General Longstreet to be relieved from his present command and of his corps. I do not know the reasons that have induced him to take this step, but that they are not such as to make it necessary. I do not know any one to take his place in either position. I do not think it advantageous that he and Lieutenant-General Ewell should exchange corps, believing that each corps would be more effective as at present organized. I cannot, therefore, recommend their exchange.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

https://ehistory.osu.edu/books/official-records/060/1075
 

John S. Carter

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Richmond, January 9, 1864.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Army of Northern Va., Orange Court-House:

GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Longstreet has asked to be relieved from his present command and corps. Would you advise his exchange with Lieutenant-General Ewell? Please answer for information of the President.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

-------------------------------------------------

January 10, 1864.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond.:

GENERAL: I have received your letter of the 9th instant in reference to request of General Longstreet to be relieved from his present command and of his corps. I do not know the reasons that have induced him to take this step, but that they are not such as to make it necessary. I do not know any one to take his place in either position. I do not think it advantageous that he and Lieutenant-General Ewell should exchange corps, believing that each corps would be more effective as at present organized. I cannot, therefore, recommend their exchange.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

https://ehistory.osu.edu/books/official-records/060/1075
What theater of war was Longstreet in and where was Ewell? What was their relationship,militarily and personal following Gettysburg? Was the "Ol' War Horse" wanting a new field ? What part may Ewell have played,did the two discuss this change of duty?Last,if there was any disturbance between the two why did he not approve?
 
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lelliott19

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To be clear, Longstreet asked to be relieved from his present command. It was Cooper who suggested that Ewell and Longstreet swap places.
Would you advise his exchange with Lieutenant-General Ewell?
Here is Longstreet's suggestion that he resign from his "Independent Command" in East Tennessee. This was in December 1863 in East Tennessee during Longstreet's period of Independent Command - after Chattanooga/Knoxville and prior to returning to the ANV in time for the Wilderness.

Entry from Longstreet's Confidential Letters & Telegrams Sent Feb 1863-Feb 1865 under date Dec 30, 1863:
upload_2017-6-13_23-5-14-png.png

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/26282311 - Image 16-17

Headquarters Russellville E. T.
December 30, 1863


General

I am here without authority to order Courts Martial or any other authority which is necessary to a separate Command. I am entirely cut off from communication with Gen Bragg's Army, and cannot get from those Hd Qtrs orders for Courts Boards of Examination or anything else. I desire to be assigned as part of some other officer's Command whom I may reach with less trouble and in less time. A part of Gen S Jones command is with me and should remain here if the Department intends that this should be a field for futher operations. If the command is to remain, it should be understood from the Department.

If this field is to be held with a view to future operations I earnestly desire that some other officer be sent to the Command. If a senior officer can be sent, I can cheerfully give him all the aid in my power. If none but a junior officer can be spared, it will give me much pleasure to relinquish it in his favor - and aid him by any suggestions that my experience may enable me to give.

I regret to say that a combination of circumstances has so operated during the campaign in E Tenn as to prevent the complete destruction of the enemy's forces in this part of the State. It is fair to infer that fault is entirely with me and I desire therefore that some other commander be tried.

I thought it necessary a few days ago to relive Maj Gen McLaws from duty with this command and to order him to Augusta Ga. Charges will be forwarded in the case in a few days. Since his removal I find other plans in operation, some which seem to be with a view to the promotion of individuals and others probably, for the purpose of avoiding the arduous service which my troops are exposed to. These are my excuses, but as I have already stated, the fair and proper inference is that the fault is entirely with me. I am therefore exceedingly anxious that the country should have the service of some officer who may be better suited to such a position I believe that this is the only personal favor that I have asked of the Government, and I hope that I may have reason to expect that it may be granted.
I remain Sir resptly
Yr mst obt svt
J Longstreet
LtGen Commdg


Gen S Cooper
A&IG
 
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Rebforever

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What theater of war was Longstreet in and where was Ewell? What was their relationship,militarily and personal following Gettysburg? Was the "Ol' War Horse" wanting a new field ? What part may Ewell have played,did the two discuss this change of duty?Last,if there was any disturbance between the two why did he not approve?
General Ewell was ill before Mine Run and his Corp was turned over to General Early, but he did return to fight at the Wilderness battle.
 

Andy Cardinal

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To be clear, Longstreet asked to be relieved from his present command. It was Cooper who suggested that Ewell and Longstreet swap places.


Here is Longstreet's suggestion that he resign from his "Independent Command" in East Tennessee. This was in December 1863 in East Tennessee during Longstreet's period of Independent Command - after Chattanooga/Knoxville and prior to returning to the ANV in time for the Wilderness.

Entry from Longstreet's Confidential Letters & Telegrams Sent Feb 1863-Feb 1865 under date Dec 30, 1863:
View attachment 318366
https://catalog.archives.gov/id/26282311 - Image 16-17

Headquarters Russellville E. T.
December 30, 1863


General

I am here without authority to order Courts Martial or any other authority which is necessary to a separate Command. I am entirely cut off from communication with Gen Bragg's Army, and cannot get from those Hd Qtrs orders for Courts Boards of Examination or anything else. I desire to be assigned as part of some other officer's Command whom I may reach with less trouble and in less time. A part of Gen S Jones command is with me and should remain here if the Department intends that this should be a field for futher operations. If the command is to remain, it should be understood from the Department.

If this field is to be held with a view to future operations I earnestly desire that some other officer be sent to the Command. If a senior officer can be sent, I can cheerfully give him all the aid in my power. If none but a junior officer can be spared, it will give me much pleasure to relinquish it in his favor - and aid him by any suggestions that my experience may enable me to give.

I regret to say that a combination of circumstances has so operated during the campaign in E Tenn as to prevent the complete destruction of the enemy's forces in this part of the State. It is fair to infer that fault is entirely with me and I desire therefore that some other commander be tried.

I thought it necessary a few days ago to relive Maj Gen McLaws from duty with this command and to order him to Augusta Ga. Charges will be forwarded in the case in a few days. Since his removal I find other plans in operation, some which seem to be with a view to the promotion of individuals and others probably, for the purpose of avoiding the arduous service which my troops are exposed to. These are my excuses, but as I have already stated, the fair and proper inference is that the fault is entirely with me. I am therefore exceedingly anxious that the country should have the service of some officer who may be better suited to such a position I believe that this is the only personal favor that I have asked of the Government, and I hope that I may have reason to expect that it may be granted.
I remain Sir resptly
Yr mst obt svt
J Longstreet
LtGen Commdg


Gen S Cooper
A&IG
Thanks for clarifying.
 
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uaskme

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Nobody wanted that area to command. Longstreet was trying to get out of it. There was no Glory there. Confederates never had enough Troops to control the Area. Federals never control it either. Majority of people were disloyal to the Confederacy. Longstreet is cut off from Bragg to the South. Mountains to the East and West. Only objective Longstreet has, is to eat all the groceries so a Federal Force can’t have them. It is a thankless job. Both Confederates and Federal are just trying to hang on, fighting for forage areas.
 
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John S. Carter

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Thanks for clarifying.
Please to define ''independent command'', Was he not sent to that theater by Richmond?At this time was Lee commander of all Confederate forces and there by could arrange any command changes? What reason did Longstreet have in requesting the transfer and was it back to the Eastern theater aka to ARNV?
 

Rebforever

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Please to define ''independent command'',
Longstreet was on his own at Knoxville.

Was he not sent to that theater by Richmond?[ /quote]

Longstreet was sent to General Bragg by Davis after consulting with General Lee who agreed.

At this time was Lee commander of all Confederate forces and there by could arrange any command changes? What reason did Longstreet have in requesting the transfer and was it back to the Eastern theater aka to ARNV
General Lee was made Commander-In-Chief of all armies winter ‘65.
Longstreet asked to go to Tennessee And asked to come back to Virginia because things didn’t work out for him in East Tennessee.
 
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uaskme

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Longstreet was on his own at Knoxville.
Bragg sent Longstreet to Knoxville. Bragg had operational control over East TN. Bragg talked to Davis about it. When Bragg did this, he was in the process of sending 2 more Divisions to Longstreet. Lookout Mtn and Missionary Ridge Battles stoped that from happening. So, Longstreet is on his own. Bragg retreats to Dalton, so the AOT is in GA, heading South and cut off from TN.

Sherman was suppose to roll up, Missionary Ridge, then go to Knoxville to rescue Burnside. Don’t happen that way, but he goes to Knoxville. By the time Longstreet attacks Knoxville, he knows Sherman is coming. Sherman wants to push Longstreet out of TN, Burnside don’t agree with him. Ultimately Burnside gets cashiered.
 
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uaskme

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Here is a good summary of what happened after Knoxville, the Local Unionist float food to Burnside during the siege:

This short battle of Knoxville ended Longstreet's campaign to recapture Knoxville. The Union force sent in relief reached Maryville on December 5, and Sherman went ahead into Knoxville to confer with Burnside. Their discussion was not pleasant. Sherman had driven his men to exhaustion, but when he reached the city he found Burnside and his staff eating Thanksgiving dinner. Nonetheless, Sherman offered to bring up the entire Fourth Corps and assist Burnside in driving Longstreet out of East Tennessee. But Burnside was fearful of overburdening his fragile supply system, and he decided to take only two divisions.

Burnside's refusal to accept aid proved to be his second major blunder. On December 7 he marched north out of Knoxville and followed Longstreet as far a Rogersville. After a week of skirmishing, however, Longstreet counterattacked in force and drove the Federals back to Blaine's Cross Roads. This setback ended Union attempts to clear East Tennessee. Burnside resigned his command in late December, and his successor, Major General John G, Foster, soon became too ill to take the field. Foster was followed by Major General John Schofield, but by the time Schofield arrived in February 1864 other Union airs took precedence over East Tennessee. Sherman, who wanted no distractions form preparations for his Atlanta campaign, instructed Schofield not to challenge Longstreet, and he refused to alter this decision even at the urging of President Lincoln. Grant also saw East Tennessee as a low priority, and in early February he abandoned his plans to send fourteen thousand men under Thomas to drive Longstreet out.

These decisions were based on both practical considerations and strategic priorities. As Grant noted, the lack of transportation and the scarcity of forage made it difficult to sustain a large force in East Tennessee. Further, if threatened, Longstreet could simply fall back into Virginia and then return to East Tennessee as soon as Union forces departed. Both Grant and Sherman believed that when spring came Longstreet would voluntarily rejoin Lee in Virginia, and they concluded that the costs of driving him out were not justified. Union commanders were in no hurry for Confederate forces to leave East Tennessee, for as long as Longstreet remained isolated in this theater he could not contribute to Confederate operations in Virginia or Georgia, the two areas now central in Union planing. pp118-119 War at Every Door by Fisher
 
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John S. Carter

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Here is a good summary of what happened after Knoxville, the Local Unionist float food to Burnside during the siege:

This short battle of Knoxville ended Longstreet's campaign to recapture Knoxville. The Union force sent in relief reached Maryville on December 5, and Sherman went ahead into Knoxville to confer with Burnside. Their discussion was not pleasant. Sherman had driven his men to exhaustion, but when he reached the city he found Burnside and his staff eating Thanksgiving dinner. Nonetheless, Sherman offered to bring up the entire Fourth Corps and assist Burnside in driving Longstreet out of East Tennessee. But Burnside was fearful of overburdening his fragile supply system, and he decided to take only two divisions.

Burnside's refusal to accept aid proved to be his second major blunder. On December 7 he marched north out of Knoxville and followed Longstreet as far a Rogersville. After a week of skirmishing, however, Longstreet counterattacked in force and drove the Federals back to Blaine's Cross Roads. This setback ended Union attempts to clear East Tennessee. Burnside resigned his command in late December, and his successor, Major General John G, Foster, soon became too ill to take the field. Foster was followed by Major General John Schofield, but by the time Schofield arrived in February 1864 other Union airs took precedence over East Tennessee. Sherman, who wanted no distractions form preparations for his Atlanta campaign, instructed Schofield not to challenge Longstreet, and he refused to alter this decision even at the urging of President Lincoln. Grant also saw East Tennessee as a low priority, and in early February he abandoned his plans to send fourteen thousand men under Thomas to drive Longstreet out.

These decisions were based on both practical considerations and strategic priorities. As Grant noted, the lack of transportation and the scarcity of forage made it difficult to sustain a large force in East Tennessee. Further, if threatened, Longstreet could simply fall back into Virginia and then return to East Tennessee as soon as Union forces departed. Both Grant and Sherman believed that when spring came Longstreet would voluntarily rejoin Lee in Virginia, and they concluded that the costs of driving him out were not justified. Union commanders were in no hurry for Confederate forces to leave East Tennessee, for as long as Longstreet remained isolated in this theater he could not contribute to Confederate operations in Virginia or Georgia, the two areas now central in Union planing. pp118-119 War at Every Door by Fisher
How would you describe this strategy on the part of Bragg and Davis ,idiocy ,reckless,thoughtless,Davisonian,Braggish ,or desperate? It would seem as though that Longstreet was a commander without a command .This is the same strategy which cost the Confederacy a army at Vicksburg.
 
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Jamieva

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Please to define ''independent command'', Was he not sent to that theater by Richmond?At this time was Lee commander of all Confederate forces and there by could arrange any command changes? What reason did Longstreet have in requesting the transfer and was it back to the Eastern theater aka to ARNV?
Lee was not the general in chief until march 1865
 
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