General John Buford and General Napolian Buford connection

M E Wolf

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#1
Dear List Members,

It is without doubt, that General John Buford that lead the Cavalry forces that spotted and held 'good ground,' at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania was extremely important.

General Buford's famous reply to an offer by his native state, to gain a commission on the Confederacy forces was rejected and strongly lead his forces in the Union.

While General John Buford was focused on Gettysburg; it should be a noteworthy footnote, to add--that his older half brother; Napolian Buford--also a Union General was fighting at Vicksburg, Mississippi. Although General Napolean Buford never rose to the name recognition as his younger half-brother; the two brothers were fighting at the same time; the two most influential battles - Gettysburg and Vicksburg. General Napoleon Buford held his rank a few months, expiring when Congress did not comfirm the rank.

Generan Napoleon Buford would survive the Civil War. His younger half brother though, General John Buford would be relieved of command on November 21, 1863, just as he had perfectly set up his troops for the Bristoe and then in perfectly setting up his troops for the
Mine Run Campaign --he was suffering from typhoid fever and died in Washington on December 16, 1863, at the home of General Stoneman and in the arms of his closest friend, Captain Myles Keogh, at the age of 37. Captain Myles Keogh would survive Gettysburg and the Civil War; only to perish at 'Custer's Last Stand.' Only Keogh's horse would survive -- the horse's name--Commanche.

The Union Buford brother's cousin General Abraham Buford fought for the Confederacy.

Just some thoughts.

Respectfully submitted for consideration,
M. E. Wolf
 

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mt155

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#2
Thats great stuff. I am always astounded how small the world is when it comes to the inter relationships the men who fought had. I never new that Myles Keogh fought during the CW. As a kid I like to read about the Indian Wars but never did I realize that the same men who fought in the east, went out west after it was over and fought the Indians. I was reading "It's a Good Day to Die" about the Sioux wars a couple of years ago, and was surprised to figure out that the Gibbon they were talking about was the same Gibbon of the 2nd Corp. Someone need to write a where are they now type book or family tree connecting the war with Mexico, the CW and beyond. If there is such a book please let me know.

Mike .T
 

ole

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#3
Well. There ya go Mike. Write the book. Some copies will most certainly be purchased here.

ole
 

M E Wolf

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#4
Dear Mt155,

Captain Myles Keogh was General John Buford's friend as well as staff on his Cavalry unit. Captain Myles was at General Buford's deathbed, at General Stoneman's house when, the papers for his promotion came, President Lincoln insisting and Stanton dragging his heels--only obeyed Lincoln when it was sure Buford was not going to live--to promote Buford, back dated to July 1, the first days of Gettysburg--to the rank of Major General. Buford died in Keogh's arms.

General Stoneman, Captain Myles Keogh accompanied the body, after a funeral service--to West Point for military burial. General Buford's horse "Grey Eagle" to whom Buford rode in the Battle of Gettysburg, was the 'Comparison Horse,' at his funeral. [Comparison Horse, is the riderless horse with boots reversed in stirrups]

Just some added thoughts about John Buford, who died at the tender age of 37.

General Merritt, to whom was under Buford's command at Gettysburg, took over Buford's command and continued on.

Respectfully submitted,
M. E. Wolf
 

samgrant

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#5
Thats great stuff. I am always astounded how small the world is when it comes to the inter relationships the men who fought had. I never new that Myles Keogh fought during the CW. As a kid I like to read about the Indian Wars but never did I realize that the same men who fought in the east, went out west after it was over and fought the Indians. I was reading "It's a Good Day to Die" about the Sioux wars a couple of years ago, and was surprised to figure out that the Gibbon they were talking about was the same Gibbon of the 2nd Corp. Someone need to write a where are they now type book or family tree connecting the war with Mexico, the CW and beyond. If there is such a book please let me know.

Mike .T

Mike, You might like to try Peter Cozzens' Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865-1890 series. Check out the names in the table of contents of The Army and the Indian:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0811701239/ref=sib_dp_pop_toc?ie=UTF8&p=S00A#reader-link

--
 
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#7
Under rated

I must admit that John Buford is probably one of the most under rated cavalry men of the civil war. He preformed well at Brandy Station. Some would say, he was folding Stuart,s right when he was told to retire.

If you think about it, it was John Buford who chose to fight at Gettysburg, forcing a figh Lee did not want, yet.
 

M E Wolf

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#8
Dear 5fish,

In reading the Official Reports, it is apparent that General Jno. aka John Buford held the Confederates at bay, when the Union Forces retreated at Second Bull Run/Manassas; enabling them to flee and do so safely.

Buford, in some reports, got wounded in the knee.

In the battle of Brandy Station (VA), Buford performed wonderfully well. It was the largest cavalry engagement of the Civil War.

In reading in other sites, General Buford was wounded in the Gettysburg campaign. He was sent to guard the trains after doing the hard work of holding the Confederates like he did at Bull Run until proper commanders got onto the field.

I'm seeing a lot of Buford's qualities in sniffing out the enemy, to find good ground to his advantage, having good officers under him; e.g. Gamble, Devin, Merritt (who would take over his command when he was ill and after his death).

I personally believe he would have whipped the silly grin right off of General JEB Stuart if, Buford had commanders over him who would let Buford do his best talents.

But--I find that is the case throughout the Civil War on both sides--.

Although General Buford is listed as died of tyfoid fever, I suspect that it might have been related to the weather in his last campain; muddy, wet and chilled to the bone, no rest and not eatting as he should have. I've heard rumors that he could have died from complications of his wounds. This is possible. In Gettysburg, he allegedly was wounded in the arm and instead of taking treatment and leaving his men, he wrapped himself up and put a coat over himself so the men wouldn't worry or be distracted--this could be where infection could have started and six months later after Gettysburg, he was on his death bed. (I'm still hunting for the truth and official reports).

Just some thoughts.

Respectfully submitted for consideration,
M. E. Wolf
 



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