General Longstreet’s 1904 Funeral procession

mnor

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Came across this photo while researching some facts on Gainesville Ga.
From the book:
Gainesville: 1900-2000 By Gordon Sawyer

"Gen. James Longstreet
The Confederacy’s legendary Gen. James Longstreet had moved to
Gainesville after the war, operating the Piedmont Hotel and
expecting Gainesville to become the railroad hub of the Southeast.
The Above Picture is thought to be that of General Longstreet’s 1904
funeral procession through Gainesville."
 

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WJC

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View attachment 157082

Came across this photo while researching some facts on Gainesville Ga.
From the book:
Gainesville: 1900-2000 By Gordon Sawyer

"Gen. James Longstreet
The Confederacy’s legendary Gen. James Longstreet had moved to
Gainesville after the war, operating the Piedmont Hotel and
expecting Gainesville to become the railroad hub of the Southeast.
The Above Picture is thought to be that of General Longstreet’s 1904
funeral procession through Gainesville."
Thanks for posting this. I've never before seen a photo of Longstreet's funeral.
 

War Horse

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View attachment 157082

Came across this photo while researching some facts on Gainesville Ga.
From the book:
Gainesville: 1900-2000 By Gordon Sawyer

"Gen. James Longstreet
The Confederacy’s legendary Gen. James Longstreet had moved to
Gainesville after the war, operating the Piedmont Hotel and
expecting Gainesville to become the railroad hub of the Southeast.
The Above Picture is thought to be that of General Longstreet’s 1904
funeral procession through Gainesville."
In many ways he lived a tragic life. Helen sure arrived at the right time. He certainly had his share of ups and downs following the war. Mostly downs.
 

civilken

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I have always felt the general was the classic example of a American male yes he did fight against the United States and I believe that was wrong but he stood up for what he believed in after the war he worked to bring the country together and that says more about the man then the other generals who ran around looking for excuses and someone to blame. I have always admired his attitude if you don't like me I really don't care was how he felt..
 

Patrick H

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This is nice to see and the General is obviously being given a solemn and dignified send off. However, having been a pall bearer numerous times, I have a major question: How in the world did that casket get lifted to such a high point? And how do they intend to get it down when they get to the graveside?
 

War Horse

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Thanks for posting this. I've never before seen a photo of Longstreet's funeral.
"The funeral was held on January 6, and in the estimation of an Atlanta Constitution Reporter, was "the most impressive ceremonial ever held in Gainesville," His remains had been removed from his daughter's house on the 5th and laid in state in the courthouse. until 11:00 A.M. on the 6th when the services began. A local guard unit and representatives of the Longstreet Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, attended the body. Two priests and Bishop Keiley, on of the general's old soldiers, conducted the services. All the children except James attended. Once the services were concluded at the courthouse, pallbearers carried the casket to a hearse, which began the long procession to Alta Vista Cemetery. State and local dignitaries, militia units, Confederate veterans carrying flags, and other groups followed as church bells tolled. At the gravesite, Bishop Keiley gave a eulogy, and the youthful warriors in the Candler and Governor's Horse Guards fired their volley. "Taps" sounded with its haunting notes.

When the news of his death had spread across the country, many newspapers had extolled his virtues as a man and his prowess as a general. But as the pallbearers prepared to lower the casket, a Confederate veteran walked to the grave. Without a word he lay part of his uniform and his enlistment papers on the lid of the coffin, and then stepped back. His comrades understood."

General James Longstreet The Confederacy's Most Controversial Soldier

By Jeffry D. Wert

:smile:
 

War Horse

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This is nice to see and the General is obviously being given a solemn and dignified send off. However, having been a pall bearer numerous times, I have a major question: How in the world did that casket get lifted to such a high point? And how do they intend to get it down when they get to the graveside?
He had suffered for a long time Patrick, he went from 200+ lbs to an estimated 135 lbs at the time of his death. There was plenty of help on hand to handle the task.
 

War Horse

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Those old CSA soldiers sure look lean and lank. And yes, it is a fly net and some combination of fancy fly net and mourning outfit.
For a former Confederate solider in 1904, looking lean and lank was certainly better than the alternative. :smile:
 

War Horse

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I've always admired Gen. Longstreet he lived his life well and was a good example for all men. He faced uglier adversaries after the war than he did in the war. At least in the war his enemies acted with honor.
Not to mention, it was legal to kill them.
 

byron ed

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I have always felt the general was the classic example of a American male yes he did fight against the United States and I believe that was wrong but he stood up for what he believed in after the war he worked to bring the country together and that says more about the man then the other generals who ran around looking for excuses and someone to blame. I have always admired his attitude if you don't like me I really don't care was how he felt..
Good thoughts, I agree. The man deserved a better reputation than he ended up with.


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(But, friend, if you're worried about what people like, try giving them a bit of a breather from one long run-on sentence and try one sentence for each idea, with a little punctuation thrown in. Such as:

"I have always felt the general was the classic example of an American male. Yes, he did fight against the United States and I believe that was wrong, but he stood up for what he believed in. After the war he worked to bring the country together. That says a lot about the man. Other generals ran around looking for excuses and someone to blame. I have always admired his attitude.")
 


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