{⋆★⋆} BG Frost, Daniel M.

Daniel Marsh Frost

:CSA1stNat:
Frost.jpg


Born: August 9, 1823

Birth Place: Duanesburg, New York

Father: James Frost 1783 – 1851
(Buried: Mariaville Cemetery, Mariaville, New York)​

Mother: Mary Marsh 1788 – 1864
(Buried: Mariaville Cemetery, Mariaville, New York)​

1st Wife: Elizabeth Brown “Lilly” Graham Frost 1831 – 1872
(Buried: Cavalry Cemetery, Saint Louis, Missouri)​

2nd Wife: Harriet M. Chenie 1846 – 1878
(Buried: Cavalry Cemetery, Saint Louis, Missouri)​

3rd Wife: Catherine Jane Clemens 1840 – 1900
(Buried: Cavalry Cemetery, Saint Louis, Missouri)​

Children:

Richard Graham Frost 1851 – 1900​
(Buried: Cavalry Cemetery, Saint Louis, Missouri)​
Elizabeth Graham Frost 1870 – 1945​
(Buried: Christ Church, Shamley, Green Surrey, England)​

Education:

1844: Graduated from West Point Military Academy - (4th in class)​
Frost 1.jpg


Occupation before War:

1844 – 1846: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1844 – 1845: Garrison Duty at Fort Adams, Rhode Island​
1845: Garrison Duty at Fort Kent, Maine​
1845 – 1846: Garrison Duty at Fort Brooke, Florida​
1846: Garrison Duty at Fort Pickens, Florida​
1846 – 1847: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, Mounted Rifles​
1846 – 1851: Quartermaster for United States Army, Mounted Rifles​
1847 – 1850: 2nd Lt. United States Army, Mounted Rifles​
1847: Served in the Battle of Vera Cruz, Mexico​
1847: Served in the Battle of Cerro Gordo, Mexico​
1847: Brevetted 1st Lt. for Gallantry at Battle of Cerro Gordo​
1847: Served in the Battle of Churchbusco, Mexico​
1848 – 1849: Garrison Duty at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri​
1849: Frontier Duty at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas​
1849: Frontier Duty at Fort Kearny, Nebraska​
1849: Served in March to Oregon​
1849 – 1850: Frontier Duty at Oregon City, Oregon​
1850 – 1853: 1st Lt. United States Army Mounted Rifles​
1850: Frontier Duty at Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory​
1851: Recruiter for United States Army Mounted Rifles​
1851 – 1852: In Europe on Professional Duty​
1852: Frontier Duty at Fort Ewell Texas​
1852: Scout against the Comanche Indians​
1852 – 1853: Frontier Duty at Fort Ewell Texas​
1853: Resigned from United States Army on May 31st​
1853 – 1859: Owner of D. M. Frost & Company Fur trading Company​
1853 – 1858: Captain in Missouri State Militia
Frost 2.jpg
1854 – 1858: Missouri State Senator​
1858: Lt. Colonel of Missouri State Militia​
1858: Colonel of Missouri State Militia​
1858 – 1861: Brigadier General of Missouri State Militia​
1858 – 1861: Planter near St. Louis Missouri​
1860: Member of the Board of Visitors for West Point​

Civil War Career:

1858 – 1861: Brigadier General of Missouri State Militia​
1861: Captured and Paroled during Siege of St. Louis Arsenal​
1862 – 1863: Brigadier General, Confederate Army Infantry​
1862: Served duty in Memphis, Tennessee​
Inspector General for General Braxton Bragg​
1863: Brigade leader during Battle of Prairie Grove​
1863: Left the army for Canada as a result of the banishment of his wife and family from their home, near St. Louis, Missouri. He did so without notifying or gaining approval from the Confederate Army, and was listed as a deserter.​
1863 – 1865: Lived in Canada, didn't return until end of war​

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1900: Farmer near St. Louis, Missouri​

Died: October 29, 1900

Place of Death: Hazelwood, Missouri

Age at time of Death: 77 years old

Burial Place: Cavalry Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri
 
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Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
The unrest in St. Louis came from the "Camp Jackson Affair". Frost was in charge of Camp Jackson when it got back to Captain Nathaniel Lyons that secessionists at this Camp were planning to raid the Federal Arsenal at St. Louis. On May 10, 1861 Lyons led a regiment of volunteers to capture the secessionist raiders. The camp was surrounded and Frost surrendered without a shot being fired. After capturing the entire unit Lyon marched the captives into town to parole them. En route hostile crowds gathered and an "accidental" gunshot came from this crowd. Lyon's men fired into the mob/crowd, 28 civilians were killed and dozens injured.Even though Frost was paroled and released on the 11th several days of rioting followed and martial law was declared. Union regulars were dispatched to the city. Before any of this happened on April 26, 1861 Lyons had moved 21,000 rifles out of the arsenal across the river into Illinois by way of the steamer "City of Alton".
 
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Klaudly

Sergeant
Joined
Nov 11, 2013
Location
Italy
On what date did he leave the army? in September he was still in Trans-Mississippi Department
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
On what date did he leave the army? in September he was still in Trans-Mississippi Department
The biographys are pretty vaque about the actual date that he left the Army. One merely states Frost commanded a division in the District of Arkansas until the fall of 1863. Another states that Frost was dropped from the roster by the War Department on December 9, 1863. He did leave the army without first obtaining any official approval and did not resign.He was listed as a deserter until being officially dropped.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
One biography of Frost states that his daughter, Harriet, left $1,000,000 to the Saint Louis University in 1962. This may have been his grand daughter instead as the only daughter listed passed away in 1945.But it's possible it was a different daughter as Frost was married 3 times and had a total 11 children.
 
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