Period Fruit Cake, Its History and Some Recipes


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#83
I could never stand fruit cake, but I know many people enjoy them. So I will not recount the many legends involving involving fruit cakes that saved soldiers lives in WWII by stopping bullets and shrapnel.
I am afraid that bullets would go right through my fruitcake, and most others I had encountered. Even if it is a bit dry, you can warm it up in the microwave and serve it with lemon or vanilla sauce and it is still good.
 

truthckr

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#86
The wife has a fruit cake recipe that was handed down from "antiquity." It's very moist, I just don't like those candied fruits. I've threatened to hand out her recipe, but she informs me that's grounds for divorce; so I'll have to pass on giving out top secret information.

The batter involves adding a little wine while mixing. The best fruit cakes were made using her dad's homemade grape wine. That wine was made from his own backyard grape vines. It was amazing to see the batter start bubbling after adding his wine, I haven't really noticed it with the commercial wines she uses now.

I don't think I've passed out any "critical design information."
 

AnnaLee

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#88
I grew up on my mother's fruitcake and love it. Here is her recipe. She is from eastern Kentucky.

Butter- 2 sticks
1/2 Pound Dark Brown Sugar
1 Cup Dark Raisins and 1 Cup of Golden Raisins
1/2 Pound Chopped Dates (I buy whole dried ones and cut up into pieces)
1/2 Pound Dried Apricots (I cut these up into pieces).
1/4 Cup of Dark Molasses
1 Cup of Orange Juice

Combine the above ingredients and boil 3 minutes. Cool. Beat in 4 eggs. Add:

1/2 Pound of Candied Pineapple
2 Pounds of Red and Green Candied Cherries
1 Pound of Walnuts
1 Pound of Pecans

Mix 1 3/4 Cups Flour, 1 tsp Cinnamon, 1/2 tsp Cloves, 1/2 tsp Nutmeg, 1 tsp Salt, 1 tsp Soda, 1 tsp Baking Powder.
Add gradually to fruit mixture. If batter needs to be thicker add 1/4 Cup more Flour.

Grease, flour and line a tube pan with oiled wax paper. Spoon batter into pan and decorate top with nuts, fruit.

Bake in 275 degree oven for about 1 1/2 hours. Check for doneness with toothpick. Remove from pan and place cake on rack to cool.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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#89
Another interesting thread on fruitcakes. As I have written before what would Christmas be like without fruitcake. As I posted in another thread, my husband can't have them anymore because of the nuts. He used to love them.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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#92
Tropical Fruit Cake, a Florida recipe

4 cups unbleached white flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 cups chopped pecans
1 2/2 cups diced dried papaya
3/4 cup minced dates
2 cups light rum, divided
1 1/3 cup white raisins
1 cup butter
1 cup light honey
4 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift together flour and baking powder. Then stir in pecans, papaya and dates.
In a small pan, heat 1/2 cup rum and stir in raisins. Set this aside until raisins are plump.
In a medium bowl cream butter until light. Use mixed on medium speed or beat by hand. Add in honey and beat until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well with each addition. Beat in vanilla.
Combine butter mixture, flour and fruits. Pour into 4 greased 3 x 6 loaf pans.
Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Cool in pans. Remove to racks. While warm. pierce tops of cakes with toothpick in random patterns. Pour 2 tablespoons rum over each cake and allow to completely cool.
Place 1 cup rum in small bowl and soak 12 x 16 inch pieces of flannel until statured. Wrap cakes in flannel, then in 2 layers of aluminum foil. Store in cool place for about 2 weeks. It will then be ready for the Holidays.

This makes 4 loaves.

From "Cross Creek Kitchens", Sally Morrison and Kate Barnes.

Cross Creek is where Majorie Kinnan Rawlings lived. She wrote a cook book. She also was author of "Cross Creek", "South Moon Under and "The Yearling". Her home is now a state historic site. It is well worth a visit.

Cross Creek is on an isthmus between two large lakes. Spaniards once planted orange groves here and Indians enjoyed an abundance of readily available foods. Early settlers lived off the land here, with farming, fishing and tending citrus groves.
 

Polloco

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Sep 15, 2018
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Location
South Texas
#93
I heard that the Collin Street fruitcakes are made with only the little native pecans. They are supposed to be the "best" as far as flavor and natural oils go. That was probably true at one time. But I don't think so . The nuts look too big to be the natives. The natives are tasty but who wants to take several minutes to shell one pecan?
 

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